Marlborough museums – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 02:46:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough museums – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 Former Mackenzie High Country research cabins turned into mini-museums https://marlborough-monaco.com/former-mackenzie-high-country-research-cabins-turned-into-mini-museums/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/former-mackenzie-high-country-research-cabins-turned-into-mini-museums/ Three humble huts that once housed scientists, soil and a young family have been lovingly restored to take on a new role on a Mackenzie High Country station. The former Department of Scientific and Industrial Research huts will serve as a historic touch stop for walkers on the Glentanner Station Heli-Hike, the Ivey family’s latest […]]]>

Three humble huts that once housed scientists, soil and a young family have been lovingly restored to take on a new role on a Mackenzie High Country station.

The former Department of Scientific and Industrial Research huts will serve as a historic touch stop for walkers on the Glentanner Station Heli-Hike, the Ivey family’s latest chain of tourist offerings on their 4,000-acre property bordering Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park.

The cabins were officially reopened on Thursday with honored guests Josiane Archer, 91, and her son Robert.

The Iveys worked with an exhibit design firm to develop information panels, photographs and audio recordings based on interviews, research and historical documents that now hang in the cabins, and restored decor, carefully preserved furniture and memorabilia.

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Huts at the unpowered field station housed scientists and researchers, including the late soil scientist Anthony (Tony) Archer, who died in 2010.

He lived and worked in the huts for weeks on end for almost two decades, with his wife Josiane and their children Robert and Nicole.

Robert and Josiane Archer at the launch of the renovation work on the country cabins at Glentanner station.  Department of Scientific and Industrial Research scientist Tony Archer has completed his doctorate on grassland and hut upland soil management, with his young family spending many months with him.

Glentanner station/provided

Robert and Josiane Archer at the launch of the renovation work on the country cabins at Glentanner station. Department of Scientific and Industrial Research scientist Tony Archer has completed his doctorate on grassland and hut upland soil management, with his young family spending many months with him.

Robert said he and his sister spent many happy months in the huts as children.

He said Thursday’s launch was quite emotional for him and his mother.

“It was a great place to grow up.”

He had fond memories of their time at Glentanner – long-drop toilets, off-grid living, boiling water for baths, strong winds and “learning and figuring out what Dad was doing”.

“It was a very big part of Dad’s scientific career, and our whole life quite frankly.”

He said the Iveys were very kind to the family, and he particularly remembers his father and Ian Ivey being an unlikely pair.

“Dad was a bit mad as a mad academic to be fair, and Ian was the tough mountain man who made his money shooting deer in Rakaia Gorge to buy the Glentanner resort, so it was an interesting interaction between these guys. .

“I vividly remember sitting in the farmhouse listening to the two discuss.”

Archer said the launch of the field station cabins reinforced the importance of her father’s work in grassland management and soil science, while Josiane said the visit brought back memories.

“They had all the crockery we used and the pots and pans still there, beautifully hung up and ready to go, the bed below was the same, even the same curtains, which must have been 50 years old.”

The family left New Zealand in 1982 when her husband was posted to Pakistan with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

When they returned in 2000, the first place Tony went was Glentanner, Josiane said.

Glentanner station co-owner Helen Ivey said the huts feature stories about Glentanner’s early scientific and agricultural endeavors, and the relationship between farmer and scientist.

“It’s also about the relationship between the Archers and the Ivey family. Because the Ivey family was doing the development of the farm basically at the same time as they were doing the research, so there was a lot of communication between the two, and they became great family friends.

Josiane Archer, 91, seen here in a helicopter en route to the launch event, lived and worked alongside her husband Anthony Archer, a renowned soil scientist who spent time living in small A-frame huts on Glentanner station with his family.

Helen Ivey / Stuff

Josiane Archer, 91, seen here in a helicopter en route to the launch event, lived and worked alongside her husband Anthony Archer, a renowned soil scientist who spent time living in small A-frame huts on Glentanner station with his family.

She said one of the huts served as a “home base,” another held soil samples, and the third was the office, which also housed additional bunks for researchers.

“We kept it as is, but we added a bit of interpretation and quite a few photos, and we have the audio of Josiane and Robert talking.”

“They would come up and do the work and the research, look at the storylines and what had happened since their last visit, take the tapes, and that would go on for a while, and then they would go back to Lincoln.”

She said Archer’s influential 1976 doctoral dissertation, Pedogenesis and vegetation trends in the elefulvic and eldefulvic zones of the northeast Ben Ohau Range, New Zealand, meticulously typed by Josiane, was one of the results of Archer’s high country research.

The huts are part of a new tourist venture on Glentanner station where hikers hop on and off by helicopter, stopping at the huts for a tea break.  (File photo)

Brook Sabin / Stuff

The huts are part of a new tourist venture on Glentanner station where hikers hop on and off by helicopter, stopping at the huts for a tea break. (File photo)

Ivey said the idea of ​​the helicopter ride occurred during the Covid-19 lockdown.

“I thought for God’s sake, what are we going to do? We have this track, let’s use it – the first season we had around 500 people, so it was very popular.

Hikers are transported by helicopter to a high point on the sprawling property overlooking Lake Pukaki, then descend on foot.

“They walk about two hours before they get to these huts, so we stop for a little morning or afternoon tea. We thought this was definitely something we could add to the hike to make it more interesting.”

Outgoing Mackenzie Mayor Graham Smith helped with the launch, taking the tougher route – walking the two hours to shelters from the start of the hike.

The hut exhibits were a great initiative, he said.

“I take my hat off to the Iveys. I’ve always said it’s about telling the stories of the Mackenzie – there are so many to tell. It’s not just about the mountains, it’s about the people and the history and sharing those stories,” he said.

Glentanner resort has been run by the Ivey family since 1957. The huge high mountain track at the entrance to Aoraki Mount Cook National Park has long branched out into tourism.

Besides sheep, cattle, cattle, deer herding and finishing, a merino stud farm and farming, the Iveys have several tourist offerings, including the Glentanner Holiday Park with motel units, campsites and motorized, and a base for fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter flights. .

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Man knocks down ancient Roman busts in Vatican Museums https://marlborough-monaco.com/man-knocks-down-ancient-roman-busts-in-vatican-museums/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 13:45:29 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/man-knocks-down-ancient-roman-busts-in-vatican-museums/ By Philippe Pullella VATICAN CITY (Reuters) – A man knocked over two ancient Roman busts in the Vatican museums on Wednesday, causing moderate damage before being stopped by staff and arrested, a museum source said. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation, said the […]]]>

By Philippe Pullella

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) – A man knocked over two ancient Roman busts in the Vatican museums on Wednesday, causing moderate damage before being stopped by staff and arrested, a museum source said.

The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation, said the man was in his 50s and had been “behaving strangely”.

He knocked two busts off their pedestals in the museum’s Chiaramonti room, which houses more than 1,000 pieces and is one of the most important collections of Roman busts.

Museum staff restrained the man and Vatican police arrived minutes later to arrest him.

Both busts were damaged but not badly, the source said, adding that they had already been taken to the museums restoration lab for repair.

Photos taken by visitors and posted on social media showed the two broken busts lying on the marble floor.

After having to close or reduce opening hours during years of COVID restrictions, museums are now welcoming tourists in droves. Museums received some six million visitors a year before the pandemic.

The most notorious assault on artwork in the Vatican took place in 1972 when a Hungarian jumped over a side altar in St. Peter’s Basilica and attacked Michelangelo’s Pietà with a hammer. He knocked off the Madonna’s left arm and chipped her nose and veil.

This Renaissance masterpiece is now behind bulletproof glass.

(Reporting by Philip Pullella; Editing by Alexandra Hudson)

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7 of the best Hudson Valley museums to visit | Arts | Hudson Valley https://marlborough-monaco.com/7-of-the-best-hudson-valley-museums-to-visit-arts-hudson-valley/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/7-of-the-best-hudson-valley-museums-to-visit-arts-hudson-valley/ Click to enlarge While art might not be the first thing a visitor to the region thinks of, the Hudson Valley and the Berkshires have a connection to American creative endeavor that dates back to Thomas Cole and Frederic Church. What was once just a home and place of respite and inspiration for artists is […]]]>
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While art might not be the first thing a visitor to the region thinks of, the Hudson Valley and the Berkshires have a connection to American creative endeavor that dates back to Thomas Cole and Frederic Church. What was once just a home and place of respite and inspiration for artists is now home to world-class art institutions, from the Dia: Beacon and Storm King Art Center to the Center for Curatorial Studies/Hessel Bard College Museum. As the weather gets colder, it’s a great time to head inside and get acquainted with the amazing works of art on display in the area.

magazine | cold spring

The house built by Arte Povera, Magazine has brought influential Italian artists from this influential art movement of the 1960s and 1970s to its modernist museum in Cold Spring since it opened in 2017. Until January 9, the fascinating “Carpets of Nature” (pusher-natura) by Pietro Gilardi, one of the main protagonists of Arte Povera. By sculpting natural scenes in man-made materials like polyurethane foam and then saturating them with synthetic pigments, Gilardi sought to recreate nature in an uncontaminated form. Some of the pieces, in particular a couple depicting seabirds flying low over the water, are breathtakingly beautiful.

The Hyde Collection | Glens Falls

A private museum with a distinguished collection of European and American art, Hyde’s collections were acquired by museum founders Louis and Charlotte Hyde in the early 20th century and include works by El Greco, Rembrandt, Peter Paul Rubens, Edgar Degas, Georges Seurat, Winslow Homer, Josef Albers, Grace Hartigan, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Robert Motherwell, Robert Rauschenberg and Bridget Riley. In addition to its permanent collection, the hyde hosts rotating exhibitions. Through December 31, “Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region” is presented, a juried exhibition featuring regional artists.

Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center | Poughkeepsie

Located on the campus of Vassar College, the Loeb is an educational museum whose permanent collection includes more than 22,000 works, made up of paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, textiles, glass and ceramics. This fall, the museum is offering four exhibitions open to the public, including the following. “Ways of Unseeing in Photography” explores the ways photographs can darken the world as much as they can illuminate it and includes photographs by artists such as Todd Hido, Eikoh Hosoe, André Kertész, Abelardo Morell, Billy Name and Alisa Wells – Witteman. “Redefining Feminism at the Women’s Studio Workshop” documents the collaborative art-making space that was launched in Rosendale in 1974 and continues to this day as a vibrant studio for women-identifying artists. Women’s Studio Workshop specializes in the production of artists’ books, and a selection from this collection will be on display.

Samuel Dorsky Museum | New Paltz

Located on the SUNY New Paltz campus, the Dorsky includes over 9,000 square feet of exhibition space spread across six galleries. While the museum’s permanent collection contains more than 6,000 works of art from around the world, the focus is on the Hudson Valley and Catskill Mountain region, 19th-century American prints, photography and contemporary metals. Dorsky’s program of temporary exhibitions features exhibitions, installations and projects by internationally renowned artists as well as annual thematic exhibitions of works by regional artists. “Benjamin Wigfall & Communications Village,” on view until December 11, explores the legacy of the printmaker and educator and the black arts community he nurtured in Kingston in the 1970s and 1980s.

Clark Art Institute | Williamstown

The Berkshires owe a Cold War debt for the location of its most important art museum. Having amassed a superb private art collection, the Clarks, who lived in New York, became increasingly concerned for the safety of their works as tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union escalated in the late 1940s. Williamstown, 170 miles from the theoretical nuclear blast zone, was deemed a safe destination for a museum based on their collection, which includes European and American paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, photographs and decorative arts from the 14th to the beginning of the 20th century. “On the Horizon: Art and Atmosphere in the 19th Century”, on view at the clark from November 19 to February 12, features gems from the museum’s collection, including works by JMW Turner, John Constable, Honoré Daumier, Charles Meryon, James McNeill Whistler and Auguste Louis Lepère, among others.

Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art | Ridgefield, Connecticut

The Aldrichs is an impactful contemporary art museum located in leafy suburban Connecticut. This fall, one of its flagship exhibitions is getting a makeover. In 1971, Lucy R. Lippard curated the “Twenty-Six Contemporary Women Artists” exhibition at the Aldrich. The pageant featured emerging female artists (Howardena Pindell and Alice Aycock among them). Fifty-one years later, “52 Artists: A Feminist Milestone” features the original artists from the 1971 exhibition alongside a new list of 26 emerging, self-identifying or non-binary artists born after 1980, following the evolution feminist artistic practices over the past five decades. . Younger artists include Emile L. Gossiaux, Amaryllis DeJesus Moleski, Stella Zhong and Phoebe Berglund. Until January 8.

Norman Rockwell Museum | Stockbridge, MA

Perhaps the greatest commercial illustrator of the last century, a man whose name is synonymous with Saturday night post (he made 323 covers for the publication), Norman Rockwell is associated with a very particular strain of mid-20th century American life. It’s hard not to avoid the word “nostalgia” when discussing his work, as it evokes a small-town ethos that many yearn for. Rockwell, however, is not so simply written off, as his work addressed the social issues of the time, from his Four Freedoms series to his early Civil Rights Movement paintings. To see Rockwell’s work in person—often large-scale paintings that were shot for magazine covers—is to reckon with his technical mastery. The Norman Rockwell Museum houses the world’s largest public collection of Rockwell works, including original artwork, as well as the artist’s studio and related collection, including personal memorabilia, supplies and reference materials . He also mounts complementary exhibitions of contemporary illustration. “Eloise and More: The Life and Art of Hilary Knight,” opens Nov. 12 and runs through March 12.

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Enjoy Free Admission to These New England Museums in September https://marlborough-monaco.com/enjoy-free-admission-to-these-new-england-museums-in-september/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/enjoy-free-admission-to-these-new-england-museums-in-september/ Arts This event has passed. Find other things to do instead. The 18th annual Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day will take place on September 17. The Fruitlands Museum at Harvard. The fruit land museum Several New England museums will once again offer free single-day admission in September, thanks to Smithsonian Magazine18th edition museum day. The event […]]]>

Arts

  • This event has passed. Find other things to do instead.

The 18th annual Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day will take place on September 17.

The Fruitlands Museum at Harvard. The fruit land museum

Several New England museums will once again offer free single-day admission in September, thanks to Smithsonian Magazine18th edition museum day.

The event will take place on September 17 and will offer free admission to museums across the country. This year’s theme is “The American Experience”.

“We are thrilled to be able to bring Museum Day to the public for the 18th year and once again be able to shine a light on the many museums and cultural institutions that make America so special,” said Amy Wilkins, Chief Revenue Officer at Smithsonian. . Media, in a press release.

Customers can download tickets from the Smithsonian Magazine website from August 15. Each ticket entitles the ticket holder and one guest to free entry into the museum. One ticket is allowed per email address.

This year, the free museum day is sponsored by The Quaker Oats Company and Regent Seven Seas Cruises.

Here is a list of participating New England museums so far. It’s a good idea to check the list of participating museums for the most up-to-date attendees, as organizers say more museums will be added to the list.

Massachusetts:

Armenian Museum of America in Watertown
Beneski Museum of Natural History at Amherst College in Amherst
Davis Museum at Wellesley College in Wellesley
Fruitlands Museum at Harvard
Marconi-RCA Wireless Museum in North Chatham
Family Prayer Museum in Easton
Nichols House Museum in Boston
Springfield Museums in Springfield
The Gardner Museum in Gardner
Home of William Hickling Prescott in Boston

New Hampshire:

Albacore Park Submarine and Museum in Portsmouth
New Hampshire Telephone Museum at Warner
Wright World War II Museum in Wolfeboro

Rhode Island:

Babcock-Smith House Museum in Westerly
International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport
John Brown House Museum in Providence
Lippett House Museum in Providence
Museum of Labor and Culture at Woonsocket
Tomaquag Museum in Exeter

Vermont:

American Precision Museum in Windsor

Connecticut:

Danbury Railway Museum in Danbury
Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme
Henry Whitfield State Museum in Guilford
KidsPlay, Inc. Children’s Museum in Torrington
Prudence Crandall Museum in Canterbury
The New England Carousel Museum in Bristol

See more events

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Two St. Mary’s Museums Join Smithsonian Magazine’s Annual Museum Day https://marlborough-monaco.com/two-st-marys-museums-join-smithsonian-magazines-annual-museum-day/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/two-st-marys-museums-join-smithsonian-magazines-annual-museum-day/ LEONARDTOWN, Md. – St. Clement Island Museum and Piney Point Lighthouse Museum will open for free to anyone who downloads a Museum Day branded ticket on Saturday, September 17, 2022. The event is one of Smithsonian Magazine’s 18e Annual Museum Day, a national celebration of boundless curiosity. Participating museums mimic the free admission policy of […]]]>

LEONARDTOWN, Md. – St. Clement Island Museum and Piney Point Lighthouse Museum will open for free to anyone who downloads a Museum Day branded ticket on Saturday, September 17, 2022.

The event is one of Smithsonian Magazine’s 18e Annual Museum Day, a national celebration of boundless curiosity. Participating museums mimic the free admission policy of the museums of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

The annual event allows museums, zoos and cultural centers in all 50 states to join in the spirit of facilities at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, which offer free daily admission.

Museum Day goes beyond simply bringing visitors through the doors of the museum – it acts as a springboard to empower and help advance the hopes and ambitions of the public, especially children aged school and those from underrepresented communities.

It represents a national commitment to access, equity and inclusion. This year’s theme, The American Experiencehighlights wonderful exhibits on arts, culture, science, innovation and history across the country.

“Our museums have such a unique story to tell and being part of Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day helps us reach new audiences who may not have known about our sites before due to a variety of circumstances.” said Karen Stone, director of the St. Mary’s County Museum.

Those wishing to attend and participate in Museum Day 2022 can visit Smithsonianmag.com/museumday to find out more and download a Museum Day ticket from August 15, 2022.

Each ticket grants the ticket holder and one guest free access to any participating museum on September 17, 2022.

One ticket is allowed per email address. Please note that the St. Clement Island Museum ticket includes free admission to the museum, but NOT the water taxi, which will remain at $7.00 per person that day.

A list of participating museums is available at Smithsonianmag.com/museumday/search.

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These 13 Little Museums in Upstate New York Tell Incredible Stories https://marlborough-monaco.com/these-13-little-museums-in-upstate-new-york-tell-incredible-stories/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/these-13-little-museums-in-upstate-new-york-tell-incredible-stories/ While upstate New York is known nationwide for many of our most famous larger museums (think glass and baseball, for example), there are many smaller, “off the grid” museums. “, which also deserve your attention. This list presents 13 of them. Here we will describe some museums that you may not have heard of before. […]]]>

While upstate New York is known nationwide for many of our most famous larger museums (think glass and baseball, for example), there are many smaller, “off the grid” museums. “, which also deserve your attention. This list presents 13 of them.

Here we will describe some museums that you may not have heard of before. Like an Underground Railroad museum located within walking distance of one of the Adirondacks’ most popular natural sights. But many have missed this important museum. How about a museum dedicated to the very important musical instrument called the Kazoo? Yes, in western New York. And it’s a blast.

There is a great motorcycle museum on this list. Funniest of all is that this museum has two “walls of death”. Do you remember those from the old county fairs? The motorcycles climbed higher and higher, going faster and faster inside a silo. We watched wide-eyed as they got so close to the top we could almost touch them. How did they do this? Check it out on this list.

Another favorite is a Finger Lakes museum which is dedicated to a movie. Not just any old movie either. This movie has often been named the most beloved American Christmas movie of all time. Find out why this small upstate village has a museum for this movie. It’s fascinating.

We hope you enjoy this list. Of course, there are many other smaller museums that we will visit on this page in the future. But for now, go, explore, and enjoy these 13 “off-the-grid museums” in upstate New York.

Don’t miss these 13 amazing (and off the grid) museums in upstate New York!

Upstate New York is famous for its nationally renowned museums, such as the Corning Museum of Glass or the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. But there are plenty of other smaller, lesser-known museums that any visitor should put on their upstate New York to-do-and-see list.

Here is a list of 13 museums you may not know about. Some are quirky, some are important, some are fun, some are, how shall we say, “out there”. But all of them deserve a visit from you soon!

Eat! Check out these amazing Italian bakeries in upstate New York!

Everyone loves an Italian bakery or pastry, and these are some of the best upstate!

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British Columbia’s Royal Museums drop demolition plan https://marlborough-monaco.com/british-columbias-royal-museums-drop-demolition-plan/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/british-columbias-royal-museums-drop-demolition-plan/ The demolition and reconstruction plan Royal British Columbia Museum was suspended on Wednesday. CBC News reports that British Columbia Premier John Horgan make the announcement at a press conference where he said the $789 million development unveiled last month was the “wrong move at the wrong time”. A poll released by the Angus Reid Institute […]]]>

The demolition and reconstruction plan Royal British Columbia Museum was suspended on Wednesday. CBC News reports that British Columbia Premier John Horgan make the announcement at a press conference where he said the $789 million development unveiled last month was the “wrong move at the wrong time”. A poll released by the Angus Reid Institute last month found that 69% of British Columbians were against what would have been the costliest museum project ever undertaken in Canada. Horgan also said that although the museum would now remain open indefinitelyinstead of closing in September, it still backs a demolition and rebuild plan – as did Tourism Minister Melanie Mark who described the museum’s current state as ‘non-functional’.

A banner installed at Documenta 15 in Kassel, which opened this week, has been removed after much criticism in Germany for wearing anti-Semitic images. People’s Justice (2002), an 18-meter-long work by Indonesian art collective Taring Padi that reflects Suharto’s brutal regime, was installed last Friday. On Monday, artists and fair organizers concealed the artwork behind black. Padi setting denied any anti-Semitic intent and apologized for “the harm caused in this context”. After further criticism from, among others, German Culture Minister Claudia Roth, Documenta director Sabine Schormann announced on Tuesday that she and the event’s curators, ruangrupa, have decided to withdraw the ‘work. A spokesman for German Chancellor Olaf Scholz told the Judische Allgemeine that he would not be visiting Kassel this year, although he “probably hasn’t missed a Documenta in the past 30 years”. Ruangrupa was accused of anti-Semitism in the German media on several occasions in the months leading up to the exhibition – allegations the collective has vehemently denied.

A marble head, thought to represent Hercules, has been recovered by archaeologists of a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera. The Roman-era freighter was discovered in 1901; among the statues, ceramics and glassware unearthed by the divers were the astronomical device known as the Antikythera Mechanism, often described as the world’s first analog computer, and the body of the statue of Hercules, today now in the collection of the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. In Saxony, meanwhile, an illustration supposed to be of Albrecht Durer was identified in a book from the Oldenburg State Library. The ancient Greek text published by the Venetian printer Aldus Manutius in 1502, has been part of the library’s collections since 1791; the drawing was identified by researchers during a recent inventory audit.

Jérôme Sans, co-founder of the Palais de Tokyo in Paris with Nicolas Bourriaud, had been named as the first creative director of Lake/Algo, a new cultural center in Chapultepec Park in Mexico City. The centre, described as a ‘laboratory of social and cultural models’, is part of a project costing around 1bn pesos (£368m) to redesign Chapultepec Park, led by the artist Gabriel Orozco; critics have questioned the artist’s oversight of so much of the nation’s federal arts budget. In Ottawa, Angela Cassie had been named interim director and CEO of National Gallery of Canada, succeeding Sasha Suda who is leaving for the Philadelphia Museum of Art. And Noah Davisdigital sales manager at Christie’s who led the sale of a work by Beeple for $69.3 million, said announcement that he is leaving the auction house to work as a brand manager for CryptoPunks, an NFT collection owned by Yuga Labs.

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Scarborough Museums Trust and Woodend merge to form Scarborough Museums and Galleries https://marlborough-monaco.com/scarborough-museums-trust-and-woodend-merge-to-form-scarborough-museums-and-galleries/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/scarborough-museums-trust-and-woodend-merge-to-form-scarborough-museums-and-galleries/ Managing Director of Scarborough Museums and Galleries Andrew Clay in the rotunda The newly formed organization will provide an exciting range of creative and cultural activities for Scarborough residents and visitors to the Yorkshire coast. At the center will be the Rotunda Museum of Coastal Heritage and Geology, the Scarborough Art Gallery, the Woodend Gallery […]]]>
Managing Director of Scarborough Museums and Galleries Andrew Clay in the rotunda

The newly formed organization will provide an exciting range of creative and cultural activities for Scarborough residents and visitors to the Yorkshire coast. At the center will be the Rotunda Museum of Coastal Heritage and Geology, the Scarborough Art Gallery, the Woodend Gallery and Studios and the 250,000 objects in Scarborough’s collections.

Managing Director of Scarborough Museums and Galleries, Andrew Clay, said: “Our main aim is to provide a first-class cultural experience for the citizens of Scarborough.

“We have three remarkable Grade II listed buildings and a collection that reflects 200 million years of local history.

“Over time, we want to make sure that as many people as possible have access to a timeline that starts with the dinosaurs and along the way includes the 4,000-year-old Gristhorpe man, ancient Greek and Roman gold coins, the macabre dodging medieval stool, Victorian paintings, contemporary art and a fascinating collection of ephemera and social history, not to mention 80,000 insect specimens.

“We are also committed to supporting Scarborough’s creative industries and promoting this important contribution to the local economy – we currently employ 20 people.”

“Scarborough Museums and Galleries are just getting started and are already engaged in a number of important projects.

“We recently secured £256,000 for the restoration of the rotunda facade and the From Local to Global project explores aspects of collecting in a colonial context. We also engage members of the local community through our new volunteer program.

Future plans include the renovation of the Scarborough Art Gallery and a “Museum on the Main Street” which will begin with the Fossil Festival in September.

In addition, a new website has been launched which will allow schools and families to access a wide range of learning activities.

Coffee, cakes and delicious food are also available at Sitwell by Eat Me which opened in Woodend last year.

Mike Greene, chief executive of Scarborough Borough Council, said: “Scarborough is a cultural powerhouse on the Yorkshire coast.

“The creation of Scarborough’s new museums and galleries is a welcome development and will contribute enormously to the council’s ambition to expand cultural offerings throughout the year.

“We very much look forward to working with the museum and the galleries as it develops its own plans for the future.”

The Rotunda Museums and Scarborough Art Gallery are open 10am-5pm Tuesday-Sunday, plus Bank Holiday Monday. Admission is free with the purchase of a £3 annual pass (not required for under 18s). Admission to the Woodend Gallery is free; it is open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The Sitwell by Eat Me Café is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Carnegie Museums Hires Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Accessibility https://marlborough-monaco.com/carnegie-museums-hires-vice-president-for-inclusion-diversity-equity-and-accessibility/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/carnegie-museums-hires-vice-president-for-inclusion-diversity-equity-and-accessibility/ Gina Winstead, a native of McKeesport, has been hired by Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh to fill her newly created role as Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility (IDEA). Winstead will join the organization on July 1. She previously worked for Vibrant Pittsburgh, a regional workplace diversity leader, as assistant vice president of membership […]]]>

Gina Winstead, a native of McKeesport, has been hired by Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh to fill her newly created role as Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility (IDEA). Winstead will join the organization on July 1.

She previously worked for Vibrant Pittsburgh, a regional workplace diversity leader, as assistant vice president of membership development and external relations.

Winstead said there’s been a feeling in the past that some patrons of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh don’t always feel as welcome and included as others.

The focus will be, she said, on retaining underrepresented employees and “uplifting” them.

“This is an organization with deep roots in Pittsburgh,” Winstead said. “…This role will do a lot of work to ensure that the community is engaged, and that those who have already done this work are supported by a leader who has some accountability, to ensure that inclusion is mainstreamed in the founding of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.

Steven Knapp, president and CEO of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, called Winstead the “ideal” person to fill the new role.

“I am grateful to the staff who make up our IDEA Council for recommending the creation of this position, and I look forward to the progress I know we will make with Gina’s thoughtful and inspiring guidance,” Knapp said.

Winstead graduated from the University of Pittsburgh and attended Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business.

She sits on the boards of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. She was a founding board member of the 412 Black Jewish Collaborative and a member of the Allegheny Conference Talent Committee.

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Leslie Mendelson at Radio Woodstock | Museums | Hudson Valley https://marlborough-monaco.com/leslie-mendelson-at-radio-woodstock-museums-hudson-valley/ Tue, 31 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/leslie-mendelson-at-radio-woodstock-museums-hudson-valley/ Click to enlarge As the next installment in his Steeple Sessions live concert series, Radio Woodstock will welcome Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Leslie Mendelson to its Woodstock studios on June 11. Currently on tour to support If you can’t say anything nice…, her latest album on Royal Potato Family Records, Mendelson recorded duets with Jackson […]]]>

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As the next installment in his Steeple Sessions live concert series, Radio Woodstock will welcome Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Leslie Mendelson to its Woodstock studios on June 11.

Currently on tour to support If you can’t say anything nice…, her latest album on Royal Potato Family Records, Mendelson recorded duets with Jackson Browne and Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead and opened two shows for The Who at Madison Square Garden (she was to open three more before the pandemic forced their postponement). Marked by all music for his “1970s songwriter influences in the vein of Carole King and Carly Simon” and hailed by Relix for her “loyal, cross-generational audience that embraces hippies, hipsters, coffeeshops and societal crowds”, she earned a Grammy nomination for her debut album in 2009, swan feathers. The most recent of Mendelson’s discography is Waitinga solo acoustic EP she recorded during the 2020 lockdown.

Radio Woodstock’s intimate, limited-seat Steeple Sessions concerts take place at the station’s premises in a former Woodstock church; live tickets are also available through the Flymachine streaming platform, which allows users to watch the performance as a shared experience in private virtual rooms with their friends.

Leslie Mendelson will perform for Radio Woodstock’s live Steeple series on June 11 at 7 p.m. In-person tickets are $20; live passes are $10.

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