Marlborough masterpiece – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:27:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough masterpiece – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 First Film About Lincoln Memorial Sculptor Daniel Chester French | Berkshire landscapes https://marlborough-monaco.com/first-film-about-lincoln-memorial-sculptor-daniel-chester-french-berkshire-landscapes/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/first-film-about-lincoln-memorial-sculptor-daniel-chester-french-berkshire-landscapes/ STOCKBRIDGE – “Finally!” Filmmaker Eduardo Montes-Bradley likes to get closer to his subject – “When I ‘visited’ French at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord and touched his gravestone, that’s where I ‘promised’ him. that I would make a movie. “ PHOTO PROVIDED BY EDUARDO MONTES-BRADLEY That was Donna Hassler’s exclamation as the first film about […]]]>

STOCKBRIDGE – “Finally!”






Man sitting on gravestone

Filmmaker Eduardo Montes-Bradley likes to get closer to his subject – “When I ‘visited’ French at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord and touched his gravestone, that’s where I ‘promised’ him. that I would make a movie. “




That was Donna Hassler’s exclamation as the first film about Lincoln Memorial sculptor Daniel Chester French goes into production, written, directed and produced by veteran documentary maker Eduardo Montes-Bradley.

“It is surprising that there was no previous documentary,” said Hassler, executive director of the Chesterwood historic house, museum and sculpture garden, which she called “a sleeping giant who needed to be rethought and awakened”.

“My important role here has been to increase the visibility and profile of French and Chesterwood through various traveling exhibitions, articles and a definitive biography,” she said. “A movie was one of those things that waited backstage. Now we are the key advisor on production, and there are a lot of resources here. “

Chesterwood, run by Hassler for 13 years, was French’s home and studio from May to October 1897 until his death in 1931. There he carved the Lincoln Memorial in plaster. The 6-foot-tall sculpture of the seated Lincoln statue was the model used to create the marble version in the nation’s capital and remains a major attraction in the museum’s collection.

Montes-Bradley, with more than 40 titles to his name, wondered if the crowds that flocked to the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, were aware of the statue’s origin.

“In September, when I went to interview visitors, no one knew who Daniel Chester French was,” Montes-Bradley told The Eagle from his home in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Hassler agrees: “Most people will say this is their favorite monument, but if you ask them who the sculptor was, they don’t know because people don’t ask that question and they are interested in it. learn more about Lincoln.

She noted that there is no plaque or signage indicating that the sculpture of the seated figure was created by French. Hassler hopes the film will bring “a new perspective to his life, but also to his sensitivity as an artist who has created 100 monuments, starting with ‘The Tiny Man‘at Concord.

Argentinian-American filmmaker Montes-Bradley, 61, has spent the past 13 years in partnership with museums, other cultural institutions and community groups.

Its soberly titled “Daniel Chester French” must be completed in time for the celebration, on May 30, 2022, of the centennial of the Lincoln Memorial. French’s masterpiece will be dedicated again at this Memorial Day event.

Fundraising continues for the film; its world premiere is expected at a location in South Berkshire on Memorial Day weekend, Hassler said.

Montes-Bradley said he was inspired by a suggestion from his friend, collaborator and scholar Daniel Preston, whom he met while working on a documentary on James Monroe, the fifth US president (1817-1825) and the last of the founding fathers. .

The filmmaker visited Chesterwood three times last summer, including a two-week residency at Meadowlark, the sculptor’s second studio later converted into a cottage, accompanied by Preston, for a deep immersion into the sculptor’s life and work.

“I’ve learned over the years that it’s fundamental to rely on the editors for any topic you work on,” said Montes-Bradley. Preston, who edited the Monroe Papers, did the same for French’s letters, papers and notes, working with Michael Richman, the sculptor’s first biographer.

“As I walked through the Chesterwood studio, the house and the woods, it was important for me geographically to understand what kind of place it is, and it was back then,” noted Montes-Bradley. “The whole idea of ​​the French moving to the region was based on his search for a bucolic retreat.”

The Cottager | Chesterwood: Studio, cottage illustrate Daniel Chester French was the decisive man

The filmmaker also focused on the nearby village of Stockbridge of Glendale, a 19th-century industrial center and the site of a paper mill that eventually burned down, as well as a church (now a private home) frequented by French people.

“Finding out more about the Lincoln Memorial introduces you to many different rabbit burrows, because that’s what a documentary is!” said Montes-Bradley.

The film is budgeted at $ 89,250, with over $ 36,000 in major support so far from Chesterwood, which is owned and operated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The effort received a boost of $ 20,000 from the Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund of New York City, which resulted from “a drink at the Red Lion Inn with the right person,” Montes-Bradley said.

Moving on to full production, he described “needing a plot, knowing what story I want to tell, and then finding out who the main actors are.”

They include Richman biographer Harold Holzer, the second Abraham Lincoln biographer and scholar, and New Marlborough artist Shawn Fields, who illustrated Linda Booth Sweeney’s children’s book, “Monument Maker: Daniel Chester French and the Lincoln Memorial ”.

The film’s arc will show how the Lincoln Memorial, with its seated sculpture of Lincoln in deep contemplation, became “the sanctuary of American democracy,” Montes-Bradley said, noting his role as a focal point in the struggle for them. civil rights, anti-Vietnam War protests and the feminist movement.

According to the National Park Service, the 24-hour memorial was visited by nearly eight million people a year from 2015 to 2019. A $ 25 million restoration began in 2018 and is nearing completion.

The film will be distributed by Kanopy, an on-demand streaming service aimed at public and university libraries, but also accessible to the general public with a library card or university ID. A 10-minute version is in production for the Chesterwood website, likely by the end of the year, and the completed film will be shown at film festivals and then appear on YouTube later in 2022.

The project is particularly personal for Montes-Bradley, an 11th generation Argentinian descendant of the inhabitants of New England who emigrated there shortly after the publication of the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, strengthening the South American nations fighting the powers. European colonial regimes.

It’s a one-man band.

“I’m a bully,” he jokes. The shooting takes place between 1 and 5 a.m. at home, in my pajamas, in front of my computer. This is where the magic happens.

“It will be one of my most successful experiences,” he predicted, “as it coincides with the 100th anniversary of the installation of the Lincoln Memorial. The only challenge here is to be faithful to the man, to the French. I don’t want to betray his courage, his reputation. Sometimes I think maybe I betrayed him by trying to make him famous when he didn’t want to be.

How to be faithful?

“I have to listen very carefully to what his article editors, art historians and biographers think of him, and then draw my own conclusions,” Montes-Bradley said. “If I’m honest with them and with myself, then I think we’re honoring Daniel Chester French.”


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Blenheim Palace will become Winter Wonderland https://marlborough-monaco.com/blenheim-palace-will-become-winter-wonderland/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/blenheim-palace-will-become-winter-wonderland/ For those looking for a nice Christmas outing with family or friends, Blenheim Palace offers a triple festive pleasure between November 19 and January 2, 2022.Discover the palace’s ceremonial rooms transformed into the Nutcracker fairy tale workshops.Enjoy a traditional Christmas market in the courtyard with wooden chalets welcoming handpicked artisans.Be surrounded by over a million […]]]>

For those looking for a nice Christmas outing with family or friends, Blenheim Palace offers a triple festive pleasure between November 19 and January 2, 2022.
Discover the palace’s ceremonial rooms transformed into the Nutcracker fairy tale workshops.
Enjoy a traditional Christmas market in the courtyard with wooden chalets welcoming handpicked artisans.
Be surrounded by over a million twinkling lights, colorful trees and incredible illuminated installations, all choreographed to a much loved seasonal music soundtrack as you follow the illuminated outdoor trail.

• The story of The Nutcracker reinvented for Britain’s greatest palace
Explore the palace’s pageantry rooms, each exquisitely transformed and filled with hidden surprises – from the toymaker’s workshop on a frosty Christmas Eve; across the glistening snow country and over the barley sugar candy realm adorned with the sweetest candy and larger than life gingerbread men. It’s a fairytale world where nothing is quite as it seems, from a dashing Nutcracker Prince and an army of mice to a Sugar Plum Fairy and a music box with a difference. This fantastic winter wonderland is where the magic really begins….

• Welcome the return of the Blenheim Palace Christmas market
Taking place in the beautiful setting of the Baroque Oxfordshire Palace, visitors can escape the hustle and bustle of the main street and soak up the Christmas atmosphere at the Christmas market which returns from November 19 to December 19, 2021. The traditional wooden chalets will present a range of festive delicacies from creators and artisans producing food and drinks.

• Christmas at Blenheim Palace – Illuminated Trail
The illuminated trail returns but follows a brand new route that takes you through the southern lawn and into the woods beyond. Watch the moon and stars reflecting off the lake – as the constellations seem closer than ever, the firework trees sparkle with lights bursting from the undergrowth and along the branches. There are stars and balls where you least expect it, a rainbow effect in the laser garden and, for the first time in the UK, a new installation by French light artists TILT, Bloom will rise high in the night sky. With favorites like the Water Terrace Fire Garden and the Return of the Light Tunnel, this will be a picture perfect.

Christmas at Blenheim Palace offers a special way to celebrate the holiday season with an experience not to be missed. Tickets sell out quickly, book now to avoid disappointment: https://christmasatblenheim.com

There will be photocall opportunities when the Christmas Lights Trail opens on Thursday, November 18. Send an email to matt@flamingo-marketing.co.uk for more information.

Admission: Limited capacity with scheduled admission, early booking recommended
Combined tickets from: Adult £ 50, Reduced price: £ 48.50, Child (3-16 years) £ 30,
Family £ 140 (2 adults and 2 children). Parking: £ 10.
Annual Pass holders *: Adult £ 21.50, Child (3-16 years) £ 15,
Family £ 70 (2 adults and 2 children). * The price applies for an entry into the Palace before 4:00 p.m.
Free entry for accompanying persons and children 2 years and under. Parking: £ 10.
Free entry to the Christmas market. Parking charges apply after 10:00 a.m.
For full prices and ticket information, visit blenheimpalace.com/christmas
Website: https://christmasatblenheim.com mychristmastrails – #christmasatblenheimpalace

Address: Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire. OX20 1UL

ENDS

For more information please contact:
Matt Dixon|matt@flamingo-marketing.co.uk|T: 01637 808220

Notes to Editors

• For details on pricing and booking, please visit: blenheimpalace.com/christmas
• For more information on COVID19 and to book tickets with confidence, visit: https://mychristmastrails.co.uk/covid-19/
• * Additional charges apply

Image credits
The Nutcracker Story by Culture Creative, Blenheim Palace 2021. Photo by Richard Haughton © Sony Music
Fire Garden by pa-BOOM, My Christmas Trails 2020. Photo by Richard Haughton © Sony Music

About Blenheim Palace
Blenheim Palace is the home of the 12th Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill. This 18th century Baroque architectural masterpiece boasts over 300 years of history and is a World Heritage Site, surrounded by over 2000 acres of landscaped grounds and formal ‘Capability Brown’ gardens.
Not only an iconic part of history, Blenheim Palace is a lively and changing experience with a plethora of events, themed tours, and exhibits throughout the year.

blenheimpalace.com | FB @BlenheimPalace | Twitter @BlenheimPalace

About Sony Music
Sony Music has been offering lit Christmas trails for over eight years. Each trail is carefully designed to showcase the natural and unique environment of the individual location. There are currently 22 trails in UK, Europe, USA and Australia in the My Christmas Trails and Lightscape portfolios.

The partners chosen for national and international heritage and prestigious places are: Blenheim Palace; The National Trust; Forestry England; The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh; Botanic Gardens, Chicago, United States and Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

mychristmastrails.co.uk | FB @mychristmastrails | Twitter @mychristmastrails

About Creative Culture
Culture Creative is a creative project management and production company based in the North East of England. The company works in a wide range of cultural fields including art, sports, heritage, tourism, festivals and events, developing projects from concept to delivery. Since 2013, Culture Creative has worked closely with Sony Music to create illuminated journeys in various venues in the UK and abroad.

www.culturecreative.co.uk | FB @culturecreativeltd | Tw


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Dan Ricciardo’s awkward TV moment with Ellen DeGeneres https://marlborough-monaco.com/dan-ricciardos-awkward-tv-moment-with-ellen-degeneres/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 21:08:19 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/dan-ricciardos-awkward-tv-moment-with-ellen-degeneres/ Daniel Ricciardo was embarrassed during his appearance on The Ellen Show. Photo: Twitter @ TheEllenShow Written by Andrew Reid. This story originally appeared on Yahoo Sport Australia. Daniel Ricciardo found himself at the center of a fun moment during an interview with American TV superstar Ellen DeGeneres, ahead of Monday morning’s Mexican Grand Prix (AEDT). […]]]>

Daniel Ricciardo was embarrassed during his appearance on The Ellen Show. Photo: Twitter @ TheEllenShow

Written by Andrew Reid. This story originally appeared on Yahoo Sport Australia.

Daniel Ricciardo found himself at the center of a fun moment during an interview with American TV superstar Ellen DeGeneres, ahead of Monday morning’s Mexican Grand Prix (AEDT).

The Australian Formula 1 ace was a guest on Thursday’s episode of The Ellen DeGeneres Show, where he chatted with the host of the Netflix docu series Formula 1: Drive to Survive.

‘BURSTS’: Supercar driver banned amid vaccination controversy

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“HOLY COW”: The world is in disbelief at the “insane” scenes of the United States GP

Ellen admitted the series made her an unexpected F1 fan as Ricciardo answered some of her sports questions in front of the studio audience.

One question in particular made the charismatic 32-year-old laugh, who explained the grueling nature of being behind the wheel for up to two hours in some races.

“When you get out, you’re just wet, sweaty. It’s crazy, ”Ellen began to say.

“You don’t even have time to think, ‘I’m thirsty’ or something. You can’t even think about it.

“What if you feel like taking a pee?” How about drinking before getting in the car?

Ricciardo laughed: “It’s a question we often get asked: ‘Have you ever peed in the car?’

“Anyone can relate to peeing, you have to relax. And it’s hard to relax while driving at these speeds.

“I’ve never done it. If you have to go, you hang on painfully until the end, but every bump, every little sidewalk you hit hurts.

Seen here, Dan Ricciardo speaking to Ellen DeGeneres on her TV show.

Dan Ricciardo spoke to Ellen DeGeneres ahead of the upcoming Mexican Grand Prix. Photo: Twitter @ TheEllenShow

Ellen asked the Australian about the fitness regimes of F1 drivers, with Ricciardo explaining why core strength is crucial in the sport.

Ricciardo explained: “It’s intense. You’re right, a lot of people say, “Well, why do you need to be in shape? I drive my car to work every day and it’s a snap ”.

“The races are 90 minutes… there is something called the G forces and because we veer so fast, there are about four or five Gs on our body, and it’s a force that is basically trying to make us get out of the car.

“So we need a lot of core strength, neck strength to just hold on. And we can lose up to 8-10 pounds (3.5-4.5 kg) when running.

Max Verstappen responds to Daniel Ricciardo comparison

Ricciardo enters the Mexican GP eight in the drivers’ standings, with teammate McLaren Lando Norris ahead of him by 44 points.

The Australian’s former teammate Max Verstappen has denied suggestions that Ricciardo was the only rider who could match him in a Red Bull car after leaving ship in 2019.

The pair enjoyed a competitive relationship as the No.1 and No.2 drivers at Red Bull.

The Australian was the most experienced and it wasn’t until 2018 that Verstappen finished with more podiums at Red Bull.

Ricciardo moved to Renault ahead of the 2019 season, with Red Bull boss Christian Horner describing him at the time as “running away from a fight”.

The Australian spent two relatively frustrating years with the French manufacturer before finally joining McLaren for 2021.

Max Verstappen (pictured left) has rejected any suggestion.  Daniel Ricciardo (pictured right) was the only rider who could match him in a Red Bull car.  (Getty Images)

Max Verstappen (pictured left) has rejected any suggestion. Daniel Ricciardo (pictured right) was the only rider who could match him in a Red Bull car. (Getty Images)

However, in a recent interview with GP Racing, Verstappen denied the claim that Ricciardo was the only driver who could match him in the same race car and that he has struggled now.

Verstappen said his skills, which came from experience in an F1 car, saw him rise above the pack.

“I think I got better as well eventually, because I got more and more experience… So I also find it hard to really compare fairly, you know,” said Verstappen.

“I find it a bit unfair to say that maybe he was closer, and I think there is a lot of stuff in there. Sure, Daniel was back then, you know… He’s still a little older and more experienced.

“But I think I’ve gained a lot of experience over the last few years … And I really think that’s where the big leap started to happen, which I think is a natural process. during the first five years of your F1 career. “

More from Yahoo Sports


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Choice of GBH passport for November https://marlborough-monaco.com/choice-of-gbh-passport-for-november/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:27:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/choice-of-gbh-passport-for-november/ Looking for some great programs to check out this month? GBH Passport is where you should be looking, and below are a few selections from Ron Bachman, Senior Director of Programming, and Devin Karambelas, Director of Programming. The member benefit that gives you extensive access to an on-demand library of quality public television programming, GBH […]]]>

Looking for some great programs to check out this month? GBH Passport is where you should be looking, and below are a few selections from Ron Bachman, Senior Director of Programming, and Devin Karambelas, Director of Programming. The member benefit that gives you extensive access to an on-demand library of quality public television programming, GBH Passport features current and past seasons of PBS and GBH shows – including drama, science, history. and the arts. Watch anytime on GBH.org or on the PBS application.

Power of flour

Stream now on GBH Passport

This entertaining new series from BBC Scotland pits fellow pastry chefs against each other in the ultimate office competition – the battle to be crowned the best baker in the business. From designers to distillers, teachers to charity workers, amateur bakers from all walks of life come together to bake their best cookies, scones, cakes and brownies. But this is a full-scale workplace war, and they’ll need all of their skills to prove they can handle the heat. Once the dough has risen and the dust has settled, who will win the Flour Power trophy? Scratch your Great British Pastry Fair itching here. —Ron

Wallander

Stream now on GBH Passport

Do you remember this one? Kenneth Branagh, whose semi-autobiographical film Belfast hits theaters in America this month as Kurt Wallander, a detective inspector from the small Swedish town of Ystad, in this adaptation of Henning Mankell’s novels. At the series premiere on Mystery of the masterpiece in 2009, one of Wallander’s colleagues was played by a then little-known actor by the name of Tom Hiddleston, whose role of Loki in various Marvel films came thanks to the star of the series: Branagh recruited the actor for 2011 Thor when he made this movie, and the rest, as they say, is cinematic history. This is a terrific (albeit dark) mystery series, so here’s your chance to see it if you missed it, or revisit it in all its dark glory. —Ron

You won’t kill, season 3

Streaming on Passport from November 18

The third season of the Italian crime drama arrives on Passport this month, starring former Miss Italy Miriam Leone as Detective Valeria Ferro. Set in industrial Turin, the series doesn’t trade off the usual Italian stereotypes of sunshine, gorgeous architecture, and mouth-watering food. Instead, it dives into the gritty and sordid belly of the country. Concrete example: when the body of a young woman is found near an apiary with her hands cut off, Ferro learns that the victim’s twin sister committed suicide a few months earlier, or did she commit suicide? (If the answer is ‘yes’ there wouldn’t be much mystery here, so draw your own conclusions.) —Ron

Yung Punx: a punk parable


Stream now on GBH Passport

The musicians of the punk band Color Killer may be between 8 and 12 years old, but don’t let that fool you, these kids are eleven. This charming documentary follows the band’s comrades, originally from Marlborough, MA, and their supporting manager / roadie / driver parents as they navigate the notoriously punk world of basement practices, dive bars, festival concerts and recording sessions, culminating in an invitation to play The Warped Tour. But can Dylan, Lincoln, Matt and Nate survive internal tensions and jealousies to put on the biggest show of their young lives? The road to musical stardom is rocky, indeed. Reported by Chris Parnell. –Diviner

Earth Girls


Binge all three seasons from November 27

Shot in and around the perfect Warwickshire, this heartwarming series follows an all-female workforce recruited to work as farm laborers, replacing the men who enlisted to serve in World War II. While there is no shortage of British wartime drama, the life and loves of the Women’s Land Army provide a welcome female perspective on the war effort. Against the backdrop of the Hoxley Estate, Nancy, Joyce, Esther, Bea and Annie do their best to keep the Home Front functioning amid romance, feuds, rural chores, and a German on the loose (!) . This Passport exclusive should resonate with fans of Call the midwife, Bletchley’s circle and Domestic fires. —Devin

Independent objective: tax free


Streaming on Passport from November 22

For decades, Rebecca Danigelis worked tirelessly as a cleaner in a Boston hotel to give her two sons every chance of success. But when she was unexpectedly fired at the age of 75, she found herself with few savings and little job prospects. Rebecca’s son and filmmaker Sian-Pierre Regis, a former MTV and CNN contributor, documents Rebecca’s story in poignant detail, deciding to repay her sacrifices by taking her on an unforgettable journey. Duty free deftly examines sobering realities for millions of aging Americans facing economic insecurity, but the love between Rebecca and Sian-Pierre is a joy to watch. —Devin

See more selections for November and beyond in the GBH Passport collection.


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Barbara Ruth Howard | Obituary https://marlborough-monaco.com/barbara-ruth-howard-obituary/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/barbara-ruth-howard-obituary/ Barbara Ruth Howard, 76, of Marlborough, passed away peacefully at her daughter’s home on October 25, 2021, with her family by her side. She was born on February 27, 1945 in Staten Island, NY, to the late Muriel Elizabeth (Apgar) Burbank and Richard Mayberry Burbank. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her […]]]>

Barbara Ruth Howard, 76, of Marlborough, passed away peacefully at her daughter’s home on October 25, 2021, with her family by her side.

She was born on February 27, 1945 in Staten Island, NY, to the late Muriel Elizabeth (Apgar) Burbank and Richard Mayberry Burbank.

In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her stepmother, Hazel E. Casillo, of Keene; her son, Kevin S. Burbank, of Langdon; and her beloved husband of 43 years, James E. Howard, of Marlborough.

Barbara was a beloved wife, mother and grandmother who loved her family and friends. She has been a loyal and dedicated member of Marlborough Federated Church since arriving in Marlborough in 1971. She has served her community by volunteering for countless activities over the years through her church, Marlborough Elementary School, The Ladies Circle and Evening United Groups. If something was going on in town, she was there. She was known to her friends and family as someone who always laughed and had fun being around.

Her relationship with Christ and her family were anchors in her life. His generosity is unparalleled. He was someone who would give you their last dime if you were in need. Barbara was always up for something fun. She has facilitated many activities for children in our area, as a Girl Scout leader, assisting in 4-H activities and leading educational tours in the Nation’s Capital via the American Heritage Tour for 15 years. Many years ago she spread joy by playing the clown at religious events. She loved to cook delicious food for her friends and family. His loved ones will particularly miss his masterpiece Jell-O vert and his famous pumpkin pies.

Barbara was a devoted friend and had very strong friendships throughout her life. She always made time for her friends through activities like her “lunch group” and regular “card party” meetings. She never met a stranger and had a strange ability to connect with people from all walks of life. She was the kind of neighbor you would want to have. Before retiring, Barbara held several positions in the city and was a very hard worker, instilling a strong work ethic in her children. Most notably, she loved her working family at Yankee Magazine in Jaffrey and made lifelong friendships throughout her time at this company. She also worked at Chesco in Keene where she provided care to adults with developmental disabilities in the community and in their homes. After her retirement, she enjoyed taking care of her grandchildren Mason, Noah and Kenzie at home.

Barbara is survived by her son, Edward J. Howard (Melissa), of Marlborough; his daughter, Ellen M. Howard (Michael Clair), of Asheville, North Carolina; and her grandchildren: Mason J. Howard, Noah S. Howard and Mackenzie R. Howard of Marlborough, and Norah L. Clair and Conan J. Clair of Asheville, NC She is also survived by her beloved sister, Carole B. Vetland, formerly of Staten Island, NY, now of Pompano Beach, Florida; and his brother, Richard M. Burbank, of Staten Island, NY; her sisters-in-law: Shirley Leckie Reed of St. Paul, Minn., Casandra M. Silk of Kingston, RI, and Cindy J. Letendre (John) of Keene; several nieces, nephews, great-nieces, grand-nephews, special friends and beloved neighbors.

The family would like to especially thank the staff at Four Seasons Hospice and Hospice and Community Services (HCS) in Keene for their excellent care and compassion.

The family will hold a private funeral service on November 27, 2021 in Marlborough, followed by a Celebration of Life on June 18, 2022. Details will be communicated on the time and location of their celebration of life in the spring.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Marlborough Federated Church, 16 Pleasant St., Marlborough NH 03455. To plant a tree in memory of Barbara, please visit our flower shop.


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Art collectors Claribel and Etta Cone left Baltimore with one of their greatest gifts https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-collectors-claribel-and-etta-cone-left-baltimore-with-one-of-their-greatest-gifts/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 16:15:36 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-collectors-claribel-and-etta-cone-left-baltimore-with-one-of-their-greatest-gifts/ Although her formal education ended in high school, Etta was a dedicated student of art and history. Even before his visits to Europe and serious forays into the collection, Etta’s eye was way ahead of the world around him. The first paintings she ever purchased, five small oils by American impressionist Theodore Robinson, were chosen […]]]>

Although her formal education ended in high school, Etta was a dedicated student of art and history. Even before his visits to Europe and serious forays into the collection, Etta’s eye was way ahead of the world around him. The first paintings she ever purchased, five small oils by American impressionist Theodore Robinson, were chosen before Etta went to Paris, and even before those with deep roots in modern art circles. do not pursue similar work. In fact, the oils have been kept in the basement of the BMA for decades, and it wasn’t until the 1970s that Robinson’s work was better appreciated.

Nancy Ramage, the sisters’ great-great-niece and art historian based in Ithaca, New York, grew up listening to the stories of Etta and Claribel from her mother, Ellen Hirschland. Hirschland, née Berney, was devoted to her great aunt Etta and traveled with her in her youth. Hirschland, who died in 1999, and Ramage contributed several books and articles to the study of the sisters and their collection.

“[Etta] was kind of the intellect behind this collection, and it was she who started collecting, ”says Ramage. “Initially, Claribel was not at all interested in painting or art. She was studying medicine and doing pathological work. But Etta was making choices, especially those Robinsons she got, the first paintings she bought, that were just remarkable. She was so ahead of her time.

Etta absorbed all she could about art history, first on her own, then under the tutelage of the Steins, who were living abroad in 1901 when Etta first traveled to Europe. She visited Florence with Leo and spent long days with Gertrude in Paris, visiting galleries, museums and shops. Etta returned to Baltimore with new works of art and a growing passion for collecting. When her mother died at the end of the following year, Etta, then 32, found herself free from family obligations, well connected, and with a personal income. She embarked for Europe with Claribel the following summer.

A MATTER OF TASTE

Throughout the first decade of the 1900s, the sisters traveled to Europe, studying art, spending time with the Steins and their circle of friends, and, for Claribel, conducting medical research in Germany. Etta found the time to type the manuscript of Stein’s first novel,
Three lives, and receive a marriage proposal from Mahonri Young, grandson of Brigham Young. (It did not work.)

During a visit to Paris in 1905, the sisters attended the Salon d’Automne, where they had their first real look at avant-garde art. Bars of color and inaccurate shapes filled a room, including Matisse’s “Woman in a Hat”, a colorful portrait with bright teal and unfinished quality, which Leo Stein called “the meanest blot of paint.” He had ever seen. (After some thought, he and Gertrude purchased the painting, which is now on display at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.) Leo then took Gertrude and Etta with him to visit a young stranger from Spain who had exhibited works at the Salon, and soon the Steins and Cone Sisters were regular visitors to Pablo Picasso’s Paris studio. They often bought her drawings, in part out of charity to the starving artist – this was a habit of Etta in particular; she also supported MICA students in difficulty in their country, but also because they admired her work. (They never bought anything without what Ramage and his mother described as “great care and a safety of taste.”)

“Etta tasted phenomenal,” says Ramage. “The fact, for example, that she bought so many drawings over the years. . . they are not splashy, but they are incredibly valuable and descriptive of the artist’s thought. I’m not just talking about the Picassos she bought on that first visit when she might have been doing charity work, but throughout her life she bought drawings, prints and prints which are sensitive and very important works.

It wasn’t long after this monumental salon that Etta met Henri Matisse, the artist who would become a constant friend and influence for the rest of his life. After the Salon d’Automne, Matisse often finds himself in the Stein apartments in Paris, one of the few places where his work is exhibited. In January 1906, Etta began to acquire works by the 36-year-old painter. It should be noted that it took many years for Matisse to gain the respect of the art world as a whole. Even seven years later, when Matisse’s works were loaned to the 1913 Armory Show, one reviewer called the artist’s contributions “the most hideous monstrosities ever perpetrated in the name of long-suffering art. “.

But despite everything, Etta remained a staunch supporter, and when Claribel discovered her own interest in collecting, she also began to acquire non-traditional pieces with marked enthusiasm. The older sister Cone was often credited for the quality of the collection, but the sisters’ contributions were simply different.

“Certainly [Claribel’s] The purchase of Matisse’s ‘Blue Nude’ completely changed the content of the collection, ”says Katy Rothkopf, Senior Curator of European Painting and Sculpture at the BMA and Anne and Ben Cone Memorial Director of the new Center for Matisse Studies . “It has had an impact on the whole art world. With her purchases, she made these big statements. Etta made bolder, brighter purchases later in life, but she had a strong eye for small works, especially when it came to Matisse. “She really got into all the media and was fascinated by it all.” Rothkopf said. “It really is his legacy.”


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Nye & Company’s Chic and Antique Estate Treasures auction October 27-28 features fine decorative art https://marlborough-monaco.com/nye-companys-chic-and-antique-estate-treasures-auction-october-27-28-features-fine-decorative-art/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/nye-companys-chic-and-antique-estate-treasures-auction-october-27-28-features-fine-decorative-art/ Painting by James Seymour (British, 1702-1752), titled Hare Coursing, signed lower right, dated 1737.Nye & Company Auctioneers BLOOMFIELD, NJ – The two-day online auction of treasures from the chic and antique estate of Nye & Company Auctioneers, scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, October 27-28, will be hosted by properties of Winston FC and CZ Guest, […]]]>

Painting by James Seymour (British, 1702-1752), titled Hare Coursing, signed lower right, dated 1737.
Nye & Company Auctioneers

BLOOMFIELD, NJ – The two-day online auction of treasures from the chic and antique estate of Nye & Company Auctioneers, scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, October 27-28, will be hosted by properties of Winston FC and CZ Guest, the estate by Mrs. Mimi Adler, the NAMITS Collection, the Steve and Stephanie Alpert Collection, Millbrook School Items and goods from the Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Terian Collection, as of 10:00 a.m. East.

The sale will present a large and diverse selection of fine and decorative art. Real-time internet auctions and mail order auctions will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com, Bidsquare.com and the Nye & Company website: www.nyeandcompany.com. Telephone auctions will also be available on a limited basis.

“This auction will be a special one and is sure to delight collectors, dealers and institutions,” said Andrew Holter of Nye & Company Auctioneers. “It is made up of an exceptional selection of properties from private collections, with an emphasis on American and European furniture, sports art, Chinese ceramics, rugs and contemporary and modern art. In addition, a beautiful set of modern furniture complements the contemporary art.

One of the headliners of the auction is the collection of Winston FC and CZ Guest. Winston Frederick Churchill Guest was born in England in 1906 and was named after his godfather and his father’s best friend and cousin, Sir Winston Churchill. He was brought up in the company of great men. His father, the Right Honorable Captain Frederick E. Guest, grandson of the 7th Duke of Marlborough, was a Member of Parliament and held the post of Britain’s First Secretary of State for Air. His mother, Amy Phipps, daughter of Henry Phipps of Pittsburgh, was a philanthropist and partner of Carnegie Steel Corporation. It has mobilized its considerable resources to satisfy its deep interest in aviation and to realize its value in the future of global transportation.

Mr. Guest was not only a dedicated student (while attending Yale University and Columbia Law School he developed fluency in French and Spanish), but also an avid sports enthusiast and gamer. by Polo Hall of Fame 10 Goal. He then served as a captain in the United States Marine Corps during World War II, and during his trips abroad he began his outstanding art collection. Many Chinese works in the collection were purchased by Mr. Guest in the mid-20th century after the war, through his close friend Ralph M. Chait of Chait Galleries, and through CT Loo, also an important Chinese art dealer of the period.

In 1947, Mr. Guest married the love of his life, Lucy Douglas Cochrane, of Boston, known to family and friends as CZ, following his younger brother’s attempt to call him “sister. “. Ernest Hemingway was witnessed as a witness at the ceremony in Havana, Cuba. As a style icon of New York high society, Ms. Guest graced the covers of Time review and City Country, among many others. With their unbridled enthusiasm, high standards and unmatched sense of style, CZ and Winston FC Guest have become one of America’s most iconic taste-designer couples of the 20th century.

Painting by Severin Roesen (American, 1815-1872), entitled Nature morte de fruits, signed lower right.
Nye & Company Auctioneers

Reminiscent of having traveled a lot, the collection offers a diverse selection of furniture and decorative arts from England, France and Italy. The couple collected a variety of 17th and 18th century European wall mounts that featured some of their Chinese porcelain. These supports are exceptionally sculpted, with flowing lines of intertwined foliage, monograms, seashells and figures. The adage that good things come in small packages definitely applies to these pieces.

There is also a beautifully carved oak marble-topped console, decorated with satyr faces and continuing with forked feet. This impressive room would have made all the difference in his European country house. Note also the sporting art of the collection. John Frederick Herring Sr., Henry Alken, Sr., Charles Towne, Harry Hall, and Sawrey Gilpin are all pictured, with classic English depictions of horses in the 19th century. These vibrant equestrian portraits capture an era of landowning nobility and the celebration of horse racing and fox hunting.

The Guest collection is completed by the property of the estate of Mimi Adler. Ms. Adler and her late husband, Max, also collected sports art, silver, English and American furniture, and Chinese export emblazoned porcelain. Of particular note is an exceptional oil painting by the famous 18th century British sports artist James Seymour (1702-1752). Hare course is a great photo that would be a welcome addition to any serious collector. This collection also includes a stunning portrait of a man on horseback by John N. Sartorius. The exceptional work captures the essence of an 18th century English gentleman riding the countryside on a large bay horse. This image has all the characteristics of highlighting the high social status of the rider.

Watercolor on paper by Paul Emile Pissarro (1884-1972), titled Le Pain de Sucre, signed by the artist.
Nye & Company Auctioneers

The Adlers also collected a wide variety of English and American furniture. They acquired items from top merchants in the field such as Israel Sack, Inc., Hirschl & Adler, James Robinson, Arthur Ackerman & Son, Inc., Mallet and Richard Green. The collection includes a superb bookcase with a mahogany front inlaid with Regency ebony. With its delicately interwoven mullions, vibrant veneers, and well-balanced proportions, the cabinet is truly a centerpiece and would be the highlight of any room and collection.

There is also a magnificent 18th century George III carved gilded wood mirror. This piece is a masterpiece of Rococo aesthetics. The fluid sculpture of the foliage and volutes is exceptional. Acquired from the New York firm Israel Sack, Inc., it is a superb Liverpool Success in America pitcher of cider. Featuring the American flag and the eagle, this coin arouses a patriotic fervor unlike any other. Israel Sack also sold the Adlers a large federal office signed by Providence, Rhode Island cabinetmaker William Clark. It is a true historical document of American cabinetmaking. Another highly respected New York gallery, Hirschl and Adler, sold the couple a quintessential Severin Roesen. Still life of fruits. The image is brilliantly colored and symbolic of a generous and prosperous America.

Continuing the theme of fine art, the NAMITS collection features a diverse selection of contemporary art from around the world. Belgian artist, Charlotte Culot, manages to capture a bold, yet light and airy feeling of her work titled In the heart of white. This abstract representation of clear white and yellow colors attracts the viewer and creates a calming effect that soothes the soul. The famous French artist François Bard does not disappoint with his bust of a man. Filled with frenzied energy and textured paint strokes, this work is mysterious and a visual delight.

Continuing with European artists from different private collections, a small group of ceramics by Pablo Picasso. These colorful and beautifully sculpted pieces provide a great opportunity to own something designed by one of the world’s most famous artists.

Picasso’s ceramics are complemented by a property in the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Terian, including a pair of green upholstered Percival Lafer lounge chairs that feature modern, rectilinear lines. The collection also includes an Edward Wormely one-drawer console for Dunbar. Light and airy, this piece seems to be inspired by Chinese altar tables.

A Philip and Kelvin Laverne table from another collector also pairs well with the aforementioned pieces.

Millbrook School (Millbrook, NY) has approved a selection of properties to be banned. The pieces include a magnificent watercolor by the French impressionist painter Paul Emile Pissarro. Continuing in the footsteps of his father, Camille Pissarro, and his godfather, Claude Monet, Paul’s work is reminiscent of these master technicians. There is also a nice selection of Chinese Blue Fitzhugh export ceramics. It’s a perfect opportunity for graduates to buy a piece of their childhood and support the school that propelled them into adulthood.

People can bid in absentia and online. An online preview will take place October 13-27-28 at www.nyeandcompany.com, www.liveauctioneers.com, www.bidsquare.com and www.invaluable.com. Anyone looking for additional images, condition reports, or item information is welcome to visit the Nye & Company website or email info@nyeandcompany.com.

John Nye had a long and successful career at Sotheby’s before he and his wife, Kathleen, bought Dawson’s in 2003 and founded Dawson & Nye. With the move to Bloomfield seven years later, they renamed the business to Nye & Company (Auctioneers, Appraisers, Antiques). The company has a nationwide presence, but much of the business comes from trusts and estates in the tri-state area.

For more information on Nye & Company Auctioneers and the Estate Treasures online auction only Wednesday and Thursday October 27-28, visit www.nyeandcompany.com. The full color catalog can be viewed in its entirety now at www.nyeandcompany.com, www.liveauctioneers.com, www.bidsquare.com and www.invaluable.com.

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300 bags of heroin + more drugs found during traffic stop in western MA https://marlborough-monaco.com/300-bags-of-heroin-more-drugs-found-during-traffic-stop-in-western-ma/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/300-bags-of-heroin-more-drugs-found-during-traffic-stop-in-western-ma/ I think it was Albert Einstein who said, “The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. After a recent traffic stop on Saturday, Springfield police seized more than 300 bags of heroin in addition to 19 grams of cocaine. WWLP / News 22 Springfield reports that at approximately 5:45 a.m. on […]]]>

I think it was Albert Einstein who said, “The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. After a recent traffic stop on Saturday, Springfield police seized more than 300 bags of heroin in addition to 19 grams of cocaine.

WWLP / News 22 Springfield reports that at approximately 5:45 a.m. on Saturday morning, Springfield Police responded to Baystate Hospital with a report of a gunshot victim. Police found the car that dropped off the anonymous victim at the intersection of Main Street and State Street in Springfield.

The passenger, Yasser Adil, 23, of Miami, Fla., And the driver, who remains unidentified, were arrested. Police then searched the vehicle. During the search, they recovered approximately 300 bags of heroin and approximately 19 ounces of cocaine.

Police then arrested Yasser Adil who was later charged with the following charges:

  • Cocaine trafficking, 18-36 grams
  • Possession with intent to distribute a Class A drug
  • Possession with intent to distribute a Class B drug

Hospital staff, after examining the wound, did not find the wound to correspond to a gunshot. The area where the injury occurred was not discovered by the police because the victim did not cooperate.

Discover the initial story by visiting the WWLP website here.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what the locations are for today. (If they remained standing.)

WATCH: See the iconic cars that debuted the year you were born

The 100 Best Places to Live on the East Coast

KEEP READING: What Were The Most Popular Baby Names Of The Past 100 Years?


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Two books on the English country house https://marlborough-monaco.com/two-books-on-the-english-country-house/ Fri, 01 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/two-books-on-the-english-country-house/ In 1974, the Victoria and Albert Museum organized an exhibition titled “The Destruction of the Country House”. Director Roy Strong noticed that visitors were in tears as they accepted all that was missing – well over a thousand grand houses had been demolished since the 1870s. In the exhibit catalog, National Trust expert James Lees-Milne […]]]>

In 1974, the Victoria and Albert Museum organized an exhibition titled “The Destruction of the Country House”. Director Roy Strong noticed that visitors were in tears as they accepted all that was missing – well over a thousand grand houses had been demolished since the 1870s. In the exhibit catalog, National Trust expert James Lees-Milne opened his essay by calling the country house “as archaic as the osprey,” a bird of prey extinct in England since 1840.

The story of the country house: a story of places and people

By Clive Aslet

Yale

256 pages

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Two very different but equally compelling new books by great British architectural historians give a note of optimism. “The Story of the Country House: A History of Places and People” by Clive Aslet is an eclectic scientific tale, retracing the development of the country house from medieval hunting lodges to modern villas in ‘today. The scholarly and delightfully talkative “Noble Ambitions: The Fall and Rise of the English Country House After World War II” by Adrian Tinniswood examines the changes in the status of the great houses in post-war Britain, the old money versus new money and social upheaval.

Mr. Aslet is an elegant writer with a wry sense of humor. It features personalities as colorful as AW Pugin, the Catholic fanatic who pioneered the British Gothic revival in the 19th century; the restless and neurotic King John, whose baggage train drowned in a river with the crown jewels; and James I, who, at his coronation, freed prisoners, “with the exception of those held for very serious crimes such as popery”. he would find “the same configuration of furniture wherever it is” (sort of Holiday Inn mentality, I guess).

Mr. Aslet writes: “Even country houses that strongly evoke a single period are often palimpsests where one epoch replaces another, a process which can recur over and over again until the deep past is no more. ‘a ghostly and indecipherable stain. To assert his point of view, he presents Stansted Park, a magnificent stately home that began life as a medieval hunting lodge and has seen many permutations, including a 19th century college where, of all things, “de young Jews without resources could stay, be razed and baptized, and be trained as missionaries to be sent to their own people, and a riding school prepared them to travel to distant lands.

The latest version of Stansted Park is a grand Edwardian mansion, the embodiment of the golden age of the country house which “in the novels of Henry James”, Mr. Aslet tells us, “evokes an ideal state of human existence which, after centuries of evolution, has reached a level as near perfection as it is possible for mortals to attain.

In lyrical prose, Mr. Aslet discusses the influence of Inigo Jones, who “crossed Stuart’s sky like a meteor” with his designs based on the Italian classicism of Andrea Palladio. He explores the Baroque style that began in the 1680s, with its dazzling illusionism. “The gods and goddesses seemed to spring from the walls and ceilings. . . . Everything was movement, spectacle, drama. . . . Statues frolic on the horizons. The gardens, landscaped with gravel paths and trimmed hedges, seemed to stretch for miles.

One of these Baroque masterpieces is Chatsworth House, home of the Dukes of Devonshire. A 126-room princely mansion dating back to 1686, Chatsworth housed a girls’ school during World War II to avoid requisition by the military. The vandalism of soldiers was legendary. “Stories abound of jeeps coming down tall stairs, of garden ornaments used for target training by drunken troops,” writes Mr. Tinniswood, “and of family portraits turned into makeshift dartboards. “

In 1950, when the 10th Duke died suddenly at age 55, his successor faced catastrophic taxes of around 80%. For the 11th Duke, selling Chatsworth would have been a personal failure: “I don’t want to be the one to give up. With the help of his wife, Deborah, the youngest of the Mitford sisters, in 1959 the Duke moved his family into a modernized 20-bedroom suite and opened the state rooms to the public.

Noble Ambitions: The Fall and Rise of the British Country House after WWII

By Adrian Tinniswood

Basic

429 pages

We may earn a commission when you purchase products through the links on our site.

Mr Tinniswood recalls that Blenheim Palace, home of the Dukes of Marlborough and designed by John Vanbrugh in glorious grounds by Capability Brown, was taken over during part of the war by the MI5 bus line from Oxford to Woodstock , who used to call when they reached the gates of Blenheim, “Someone for MI5?” “”

After the war, the aristocrats whom the author calls “showman-peers” found inventive ways to raise money. In Beaulieu, a 7,000-acre estate, Lord Montagu established an automobile museum, and in 1956 began a series of jazz concerts that eventually drew over 20,000 people. In 1960 there was a riot as fans of modern and traditional jazz clashed. Undeterred, Montagu put on another concert the following summer. When the crowd went wild in the village, he put an end to the party.

In 1966, Lord Bath opened a safari park at Longleat, his 130-room Elizabethan mansion on 9,000 acres. Forty-six lions observed the “meaty cows in the park beyond”. Bath has also put on rock concerts and was once forced to barricade himself indoors with the performers as screaming girls pounded on windows. When 20,000 people showed up to see the Rolling Stones, there were 200 casualties. Bath was not impressed. “” So few cases of hospitalization out of 20,000, it is not a bad record, “he declared to the press, with aristocratic recklessness. “

Musicians didn’t just perform in big houses, they bought them. Mr Tinniswood writes that “in the 1960s rock stars and stately homes went together like cannabis and cookies or Rolls-Royces and swimming pools.” Celebrities and rich Americans bought them too. J. Paul Getty owned a Tudor mansion. He was so stingy that he had locks installed on his phones and installed a prepaid one for his guests.

Mr Aslet suggests that during the Covid lockdowns, those lucky enough to have even the most ordinary country house “returned to a state of social relations closer to Jane Austen’s age than to the 21st century: family members had to rely on each other. for company, since they weren’t allowed out. But it was not as difficult an ordeal as elsewhere, given the space in the house, the terrain to walk around, the vegetables in the garden, the pantries and freezers full of emergency supplies and possibly. be a well-stocked cellar.

Meanwhile, the osprey has made a comeback. Perhaps this bodes well for the future of the beloved English country house, so vividly portrayed by these two writers.

Copyright © 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8


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Blenheim Palace: the story of the only country house to be awarded the title of “palace” https://marlborough-monaco.com/blenheim-palace-the-story-of-the-only-country-house-to-be-awarded-the-title-of-palace/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/blenheim-palace-the-story-of-the-only-country-house-to-be-awarded-the-title-of-palace/ With its exuberant 250-meter-long facade, Blenheim Palace is the crowning achievement of Vanbrugh’s work. Jack Watkins takes a look at this true masterpiece. Sprawling impersonal country houses, built to impress visitors rather than provide creature comforts to locals, were a feature of the English landscape long before Blenheim Palace. Yet this huge complex, the house […]]]>

With its exuberant 250-meter-long facade, Blenheim Palace is the crowning achievement of Vanbrugh’s work. Jack Watkins takes a look at this true masterpiece.

Sprawling impersonal country houses, built to impress visitors rather than provide creature comforts to locals, were a feature of the English landscape long before Blenheim Palace. Yet this huge complex, the house alone encompassing seven acres of Oxfordshire when it was completed in 1725, was comparable to the largest palaces in Europe.

Set to become the historic seat of the Dukes of Marlborough after Queen Anne gifted the Woodstock Mansion to the 1st Duke, John Churchill, in 1705 as a reward for his military triumphs, it is the only English country house – in apart from those of bishops – which, by long-standing popular consent, received the honorary title of palace (it was once described by some as Blenheim Castle).

The Great Court and front elevation of Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire. Credit: Alamy

It is the only one on the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, which places it in company with Stonehenge, the Tower of London and the Cathedrals of Canterbury and Durham for what is considered to be its invaluable expression. facets of our national culture. .

Sir John Vanbrugh (1664-1726), its first creator, already knew how to think big. Like Sir Christopher Wren, Vanbrugh was a late entrant into the architectural profession, being 35 when he received his first commission, Castle Howard in North Yorkshire, for the Earl of Carlisle in 1699. Suddenly, this splendid creation establishes him as the main representative of the British Baroque, of grandiose style, of romantic spirit.

Blenheim Palace

Credit: Blenheim Palace

Vanbrugh had relied heavily on the technical expertise of Nicholas Hawksmoor at Castle Howard and was to do so again in Blenheim, on the grounds of the former Royal Hunting Park at Woodstock. They formed a fitting alliance, both believing that the overall impression of a building was more important than the purity of its style.

It was Vanbrugh’s stated intention to give his homes “something of the castle air” and Blenheim’s colossal scale has it. With its facade extending 856 feet in its entirety, its intimidating Corinthian portico and corner towers project a curious blend of Imperial Rome and medieval Baronialism.

Further reflecting his keen sense of the past, during the construction of the palace, the architect wrote a letter to Sarah Churchill, the First Duchess, unsuccessfully pleading for the conservation of the remains of the old Woodstock mansion (which dated from the 12th C. century) in the park, for its historical associations and to attract attention.

John vanbrug

John Vanbrug. Portrait of the English playwright and architect Sir John Vanbrugh (1664-1726), who is most famous for the design of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard. Painting by Sir Godfrey Kneller, oil on canvas, c.1710. Credit: Alamy

Many other big names from the Baroque era were employed inside. The Great Hall’s flamboyant ceiling was painted by Sir James Thornhill, the greatest English painter and decorator of his day.

Louis Laguerre, his French-born and England-based rival, embellished the Great Drawing Room and there are many military-style sculptures by Grinling Gibbons, who also designed the mighty pinnacles of the towers, as well as busts by Michael Rysbrack. .

Yet as the heyday of country houses neared its peak, Blenheim was more of a “royal and national monument,” in Vanbrugh’s words, than a house. As such, its location on the edge of a plateau was important. Although the original formal gardens were created by the royal gardener, Henry Wise, Vanbrugh, again assisted by Hawksmoor, designed the somewhat oversized bridge that crosses the river, as well as the flower garden.

The Grand Bridge of Blenheim Palace

The Grand Bridge of Blenheim Palace. © Blenheim Palace

The vast lake was created by damming the river, as part of Capability Brown’s later landscape work, which reflected a desire within the English garden movement of the time for a more Arcadian look. Indeed, some call Blenheim a more naturalistic version of Versailles.

Sadly, in part due to the fact that Blenheim Palace is the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill (he proposed to Clementine here, and the couple are buried near Bladon, visible from Blenheim), he has become one of these places to check for tourists to shoot on busy routes.

Considering the array of memories, the lightly glazed appearances are understandable: there is so much to take.

See more and get information about visitors to www.blenheimpalace.com

Leap of Faith: Vanbrugh’s other masterpieces

Seaton Delaval room

Seaton Delaval Hall, Northumberland. Few architects could boast of having a CV like that of Vanbrugh, who was of Flemish descent but born in London. He had spent time in the army, had been imprisoned in the Bastille on suspicion of espionage, and was a prolific and successful writer of obscene Restoration comedies before his abrupt switch to architecture.

Although his Castle Howard was a triumph, it was still an unknown amount at the time Blenheim was built and, although it was the choice of Queen Anne and John Churchill for the task, Sarah Churchill had wanted the proven veteran. Wren.

The relationship between the pragmatist Sarah and the extravagant architect deteriorated to such an extent that Vanbrugh eventually left the project, which was completed by Hawksmoor. Nonetheless, Vanbrugh continued to work on country houses without Hawksmoor’s assistance, including Kimbolton Castle (Huntingdonshire), Kings Weston (Bristol), Grimsthorpe Castle (Lincolnshire) and Seaton Delaval (Northumberland, above), the latter being perhaps his most romantic baroque creation of all.


From 1661 until his death in 1715, Louis XIV invested huge sums of money transforming the Palace of Versailles into


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