Marlborough museums – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 08:55:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough museums – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 Culture Recovery Fund: Museums and heritage sites win £ 107million share https://marlborough-monaco.com/culture-recovery-fund-museums-and-heritage-sites-win-107million-share/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:01:20 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/culture-recovery-fund-museums-and-heritage-sites-win-107million-share/ The latest round of the government’s £ 1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund rescue program, launched last year to shield cultural organizations from the economic impact of the coronavirus, has been announced. A share of £ 107million has been allocated of the additional £ 300million announced by the Chancellor in the March budget for the Culture […]]]>

The latest round of the government’s £ 1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund rescue program, launched last year to shield cultural organizations from the economic impact of the coronavirus, has been announced.

A share of £ 107million has been allocated of the additional £ 300million announced by the Chancellor in the March budget for the Culture Recovery Fund, bringing the total amount of cash support made available for cultivation during the pandemic to nearly £ 2 billion.

£ 100million in Continuity Support Grants will be provided to more than 870 former recipients of the Culture Recovery Fund administered by the Arts Council of England, the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Historic England and the British Film Institute .

Arts Council England funding for the museum sector

A total of 41 museums and museum organizations received funds from the Cultural Recovery Fund, which were distributed by the Arts Council England (ACE).

The museums sector received a total of £ 5.7million or 6.13% of total ACE funding to cultural institutions, which is less than ACE funding for 62 theaters which received a total £ 6million via a grant from the British Film Institute, and less than UK cinemas across the country will receive more than £ 30million in total.

Of the ACE funding announced today for museums and museum organizations, twelve are in the south-east for a total of £ 1.6million, nine are in the north for a total of £ 1.1million sterling, eight are in the Midlands for a total of £ 0.6million, seven are in the southwest for a total of £ 1.5million and five are in London for a total of £ 0.7million of pounds sterling.

London Transport Museum received the largest one-time investment of £ 450,000, intended to boost its long-term recovery after being shut down for 355 days during the pandemic.

Grant recipients also include Norfolk Museums Service, which will receive £ 228,000, and Brunel museum in London which received a grant of £ 56,000.

£ 98,000 has been awarded to Worthing Theaters and Museum, which operates four theaters and museums in the region.

The Rose Marie at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard received a grant of £ 327,652 to help cover the costs of ensuring that the ship and the collection remain on display to the public, and the ss Great Britain Trust received £ 429,705 to support STEM learning, visitor experiences, winter maintenance and conservation.

Of the £ 93million total given to all cultural organizations today through ACE funding, London has received a total of £ 31million, more than £ 10million more than the combined grants to the North (including North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber). However, Leeds Grand Theater & Opera House received the largest injection of funds, having received £ 1.2million.

No emergency resource grants were provided to ACE museum organizations, which totaled £ 6.2million and were allocated primarily to the music, arts and theater sectors.

National Lottery Heritage Fund Grants

Grants to the heritage sector, through the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Heritage England, allow 14 heritage organizations to receive a total of £ 1.7million. The biggest recipient of the latest grants is Exeter Cathedral, which receives £ 566,000.

The announced funding is part of the £ 40million that has been made available through this third round of funding. It is divided into two components, depending on the level of demand.

The Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage Continuity Support amounts to £ 1.3million.

The attributions are as follows:

Bath preservation trust – £ 444,900
The Restoration Trust – £ 33,100
The Fortescue Garden Trust – £ 36,300
Exeter Cathedral – £ 566,000
Landward Research Ltd – £ 29,200
Future Seed CIC – £ 26,900
Association of Ukrainians (Nottingham branch) – £ 24,000
Marlborough Productions CIC – £ 24,100
North Tyneside Ltd Disability Forum – £ 29,900
The Parish Church Council of the Ecclesiastical Parish of St Petroc, Bodmin – £ 17,500
Peter Rogan & Associates Limited – £ 80,000

The Culture Recovery Fund to support emergency heritage resources, intended for organizations in dire need of it and had not yet received support from the Culture Recovery Fund, amounts to 0.47 million pounds sterling.

This fund was mainly allocated to Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway Company, a heritage railway attraction in the Lake District that receives £ 451,500, alongside Nottingham CIC Press Center who receives £ 12,900 and Co Creative Solutions Limited, who receives £ 10,500.

Darren Henley, Managing Director of Arts Council England, said: “This continued government investment on an unprecedented scale means that our theaters, galleries, concert halls, museums and arts centers can continue to play their part in bringing back the visitors to our main streets. , helping to stimulate economic growth, stimulate community pride and promote good health.


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The best museums in Dunedin and Ōamaru https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-best-museums-in-dunedin-and-oamaru/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-best-museums-in-dunedin-and-oamaru/ Dunedin may be synonymous with rowdy students, but he’s as proud of his past as of the bright young minds who will help determine his future. As the historic heart of Otago, it’s only fitting that the city is home to several museums, many of which rival – if not eclipse – the best of […]]]>

Dunedin may be synonymous with rowdy students, but he’s as proud of his past as of the bright young minds who will help determine his future.

As the historic heart of Otago, it’s only fitting that the city is home to several museums, many of which rival – if not eclipse – the best of our great cities.

The Steampunk HQ portal will transport you to what feels like a parallel dimension.

Mytchall Bransgrove / Stuff

The Steampunk HQ portal will transport you to what feels like a parallel dimension.

Seaside Ōamaru, on the other hand, has a sort of living museum in the form of its well-preserved Victorian compound, as well as some genuine characteristic museums.

If you’re ready to broaden your mind on your next visit, be sure to try at least one of these excellent museums.

READ MORE:
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* Room review: Fable Dunedin is a clever mix of old and new
* Ōamaru: How a city moved forward while retreating

Dunedin

Museum of natural mysteries

Muralist and street artist Bruce Mahalksi turned part of his home into a museum to display his work and lifelong collections.

DunedinNZ / Supplied

Muralist and street artist Bruce Mahalksi turned part of his home into a museum to display his work and lifelong collections.

Reminiscent of Dr Johnson’s home in London, this private museum is full of weird and wonderful artifacts collected by local artist Bruce Mahalski during the adventure that has clearly been his life.

Occupying three rooms in his downtown villa, the collection includes skulls, bones, fossils, biological curiosities, ethnological art, bone sculptures and animal paintings made by Mahalski himself. There’s even a Gloriavale uniform and a piece of wood from what is said to be England’s most haunted house.

The signs help tell the intriguing stories behind the pieces, and Mahalski is more than happy to elaborate. If you have even a passing interest in the mysteries of the natural and supernatural worlds, you will be bound to be intrigued.

Otago Museum

A Moeraki Boulder installed outside the Otago Museum.

Hamish McNeilly / Stuff

A Moeraki Boulder installed outside the Otago Museum.

Moa bones, an ancient Egyptian mummy and a living tropical forest teeming with a waterfall, exotic butterflies, giant stick insects, tarantulas, turtles and a ‘sky bridge’ are among the estimated 1.5 million of delicacies to discover at the Otago Museum.

The Tūhura Science Center is the only bicultural science center in the world, combining the science, art and creative history of Kāi Tahu. If that’s not enough to convince you that this is no ordinary museum, maybe the three-story indoor slide and bicycle skeleton will. Use laser beams to uncover the stories behind the images that spark your interest in the Beautiful Science Gallery, and zoom in on the stars, constellations and planets that can be seen in the Dunedin night sky during a tour of the planetarium.

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum traces the history of the colonization of the South Island

DUNEDINNZ

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum traces the history of the colonization of the South Island

Spanning nearly two blocks, this over 120-year-old museum tells the stories of the people who helped make Otago – and New Zealand – what it is today.

The more than 100,000 objects highlight the culture, fashion, art and transportation of the area from the Maori settlement to the present day.

The Smith Gallery, where portraits of early settlers hang from floor to ceiling, is a powerful visual tribute to the pioneers of the region, with other highlights including the collection of vintage dresses and handcrafted furniture from the 19th century. and twentieth centuries. Interactive exhibits such as a reconstructed settler’s house, a ship’s cabin, and the Chinese-style garden help bring all of this fascinating history to life.

Olveston Historic House

Olveston offers a fascinating glimpse into the life of a wealthy merchant family at the turn of the 20th century.

Claudia Babirat / Stuff

Olveston offers a fascinating glimpse into the life of a wealthy merchant family at the turn of the 20th century.

Filled with fancy antique furniture and artwork from around the world, Olverston is a time capsule in the form of what looks like a giant gingerbread house.

Little has changed in the Edwardian mansion – built for one of Dunedin’s foremost businessmen, philanthropists, and collectors – since it was occupied as a family home between 1906 and 1966. Its many treasures include 18th and 19th century Japanese weapons, Chinese jade and ceramics, and paintings by Frances Hodgkins and Grace Joel.

Guided tours of the house take an hour, but you will need more time if you want to explore the ‘garden of national significance’ in which it is located. What you absolutely should do.

amaru

Town of Whitestone

This 1882 attic in the heart of the Victorian walls of Ōamaru will take you back to its Victorian heyday.

Stroll through a replica of the Victorian streetscape, snap your photo toast at a Victorian table, learn a thing or two about the Victorian education system in the school, and ride the penny carousel.

Costumed guides are informative without being intrusive, and many guests enjoy looting the costume equipment themselves (in some cases just for the sake of creating humorous photographs). Old-school games such as bowling and croquet will keep you entertained as well, as will the guide’s tales of Ōamaru’s sometimes sketchy past.

Steampunk HQ

Steampunk HQ reuses machines and technology from the past for a sensational effect.

MYTCHALL BRANSGROVE / STUFF / Stuff

Steampunk HQ reuses machines and technology from the past for a sensational effect.

Unlike most museums which focus resolutely on the past, this one imagines an alternate reality where the past, present and future converge.

Steampunk culture envisions what the world might be like if the Industrial Revolution never happened and the power of steam reigned supreme. The concept gave birth to some truly ingenious creations, many of which are rightly on display in this former grain house in the so-called ‘steampunk capital of the world’. Think of a steam locomotive spewing out flames and smoke at the right time, and heavy retro-futuristic contraptions of copper, gears, pipes and gas cylinders.

There are also very punk rock sculptures, and projects in various stages of “steampunking”, like a giant motorcycle and an “ethertractor”. With hundreds of multi-colored LED lights appearing to extend into infinity, “The Portal,” meanwhile, is quite the trip. You won’t – and shouldn’t – believe your eyes.

Stay Safe: New Zealand is currently subject to restrictions related to Covid-19. Follow the instructions on covid19.govt.nz.


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Gilbert & George: “All the museums are now awake” https://marlborough-monaco.com/gilbert-george-all-the-museums-are-now-awake/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/gilbert-george-all-the-museums-are-now-awake/ As I walked into the east London studio of artists Gilbert and George, I expected something like a cathedral. After all, their work over the past five decades has reused the bright medieval aesthetic of stained glass for photo collages of modern city life, their icons ranging from skinheads and bus shelters to sex workers […]]]>

As I walked into the east London studio of artists Gilbert and George, I expected something like a cathedral. After all, their work over the past five decades has reused the bright medieval aesthetic of stained glass for photo collages of modern city life, their icons ranging from skinheads and bus shelters to sex workers and shit. While there is nothing numinous about their studio, they don’t disappoint on the front of the icon: the first thing I see is a white wall covered in photographs, printed or torn from the newspapers, from everyone from the Queen to big rugby players to Chancellor Rishi. Sunak (several appearances).

“It’s our wall of pin-ups,” said George Passmore, 79.

Medieval is not a comparison that the duo, who have been inseparable partners since meeting at St Martin’s School of Art in London in 1967, do not recognize it, nor any other tradition. “We are not going down this road,” said Gilbert Prousch, 78. “All modern life is more like our pictures, right? If you go to a Tesco, the whole design looks more like ours, don’t you think? “

“Young people say it’s more like Space invaders, said Georges.

George Passmore (left) and Gilbert Prousch have been partners since 1967 © Gilbert & George, courtesy of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

We meet to discuss a moment in their career that is a little closer to Space invaders than the medieval era: Gilbert and George were featured in the 1982 edition of the prestigious five-year documenta art exhibition in Kassel, Germany, and the Thaddaeus Ropac gallery will present their works and those of other artists from documenta 7 at Frieze Masters next week. In “Street Meet” (1982), a young green man poses a bit like San Sebastian in front of a black and white urban scene, while yellow Gilbert and George stand stiff like visitors from another planet.

However, they don’t seem inclined to dwell on this show, beyond Gilbert saying it was “very important” and “extraordinary” to them, without much elaboration. George is keen to point out the freedom, humanism and recognizable signs of their work as a whole: “We realized as baby artists leaving St Martin that [fellow students] all made beautiful shapes and beautiful colors and beautiful angles; they never discussed life, hope, death, sex, beauty, unhappiness, terror or fear, ever.

Their conversation is antiphonic, one picking up where the other left off. Gilbert follows George: “They all have a formalism – shapes – and we’ve never had that, from day one. We only have . . . the humanism of a person, the center of our art is that. The individual today, how he walks in life. It became our subject and it was quite different, I still think it’s quite different from a lot of other artists. Their latest photos have included the artists displayed in bus shelters, newspaper headline posters (they stole 3,700 tickets in London for inspiration) and postcard arrangements featuring the British flag.

Gilbert and George wish to emphasize their difference from the attitudes and practices of other artists. On the one hand, they dress in identical formal clothes. George today wears a speckled orange suit, white shirt and hot pink tie with blue crows, Gilbert wears the same suit but green and the same tie but blue. Likewise, they don’t care much about the politics of the art world, as becomes clear when I ask about the gallery they set up near Brick Lane to show their work (“Gilbert’s World & George ”as they call her) in perpetuity. Are they doing it because they don’t think other galleries, like the Tate, will pass posterity on them?

A man with a yellow face looks at the silhouettes of two naked men on a golden background.  There is also a large pink orchid

‘Naked Beauty’ (1982) by Gilbert & George © Gilbert & George, courtesy of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Gilbert said: “They have 23 [of our] pieces they never show. . . All the museums are now awake. Wake up ? “Yes.” And are you not awake? George: “We were awake before we woke up.” Gilbert: “No, we don’t know what it is, we’re normal.”

Why does the “revival” exclude Gilbert & George, pioneering queer artists? Gilbert: “Because right now it’s all black art, all female art, all this art and this art. Go take a look at the Tate Modern, I’m sure they don’t have any [Francis] Bacon up. And let’s not even talk about Tate Britain, where mostly British artists are shown, whom Gilbert calls “provincial” and which George absurdly compares to apartheid in South Africa. It’s really different from other artists. It also rings odd with their long-standing philosophy of “art for all”, which does not seem to extend to art. through all.

They also seem sincere about their vision of art for all. Gilbert: “It often feels like people can’t have anything, all those works of art that are too expensive for everyone except the rich, but normal people can’t have anything.

But you are represented by White Cube, purveyor of art to the rich.

Gilbert: “We have to sell works to continue. We love, what do you call it, capitalism.

George: “We’re not against anything like all artists normally are.”

Gilbert: “They want to be billionaires but at the same time they say they are socialists.”

(George later adds: “We are very socialists but we would never say we were socialists.”)

A white gallery space with large photos on the walls

A view of the installation of Gilbert & George’s show ‘New Normal Pictures’ at the White Cube gallery, May 2021 © Gilbert & George / White Cube / Ollie Hammick

I ask if it would be possible for an art student to move to London today, like Gilbert and George from South Tyrol did in the 1960s, and survive college and then do career, given the high cost of living after Brexit. visa difficulties and government cuts in funding for art classes. George doesn’t buy it: “We would do the same, find the one place we could afford to live. We’re only here because it was the cheapest place in London, that’s the only reason. It was £ 12 a month for any floor of any building on rue Fournier, the attic or the basement. (A house down the street sold for £ 6million in March 2021; Gilbert and George bought theirs in 1972.)

George points out that London’s vibrant arts scene is a boon for today. “When we were baby artists there were two galleries in London – there was the Marlborough or the Kasmin and that was it.” Gilbert: “Now there are millions and millions of artists out there. It is, of course, a transformed art world.

But the city changed with it, and throughout our conversation I found it puzzled how Gilbert and George can brag about their close observation of London – George puts on the table three pieces of string he found in the street after breakfast, fresh material for a work of art – but also ignore how many of its inhabitants experience it. Perhaps it is precisely that their local universe consumes all their vision.

As our conversation ends, Gilbert and George show me some ink posters they made to be sold for the benefit of the Serpentine Gallery – NO WAY. KISS ME. FUCK ‘EM ALL (“Our General Approach to Life,” George says) – and show me through their immaculately restored 18th century home. I ask to take a picture of them to remember what they are wearing; they oblige, standing a little uncomfortably on the threshold, and it seems to me that in many ways Gilbert and George’s world doesn’t go much further than their doorstep.

ropac.net


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Free Museum Entrance Marks Legacy of Civil Rights Icon Hamer – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentry https://marlborough-monaco.com/free-museum-entrance-marks-legacy-of-civil-rights-icon-hamer-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentry/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/free-museum-entrance-marks-legacy-of-civil-rights-icon-hamer-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentry/ October 6, 1917 – Birth of political activist Fannie Lou Hamer. Admission to two Mississippi history museums is free Wednesday to mark the birthday of the late civil rights icon Fannie Lou Hamer, known for saying she was “sick and tired of being sick and tired.” She was born on October 6, 1917 in Montgomery […]]]>

October 6, 1917 – Birth of political activist Fannie Lou Hamer.

Admission to two Mississippi history museums is free Wednesday to mark the birthday of the late civil rights icon Fannie Lou Hamer, known for saying she was “sick and tired of being sick and tired.”

She was born on October 6, 1917 in Montgomery County and worked most of her life as a sharecropper. In 1962 Hamer joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and worked to get black people on the electoral roll. Hamer was one of the founders of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which contested the seat of the regular party’s all-white delegation to the 1964 Democratic National Convention.

Hamer died of cancer on March 14, 1977.

Pamela DC Junior is director of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History – two entities under one roof in downtown Jackson. She said Hamer changed Mississippi and the world.

“Tenacity, inspiration and ‘never give up’ are words and phrases that Fannie Lou Hamer has lived through. His courage and strength brought about change for all of humanity, ”Junior said in a press release announcing free admission to both museums. “May we all live like her by being and showing examples of good management in our communities. “

Museum staff will organize guided tours at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. to discuss Hamer’s life and legacy.


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Museums have offered free passes to mark the 150th anniversary of Sir Ernest Rutherford’s birth https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-have-offered-free-passes-to-mark-the-150th-anniversary-of-sir-ernest-rutherfords-birth/ Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-have-offered-free-passes-to-mark-the-150th-anniversary-of-sir-ernest-rutherfords-birth/ Provided Ernest Rutherford received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1908 and was the first to divide the atom. Monday marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Sir Ernest Rutherford, and a special gift to celebrate the occasion is being made with the aim of inspiring a new generation of scientists. Rutherford, the son […]]]>
Ernest Rutherford received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1908 and was the first to divide the atom.

Provided

Ernest Rutherford received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1908 and was the first to divide the atom.

Monday marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Sir Ernest Rutherford, and a special gift to celebrate the occasion is being made with the aim of inspiring a new generation of scientists.

Rutherford, the son of a dairy farmer from Nelson, received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1908 and later became the first person to split the atom.

To mark the day of his birth – 150 years ago, August 30, 1871 – the Dodd-Walls Center for Photonic and Quantum Technologies is offering family passes to two museums: the Auckland Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT) and the Tūhura in the Otago Museum. .

Each museum, which had a formal agreement with the Dodds-Walls Center, was offered 150 passes to give to families, center director Professor David Hutchinson said.

READ MORE:
* Aotearoa jumps into the second quantum revolution
* ‘Greatest New Zealand’ celebrated with ‘hands-on’ science in Rutherford Cottage replica
* Photonics: The $ 1.2 billion New Zealand industry you’ve never heard of

The Dodd-Walls Center mainly focused on atomic and optical physics, especially low-temperature atomic physics and quantum optics, which was directly due to the work and influence of Rutherford, said Hutchinson.

“Sir Ernest Rutherford was Aotearoa’s first Nobel Laureate and his achievements paved the way for many breakthroughs and technologies that we take for granted today.

“What better way to mark your accomplishments than by trying to present the incredible possibilities of science to the next generation.”

Dr Craig Grant of the Otago Museum said the institution will give its free passes to students at the school.

RNZ

Thirteen-year-old New Zealanders scored record highs in a global math and science test. The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study tested half a million children in 64 countries last year. (First published on December 9, 2020)

“We hope that this initiative, in addition to arousing interest and passion for science in some of our young people, will also help the schools themselves. “

MOTAT Museum Experience CEO Sally Manuireva said: “Rutherford has had a profound impact on science and as a country we are all very proud of his accomplishments.

“It’s a chance to help encourage the next generation to engage in science and technology and maybe one day build on its heritage.”

The Otago Museum would distribute 50 family passes in three ballots, six months apart, and schools could apply for five passes each per ballot.

The first round of voting opens on Monday.

MOTAT would award family passes through its Auckland school network.


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MUSEUMS: Nowashe Village to host “Wingmasters” program | Free time https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-nowashe-village-to-host-wingmasters-program-free-time/ Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-nowashe-village-to-host-wingmasters-program-free-time/ SOUTH WINDSOR – The village of Nowashe at the Wood Memorial Library and Museum will host “Wingmasters: Native American Birds of Prey & Native American Craft and Culture” Saturday from 10am to 11am. The presentation, by Julie Anne Collier, features live birds of prey that cannot be released into the wild. It also focuses on […]]]>

SOUTH WINDSOR – The village of Nowashe at the Wood Memorial Library and Museum will host “Wingmasters: Native American Birds of Prey & Native American Craft and Culture” Saturday from 10am to 11am.

The presentation, by Julie Anne Collier, features live birds of prey that cannot be released into the wild. It also focuses on Indian crafts from the plains and woods and shows how different Native American cultures transformed natural materials into objects of beauty and drama.

Most of the objects on display incorporate feathers from birds of prey. Handicrafts featured on the program range from headdresses, clothing and jewelry to shields and weapons. Perlage, spiciness and basketwork are also presented.

Tickets cost $ 20 for adults and $ 15 for students aged 6 and over and students upon presentation of ID.

This price includes entry to the museum in the village of Nowashe on Saturday and all presenters or activities that are scheduled during normal museum hours from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

• The village of Nowashe will go back in time on Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Indigenous educator Miciah Statis will present modern wampum jewelry. Statis will be showcasing handcrafted wampum jewelry, some of which will be available for purchase.

Step back in time with Bloomfield author Chris Duffy Zerillo as she reads and discusses her new historical fiction novel, “Still Here,” about the early conflict between Native Americans and Massachusetts settlers.

Finally, join educationalists Maureen Bourn and Monica Duval as they travel through time to the Paleo, Archaic and Forest periods.

Museum enthusiasts will see the tools that have made it possible to survive and thrive in the Connecticut environment. Tools from the Stone Age and their modern equivalents will also be explored.

Admission to Nowashe Village always includes a self-guided multimedia tour on your personal electronic device, a glimpse of a special Native American artifact, an Explorer activity for kids, and docents on duty ready to answer your questions.

Nowashe Village participates in the Connecticut Summer at Museums program. All summer long, children 18 and under, plus an accompanying adult, enter participating Connecticut museums free of charge.

The village of Nowashe is located at 787 Main Street in South Windsor, just behind the Wood Memorial Library. Visit Nowashe.org and start making new discoveries today.

The Hebron Historic Properties Commission has opened two historic sites for tours from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. through Sunday.

The two buildings now reside with the Old Town Records Building and 1856 Horton House, in the Town Office Building complex at 15 Gilead Street.

The two new buildings are the Gull School and the WWII Civilian Aircraft Observation Post.

Gull School, in the Grayville section of Hebron, was located at the intersection of Grayville Road and Old Colchester Road.

The original building burned down and this replacement was built around 1815.

In 1949, when Hebron Elementary School was opened, all of the city’s one-room schools were closed.

Henrietta Green bought the Gull Schoolhouse, moved it to her property, and made it look like it did when she taught there in the early 1930s.

The observation post was built in 1942 on top of Post Hill, Columbia, just above the Hebron city limit.

“Spotters” were scheduled in both Hebron and Columbia for 24/7 coverage, and they reported every aircraft that passed through the Boston screening center. The fear at the time was that the Atlantic and Pacific coastal states could be attacked by the Axis during the war. In addition to the frontline activities, you will see information about the individuals of Hebron who served our country, as well as an extensive collection of WWII books, sheet music, photos and more.

The South Windsor Historical Society will be offering physical and virtual tours of its Pleasant Valley District # 5 School Museum during the summer.

Used as a district elementary school from 1862 to 1952, the building was renovated and expanded by the company as a local history museum containing memorabilia from the school and the city. It is the only former district school in South Windsor that has not been demolished or converted into a house. It replaced an old school that had been built on the north side of Ellington Road in 1837.

Most of the upper level is kept as a typical 19th century school hall, while the lower level displays various objects from the town’s agricultural and social history.

Family or small group appointments for a free physical tour of the museum at 727 Ellington Road can be made by calling Museum President Joan Walsh at 860-644-6000.

HARTFORD – The Mark Twain House and Museum has a new tour, “Growing Up in the Golden Age: Daily Life in Susy, Clara and Jean’s House”.

During this hour-long interactive tour, young visitors explore the daily lives of the Clemens girls – the books, games and songs they loved, the subjects they studied, and the people they interacted with. This tour is best suited for ages 4-9. For information and tickets visit: MarkTwainHouse.org/Kids

The D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts at the Springfield Museums will host the “Ai Weiwei: Tradition and Dissent” exhibit until January 2.

Internationally renowned artist and social activist, Weiwei is an artistic innovator, provocateur and political dissident who explores tradition in non-traditional, even radical ways. This exhibition focuses on works of art that represent Ai’s engagement with traditional Chinese materials, methods, patterns and artifacts.


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LA County Natural History Museums Announce Changes to Their Board Leadership; Heather de Roos to lead the board of directors – Larchmont Buzz https://marlborough-monaco.com/la-county-natural-history-museums-announce-changes-to-their-board-leadership-heather-de-roos-to-lead-the-board-of-directors-larchmont-buzz/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/la-county-natural-history-museums-announce-changes-to-their-board-leadership-heather-de-roos-to-lead-the-board-of-directors-larchmont-buzz/ The Los Angeles County Natural History Museums (NHMLAC) have announced a roster of new volunteer leaders for the museums board of trustees and board of governors for the next fiscal year, starting July 1, 2021. Heather de Roos has been appointed Chair of the Board, succeeding Shannon Faulk, who served as Chair of the Board […]]]>

The Los Angeles County Natural History Museums (NHMLAC) have announced a roster of new volunteer leaders for the museums board of trustees and board of governors for the next fiscal year, starting July 1, 2021.

Heather de Roos has been appointed Chair of the Board, succeeding Shannon Faulk, who served as Chair of the Board for four years and will become Chair of the Board. Megan McGowan Epstein has been appointed vice-chair of the board. Kermit Crawford was named a new board member and Naomi Rainey-Pierson was elected to the NHMLAC board of governors by 4th district supervisor Janice Hahn. Sarah Meeker Jensen, FAIA, former chair of the board and most recently chair of the board, will no longer be a member of the board.

“NHMLAC is incredibly fortunate to have a Board of Directors with an inspiring vision, boundless enthusiasm, and a progressive commitment to building and uplifting community through our purpose of nature and culture.” said Dr Lori Bettison-Varga, President and Director. “We couldn’t have made it through this past year without their fearless and unwavering leadership. Partnering with Heather, Shannon, Megan and our new members, we join our county in recovery and reopening, and are filled with optimism and enthusiasm as we discover new ways to bring our mission to life, as museums of, for and with Los Angèle. “

De Roos has served on the NHMLAC Board of Directors since 2012 and served as Vice Chairman of the Board from September 2019 to June 2021 (Full disclosure: This writer served with her on the NHM Board of Directors). She follows a family tradition of service at NHMLAC where her father, Kevin W. Sharer, served as chairman of the board and led a major renovation of the fairgrounds which included three large exhibition halls.

“He’s been very encouraging,” de Roos told The Buzz. She is also the director of the Carol H. and Kevin W. Sharer Education Foundation, which recently launched a scholarship program to help community college students transitioning to four-year universities.

Initially, de Roos said she was reluctant to take on the role she thought her predecessor Shannon Faulk had fulfilled so well; but she’s more comfortable now than she should be. De Roos is a hard working member of the board of directors with a lot of experience. She also serves on the board of directors of the Manhattan Beach Education Foundation and as the vice president of fundraising for the Neptunian Woman’s Club scholarships as well as the president of the PTA for Mira Costa High School.

She laughed when we suggested that being president of the PTA is one of the toughest jobs we’ve ever done!

“Yes, it’s nice to attend a meeting and see the food already prepared,” she joked.

Although it is a difficult time, De Roos said she was very excited to lead efforts to reopen the museum to visitors after being closed for so long due to the pandemic.

“We are fortunate to have donors and Los Angeles County leaders supporting our mission, so we are poised to recoup our earned income in the form of ticket sales and income from our stores and cafes to pre-pandemic levels, ”de Roos said. She hopes people will react to the new membership efforts and news of an upcoming exhibit this fall on the life and work of Jane Goodall. De Roos said Goodall plans to visit, noting that his work is perfectly aligned with the museum’s mission to inspire the next generation of scientists.

“Fortunately, we have been able to maintain all of our staff thanks to closed site grants, continued county support and our endowment,” said de Roos. “The good thing about this pandemic has been that we were able to bring the museum to so many people. We really started balancing ourselves from a purely location-based institution to really having a bigger digital presence. With the virtual programming we’ve added and the mobile museum we’ve added, we’ve really improved our reach beyond our walls and I’m really proud of it.

De Roos is also proud to lead an increasingly diverse board with the addition Naomi Rainey Pierson, appointed NHMLAC governor by Fourth District Supervisor Janice Hahn and will begin in July 2021. Rainey-Pierson was sworn in to the Long Beach Board of Water Commissioners in October 2020 by Mayor Robert Garcia, and is a award-winning educator, philanthropist, entrepreneur and civil rights activist who works with thousands of community members, including many at-risk children. She previously served as vice president of the California State Conference NAACP and president of the Long Beach branch of the NAACP since 2000. Rainey-Pierson holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from California State University, Long Beach in Theater Arts. , as well as two master’s degrees in education and several teaching credentials. She also has certifications in cultural diversity and human relations.

Also joining the board as a director is Kermit Crawford. He was President and COO of Rite Aid Corporation from 2017 to 2019 and was an operating partner and advisor to private equity firm Sycamore Partners from 2015 to 2017. He retired from Walgreens as a vice -executive chairman and president of pharmacy, health and wellness. Division in 2014 after 30 years in the company. Crawford holds a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from Texas Southern University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

Faulk, who has served on the NHMLAC board since 2008, when he was appointed by Yvonne Brathwaite-Burke, then Los Angeles County Second District Supervisor, to the Board of Governors, will now serve as Chairman of the Board. advice.

“We are making very active efforts to increase the inclusion and diversity of museum staff and management,” said de Roos. We want to have the most welcoming and inclusive environment possible for the community. “

Before the end of the year, the museum will inaugurate The Commons, a new visitor center located on the southwest side of the museum grounds in the exhibition grounds. The plan is to be ready for the opening of the Lucas Museum, which will bring more visitors to the fairgrounds and NHMLAC is hoping they will cross the street and visit the museum as well.

“This will be a new programming area for the museum where people can visit without a ticket,” de Roos explained. The project included a renovation of the current theater, a new café and landscaped gardens designed by Studio-MLA who also designed the Museum’s Nature Gardens.

Plans are also underway to reinvent the Tar Pits Museum in Hancock Park. Recently, the museum completed its master planning process for the project which included extensive community outreach. De Roos will lead efforts to rally financial support for the project.

“I am very proud of the community involvement,” said de Roos. “This is exactly the kind of approach I want us to continue to take. We see the Tar Pits Museum as a center for science and community. It is a historic site and it needs to be managed appropriately. It’s going to take a lot of support, but it’s a great opportunity to further exhibit our incredible collection, the majority of which is not currently on display.

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Museums must now hold a firearms dealer’s license https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-must-now-hold-a-firearms-dealers-license/ Sun, 11 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-must-now-hold-a-firearms-dealers-license/ MONIQUE FORD / Stuff Museums must apply for a firearms dealer license to collect, hold and display firearms as a result of changes to the Arms Legislation Act 2020. Pictured is Te Papa. (File photo) New Zealand museums are now required to hold a firearms dealer’s license to collect, hold and display firearms and have […]]]>
Museums must apply for a firearms dealer license to collect, hold and display firearms as a result of changes to the Arms Legislation Act 2020. Pictured is Te Papa.  (File photo)

MONIQUE FORD / Stuff

Museums must apply for a firearms dealer license to collect, hold and display firearms as a result of changes to the Arms Legislation Act 2020. Pictured is Te Papa. (File photo)

New Zealand museums are now required to hold a firearms dealer’s license to collect, hold and display firearms and have just over a month to apply.

The new rule is part of changes to the Arms Legislation Act 2020 that impact the current dealer licensing rules.

Victoria Esson, board member of the International Council of Museums of Aotearoa in New Zealand and director of national services Te Paerangi, said the new gun licensing rules “would help ensure that guns firearms are safer, better documented and that all personnel responsible for weapons in museums are aware of their responsibilities and have the knowledge and skills to mitigate potential security risks ”.

“Aotearoa Museums, Te Paerangi National Services and specialists in our sector are working proactively with New Zealand Police to study in detail the impact and requirements of license changes in our sector.

READ MORE:
* Stricter government gun laws include registry to track guns and new offenses and penalties
* Police seize more than 1,300 firearms each year
* Changes to gun law overseen by Jacinda Ardern are criticized

Museums are affected by the changes to the Act.  Pictured, Chris Rapley of the South Canterbury Museum holds a single-shot handgun, known as the Kea Gun.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Museums are affected by the changes made to the Act. Pictured, South Canterbury Museum’s Chris Rapley holds a single-shot handgun, known as the Kea Gun.

“Our shared priority is to ensure that all museums receive the guidance and support they need to ensure that they can continue to hold and display firearms in their collections in accordance with the Law on Firearms. weapons licenses. “

One of the main changes to the law, described in a police press release, is “the expansion of the types of activities that require a distributor’s license”.

Under the new rules, those who display guns as a director or curator of a real museum and those who repair or modify guns must apply for a gun dealer license.

Police urge people to “view the expanded list of dealership activities and file the required claims.”

“The police are aware that (…) some people have been legally engaged in activities that did not previously require a dealer’s license – for example, exhibiting weapons as a director or curator of a museum, or repairing weapons . “

Museums across the country will now need a firearms dealer's license to own and display firearms.  Pictured, Chris Rapley is hosting an exhibit at the South Canterbury Museum earlier this year.  (File photo)

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Museums across the country will now need a firearms dealer’s license to own and display firearms. Pictured, Chris Rapley is hosting an exhibit at the South Canterbury Museum earlier this year. (File photo)

Those affected by the changes have until August 23 to submit a request.

“During this time, they must otherwise comply with the law.”

New Zealand Shooters Association president Neville Dodd has raised concerns about the potential impact of the new rules.

“Museums are already required to have a standard firearms license if they have firearms in their collection.

“Requiring now that they hold an annual firearms dealer license only adds unnecessary complexity and cost, as museums are obviously not buying, selling, renting or manufacturing guns and therefore are not dealers, ”Dodd said.

He said museums have adequate security to ensure gun safety and the new law will only discourage them from fulfilling their function of presenting an important part of New Zealand’s history.

“Firearms are an important part of New Zealand’s world history and preventing this history from being preserved with unnecessary and complex law changes will result in the loss of an important part of that history for future generations. “

New Zealand police were unable to confirm the cost of a gun dealer license for museums.


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CT Children Admission Free In State Museums This Summer | Connecticut News https://marlborough-monaco.com/ct-children-admission-free-in-state-museums-this-summer-connecticut-news/ Wed, 30 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/ct-children-admission-free-in-state-museums-this-summer-connecticut-news/ (WFSB) – Your family’s next trip to a state museum might end up costing you less. Governor Ned Lamont on Wednesday announced a new program that allows Connecticut children to receive free admission to all state museums during the summer months of 2021. “This program offers children a unique opportunity to enjoy the world-class museums […]]]>

(WFSB) – Your family’s next trip to a state museum might end up costing you less.

Governor Ned Lamont on Wednesday announced a new program that allows Connecticut children to receive free admission to all state museums during the summer months of 2021.

“This program offers children a unique opportunity to enjoy the world-class museums and attractions offered in Connecticut, while having an experience that is both fun and educational. Museums are centers of exploration, recreation and learning, and will play an important role in helping to provide opportunities for socio-emotional growth, mental health and education that were limited during the pandemic. I hope families take advantage of this unique opportunity that comes to Connecticut this summer, ”Lamont said in a statement.

Some of the participating museums include the Connecticut Science Center, Beardsley Zoo, Maritime Aquarium, Mystic Aquarium, and Mystic Seaport Museum.

More than ninety state museums are participating in this year’s program.

The program was originally proposed by the governor earlier in the year and is funded by a portion of the revenue the state received from the COVID stimulus fund.

The program runs July 1 through September 6 and applies to Connecticut children ages eighteen and under.

Eligible persons must be accompanied by at least one adult.

For a list of museums, click here.

Copyright 2021 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.


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Museums Aotearoa executive director leaves annual meeting https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-aotearoa-executive-director-leaves-annual-meeting/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/museums-aotearoa-executive-director-leaves-annual-meeting/ The executive director of Museums Aotearoa resigned within a week of the annual meeting of the national organization and two months after the resignation of its entire board of directors. On Friday, the independent trade association representing public museums and galleries said in a statement that Phillipa Tocker, who served as executive director for 16 […]]]>

The executive director of Museums Aotearoa resigned within a week of the annual meeting of the national organization and two months after the resignation of its entire board of directors.

On Friday, the independent trade association representing public museums and galleries said in a statement that Phillipa Tocker, who served as executive director for 16 years, was stepping down immediately.

His resignation and previous departures from the board signaled the implosion of the industry, a museum expert said.

“The perception must be that the sector cannot pull itself together,” said Conal McCarthy, professor of museum and heritage studies at Victoria University of Wellington. “It’s volatile, hectic and couldn’t be worse timing given that there was very little in the budget for culture and heritage.”

READ MORE:
* The director of the Wellington Museum is going through a restructuring process
* The entire board of Aotearoa museums resigns abruptly
* Who should Te Papa choose to run the national museum?

Phillipa Tocker, executive director of Aotearoa Museums, right, has resigned after 16 years.

PROVIDED

Phillipa Tocker, executive director of Aotearoa Museums, right, has resigned after 16 years.

In April, the full board of Museums Aotearoa resigned due to concerns about the management of the organization.

After their departure, a new interim board of six was elected. They were working towards the annual meeting next week. But on Friday, the organization abruptly announced that Tocker had also resigned.

“The past year has challenged everyone everywhere and Covid-19 has had a profound global effect, much of which remains to be understood. As such, this is the right time for me to step aside and for Museums Aotearoa to move forward in this new and evolving context, ”Tocker said in an emailed statement.

THING

The Canterbury Museum has grown over the past 150 years. (Video first published October 9, 2020)

Thing attempted to reach new Aotearoa Museum Acting Co-Chairs Eloise Wallace and Tui Te Hau over the past few days.

In a statement, Wallace said Tocker has made a substantial contribution to the organization and to the industry.

“She more than doubled the number of members, established our annual conference and awards, has advocated relentlessly for legislative changes and cost savings for members and supported the industry during the lockdown and beyond,” said Wallace, who was appointed last month.

Te Hau said the past 18 months have highlighted the “resilience” of the sector and the importance of taking care of the country’s taonga. She said Tocker was leaving the organization in a “position of strength”.

Provisional Council of Aotearoa Museums, from left Paora Tibble, Eloise Wallace, Amber Aranui, Tui Te Hau, Lucinda Blackley-Jimson and Ian Griffin.

AOTEAROA MUSEUMS

Provisional Council of Aotearoa Museums, from left Paora Tibble, Eloise Wallace, Amber Aranui, Tui Te Hau, Lucinda Blackley-Jimson and Ian Griffin.

But McCarthy said this was the third time the museum sector has “imploded”, the others being in the 1980s and 1990s.

“It’s a bit of déjà vu to see this happen again, unfortunately. I hope that the museum sector will emerge more unified and stronger, and that it will find at the level of governance the best way to function and to engage with stakeholders and the government. This is not a good look.

At next week’s meeting, elections for a new permanent council will be held. It is not known if an executive director will also be appointed.

Tocker did not respond to a request for comment on Friday.


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