Marlborough masterpiece – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 09:55:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough masterpiece – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 German settlers and world famous wines https://marlborough-monaco.com/german-settlers-and-world-famous-wines/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:46:03 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/german-settlers-and-world-famous-wines/ The Barossa Valley in South Australia is a world famous wine region and a paradise for pleasure seekers. Prussian immigrants also laid its foundation 150 years ago. Johannes Menge must have articulate abilities. Or, more likely, he was just a good scientist. In any case, the German mineralogist was right when, in 1839, he was […]]]>


The Barossa Valley in South Australia is a world famous wine region and a paradise for pleasure seekers. Prussian immigrants also laid its foundation 150 years ago.

Johannes Menge must have articulate abilities. Or, more likely, he was just a good scientist. In any case, the German mineralogist was right when, in 1839, he was one of the first Europeans to advance into the Barossa Valley, northeast of Adelaide, and predicted a belated future for the valley.

“Barossa is South Australia’s icing on the cake,” wrote the enthusiastic explorer. His specimens, commissioned by the British colony of South Australia, indicate the right mix of poor, sometimes fertile, sometimes mineral-rich soils. The climate was Mediterranean with hot summers and mild winters. There was clean water and lots of animals to hunt.

“I see vineyards and orchards there like nowhere else in the colony,” Menge said optimistically. A few decades later, his vision had become a reality – thanks to hardworking settlers from England and Germany.

world famous wines

Between 1840 and 1850, the first immigrants from the Old World laid the foundations of one of the most famous wine regions of the New World. Wine connoisseurs refer to the wines of the Barossa Valley and the Adelaide Hills in the same breath as the great wines of California’s Napa Valley, the Sauvignon Blancs of Marlborough, New Zealand, or the finest wines vineyards near the South African metropolis of Cape Town.

The Barossa Valley and the Rolling Hills east of Adelaide are famous for their bold red wines. Above all, Shiraz has a worldwide reputation. Penfolds “Grange” is one of the finest wines in the world, costing a few hundred euros a bottle.

While a plague of phylloxera destroyed large parts of Europe’s wine regions in the late 19th century, South Australia was spared. Today there are vines that are over 130 years old.

Winzerfarm joins Winzerfarm

There are now over 150 wineries in the Barossa Valley alone. Countless wine farms surround the towns of Nuriotpa, Tanunda, Angston and Lindoch. Nearly endless rows of vines stretch across the vast plains and gentle hills. Early in the morning, hot air balloons often fly over the vines bathed in warm light.

After a while, cyclists and pedestrians set off to discover the vineyards or “Kaiserstuhl” near Tanunda, which culminates at 588 meters above sea level. The name of the highest mountain in the region testifies to the great influence of German immigrants. German viticulture pioneers were also influential. Famous wineries such as Henske Cellars, Wolf Blass or Jacob’s Creek were all built by Germans.

One of the most beautiful and unusual is Seppeltsfield, founded in 1850 by Joseph and Johanna Seppelt. The large estate in the village of the same name has become a tourist attraction.

The artists of the “Jam Factory” work in open studios and craftsmen like Barry Gardner in their knife factory. “I love sharing my passion with the public,” says the bald, gray-bearded man. His handcrafted knives are a true masterpiece. You can make your own Damascus steel knives at one of Gardner’s workshops. “A personal knife is like an extension of your own hand,” says Gardner.

Anyone who has gone hungry from pounding red-hot steel with a hammer should brace themselves before going wine tasting in Seppeltsfield at the estate’s restaurant. Chef Daniel Murphy cooks at “Fino”. Their dishes are mainly based on local products, which are often harvested the same day only a few kilometers from their restaurant.

“Brossa is a great destination for foodies and a great place to work for chefs,” enthuses Murphy. In addition to its own restaurant, Rileys & Chateau Hentley Farms restaurant, the winery of the same name in Saint-Hugo and Murphy’s former workplace at the luxury hotel The Louise are among the best regional addresses for foodies. of appellation.

good port under a corrugated iron roof

At Fino’s, Murphy’s dishes are served under the shade of tall palm trees in front of the historic Barrel store. The estate’s wealth is stored in typically Australian simple fashion under a corrugated iron roof, on which the winery’s name is painted in white letters.

More than 100 oak barrels containing fine Port wines stand in long rows in the attic. “The earliest date is 1878,” Murphy explains during his visit to the Sepeltsfield Shrine.

Since then, the property has had at least one cask per vintage, Murphy said. As the only wine estate in the world, Seppeltsfield can therefore market a century-old Port wine every year.

Chief winemaker Fiona Donald describes the current “1922 vintage 100 Year Old Para Vintage Tawny” as “a port of great intensity with lemon aromas and hints of dried stone fruits – nutty, spicy, with a excellent length”. A full bottle costs 1500 Australian dollars, which is equivalent to a good 1000 euros. For AU$90, you can try the rare treasure for less on a guided tour.

“Our ‘taste for your birthday’ tours are particularly popular,” says Daniel Murphy. He then takes the port wines of the guests’ birth years directly from the respective barrels with a long wine pipette. The price for this tasting tour is 109 Australian dollars.

The “basement door” sign means: Please enter

Seppeltsfield is an icon in the Barossa Valley, but many other wineries also produce fine wines. Where a “Cellar Door” sign hangs, visitors are invited to taste and buy directly from the cellar. Just like Damien Tscherke’s cellar.

A tall man with razor-sharp hair closes systematically. Despite the rising heat in the Barossa Valley, their impressive new wine cellar requires no air conditioning. “We are the only ones here who have put all the production underground,” says Tscherke. He is proud of his elegant wines that reflect the terroir.

Tscharke attaches great importance to sustainability. He does not think in the short term, but in generations. As his family has always done. The Tscharkes were among the first German settlers. “Like many people here, my ancestors came from Prussia,” he says. The settlers were old Lutherans inherited from the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm III. have been removed.

How Immigrants Shaped the Region

Because they were no longer allowed to freely practice their religion, they sought a new home in the mid-19th century. Helping was English businessman and philanthropist George Fife Angus, who was instrumental in establishing the British colony of South Australia. Angus funded the migration of former Lutherans to South Australia – not only through donations, but also because he viewed devout, hard-working Germans as ideal immigrants.

His calculations paid off. Within a few years, immigrants from Silesia and other regions also developed farms and towns, to which they gave German names such as Krondorf, Hoffnungsthal, Schönborn or Gnadenfrey.

He named Tscherke’s best wine after Guadenfrey, now called Marananga. During and after the two world wars, German names were not so popular in Australia. So many places have been renamed.

Apart from these dark times, German settlers in Australia could rest easy and develop their own language and religion. In churches such as Tabor Lutheran Church in Tanunda, audiences are still held in an old dialect, ‘Barossa German’.

Many places of worship are real gems. This also applies to the Gnadenfrei Marananga Lutheran Church, which is located on Seppeltsfield Road amongst vineyards at the start of a long avenue of palm trees. A majestic mausoleum, in which members of the Seppelt family have been buried since 1927, stands on a nearby hill.

Evidence of German settler history is everywhere in South Australia – at the Barossa Museum in Tanunda as well as in the streets and markets. Again and again you come across shops and bars with German names. And at the Barossa Farmers Market in Angston, “Steney’s Traditional Mettwurst” is a hit.

Barossa Valley

  • Holiday destination: Das Barusa Valley is about 70 km northeast of Adelaide in the south Australian and is famous for vineyard,
  • get there : Provides connections to different airlines southern australia with stop South East Asia Or on Persian Gulf Feather. Often a cheaper option are ANA flights that have a layover Japan,
  • Walk in: tourist outing Germany Must have a valid passport and either a free Electronic Visitor Visa or Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA), which may incur a $20 AUD processing fee.

Both types allow you to stay in the country for three months at a time. It doesn’t matter which one you choose: According to the Federal Foreign Office, both must be applied in good time before departure.

  • crown, Admission is possible regardless of vaccination status.
  • Posture: 1 euro = 1.47 Australian dollars (as of 06/09/2022)
  • travel time: Das Barusa Valley A destination all year round. From May to September, the average Australian winter high temperature is 16 to 19 degrees. During the summer months, from November to March, they rise to 26 to 30 degrees.
  • information: Barossa Visitor Center, 66-68 Murray Street, Tanunda (Tel: 0061 1300 852 982; Email: visitorcentre@barossa.sa.gov.au; Internet: www.barossa.com)
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HS Football: Week 2 Results, Photos, Recaps & Featured Coverage, September 8-10 https://marlborough-monaco.com/hs-football-week-2-results-photos-recaps-featured-coverage-september-8-10/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:51:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/hs-football-week-2-results-photos-recaps-featured-coverage-september-8-10/ No 1 Bergen Catholic 21, No 13 Delbarton 6 Saturday September 10 LARGE POWER PLANT Hunterdon Central 28, Elizabeth 21 – Box Score Westfield 21, Union 14 – Box Score Bernards 35, South River 0 – Box Score Montgomery 35, Plainfield 7 – Box Score Cranford 42, Summit 23 – Box Score Piscataway 19, Franklin […]]]>

No 1 Bergen Catholic 21, No 13 Delbarton 6

Saturday September 10

LARGE POWER PLANT

Hunterdon Central 28, Elizabeth 21 – Box Score

Westfield 21, Union 14 – Box Score

Bernards 35, South River 0 – Box Score

Montgomery 35, Plainfield 7 – Box Score

Cranford 42, Summit 23 – Box Score

Piscataway 19, Franklin 14 – Box Score

INDEPENDENT

Sleepy Hollow (NY) 14, Morristown-Beard 10 – Box Score

NJIC

Lodi 24, Garfield 0 – Box Score

Pompton Lakes 10, Hawthorne 7 – Box Score

Wood-Ridge 40, St. Mary (Ruth.) 15 – Box Score

SFC

Cliffside Park 17, Dwight-Morrow 12 – Box Score

Indian Hills 13, Fair Lawn 0 – Box Score

Paterson Eastside 3, Columbia 0 – Box Score

Pope John 37, Catholic Paramus 36 – Box Score

Dickinson 16, Barringer 8 – Box Score

Bergen Catholic 21, Delbarton 6 – Box Score

Jefferson 34, Morris Hills 7 – Box Score

River Dell 30, Bergenfield 25 – Box Score

Madison 16, Hanover Park 14 – Box Score

Chatham 21, Warren Hills 20 – Box Score

Morristown 45, Millburn 7 – Box Score

Lenape Valley 35, Kittatinny 7 – Box Score

SHORE

Marlboro 35, Freehold Township 7 – Box Score

Colts Neck 50, Freehold Borough 13 – Box Score

Long Branch 34, Lacey 21 – Box Score

WJFL

Haddon Township 34, Princeton 27 – Box Score

Pemberton 32, Burlington City 22 – Box Score

Haddon Heights 55, KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy 0 – Box Score

Cherry Hill East 33, Florence 14 – Box Score

Salem 53, Pleasantville 6 – Box Score

Woodbury 32, Penns Grove 6 – Box Score

Hamilton West 14, Trenton 6 – Box Score

Pennsauken 34, Camden Eastside 6 – Box Score

Ocean City 21, Cedar Creek 7 – Box Score

Independent

Hun 49, Royal Imperial Collegiate (Canada) 6 – Box Score

Pennington 36, Rye Country Day (NY) 28 – Box Score

Pingry 19, Hopkins (CT) 12 – Box Score

Haddon Heights 55, KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy 0 – Box Score

Lawrenceville 47, Gilman (MD) 33 – Box Score

Sleepy Hollow (NY) 14, Morristown-Beard 10 – Box Score

No. 2 Don Bosco Prep 44, No. 3 St. Joseph (Mont.) 35

No. 7 Delsea 35, Winslow 25

No. 5 St. Peter’s Prep 23, No. 9 DePaul 10

No. 20 North Brunswick 13, Edison 10

No. 8 Ramapo 48, Wayne Hills 14

Friday, September 9

LARGE POWER PLANT

Dayton 20, Roselle Park 14 – Box Score

Perth Amboy 39, JP Stevens 14 – Box Score

Brearley 36, Spotswood 0 – Box Score

Old Bridge 27, South Brunswick 22 – Box Score

Phillipsburg 28, Ridge 10 – Box Score

Rahway 45, Lincoln 16 – Box Score

Govt. Livingston 31, North Plainfield 14 – Box Score

North Hunterdon 25, Watchung Hills 24 – Box Score

Linden 31, Woodbridge 0 – Box Score

St. Thomas Aquinas 43, Scotch Plains-Fanwood 0 – Box Score

Sayreville 22, New Brunswick 7 – Box Score

New Providence 21, Roselle 20 – Box Score

St. Joseph (Met.) 31, Somerville 15 – Box Score

South Hunterdon 40, Belvidere 7 – Box Score

Delaware Valley 38, Voorhees 7 – Box Score

Monroe 24, East Brunswick 14 – Box Score

Colonia 21, Iselin Kennedy 13 – Box Score

South Plainfield 13, Carteret 12 – Box Score

Hillsborough 17, Bridgewater-Raritan 6 – Box Score

Johnson 42, Bound Brook 0 – Box Score

Dunellen 29, Highland Park 14 – Box Score

Manville 21, Middlesex 14 – Box Score

North Brunswick 13, Edison 10 – Box Score

NJIC

Glen Rock 20, Becton 7 – Box Score

Waldwick 37, Manchester Regional 6 – Box Score

Rutherford 35, Lyndhurst 14 – Box Score

North Arlington 33, Saddle Brook 16 – Box Score

Elmwood Park 22, Palisades Park 13 – Box Score

Butler 28, Hasbrouck Heights 21 – Box Score

Park Ridge 31, Cresskill 14 – Box Score

Weehawken 39, Emerson Boro 0 – Box Score

Secaucus 43, New Milford 14 – Box Score

SFC

Hackensack 34, Paterson Kennedy 20 – Box Score

Montville 25, Mendham 21 – Box Score

Paramus 21, Pascack Valley 20 – Box Score

Demarest 34, West Milford 14 – Box Score

Old Tappan 28, Northern Highlands 0 – Box Score

Westwood 49, Dumont 0 – Box Score

West Essex 31, Passaic Valley 6 – Box Score

Ramapo 48, Wayne Hills 7 – Box Score

Rahway 45, Lincoln 16 – Box Score

Weequahic 6, Verona 2 – Box Score

Ridgewood 20, Clifton 13 – Box Score

Don Bosco Prep 44, St. Joseph (Montreal) 35 – Box Score

St. Peter’s Prep 23, DePaul 10 – Box Score

Cedar Grove 45, Shabazz 8 – Box Score

Irvington 27, East Orange 21 – Box Score

Newark East Side 40, Ferris 0 – Box Score

Union City 66, Livingston 7 – Box Score

Mahwah 14, Tenafly 12 – Box Score

Ramsey 48, Lakeland 27 – Box Score

Immaculata 50, Newark Central 0 – Box Score

Hackettstown 28, North Warren 7 – Box Score

Wallkill Valley 27, High Point 0 – Box Score

Caldwell 48, Pequannock 0 – Box Score

Hoboken 42, Newark Collegiate 36 – Box Score

Newton 48, Sussex Tech 14 – Box Score

Parsippany 28, Whippany Park 6 – Box Score

West Side 28, North Bergen 6 – Box Score

Boonton 40, Kinnelon 21 – Box Score

Fort Lee 35, Hopatcong 8 – Box Score

Mountain Lakes 33, Morris Catholic 14 – Box Score

Bayonne 18, Orange 12 – Box Score

West Orange 34, Bloomfield 7 – Box Score

Wayne Valley 49, Belleville 6 – Box Score

Morris Knolls 37, Parsippany Hills 21 – Box Score

Sparta 35, Vernon 20 – Box Score

Randolph 35, Roxbury 14 – Box Score

Passaic Tech 42, Passaic 0 – Box Score

Memorial 32, Kearny 14 – Box Score

West Morris 28, Mount Olive 0 – Box Score

SHORE

Brick Memorial 28, Red Bank Regional 14 – Box Score

Manchester Township 21, Toms River East 13 – Box Score

Jackson Memorial 20, Howell 19 – Box Score

Red Bank Catholic 25, Wall 3 – Box Score

Raritan 21, Monmouth 13 – Box Score

Ocean Township 43, Neptune 14 – Box Score

Toms River North 42, South 0 – Box Score

Middletown North 21, Central Regional 14 – Box Score

Middletown South 17, Manalapan 14 – Box Score

Point Pleasant Boro 39, Manasquan 13 – Box Score

Point Pleasant Beach 32, Keansburg 22 – Box Score

Keyport 30, Asbury Park 22 – Box Score

Donovan Catholic 22, Rumson-Fair Haven 0 – Box Score

Barnegat 7, Pinelands 6 – Box Score

St. John Vianney 34, Holmdel 27 – Box Score

Brick Township 29, Toms River South 8 – Box Score

Matawan 42, Jackson Liberty 7 – Box Score

WJFL

Lower Cape May 26, Pennsville 10 – Box Score

Kingsway 24, Washington Township 10 – Box Score

Seneca 27, Triton 26 – Box Score

Rancocas Valley 21, East 7 – Box Score

Clayton 20, Buena 12 – Box Score

Bordentown 8, Maple Tint 6 – Box Score

Cherokee 20, St. Augustine 14 – Box Score

Millville 49, Williamstown 28 – Box Score

Saint-Joseph (Hamm.) 30, Saint-Esprit 26 – Box score

Timber Creek 22, Willingboro 8 – Box Score

Paul VI 10, Cherry Hill West 8 – Box Score

Deptford 28, Audubon 14 – Box Score

Glassboro 16, Middle Township 11 – Box Score

Mainland 49, Oakcrest 0 – Box Score

Nottingham 14, Notre Dame 12 – Box Score

Steinert 20, Allentown 15 – Box Score

Atlantic City 32, Absegami 7 – Box Score

Egg Harbor 56, Bridgeton 0 – Box Score

Shawnee 14, Lenape 3 – Box Score

Cinnaminson 34, New Egypt 7 – Box Score

Woodstown 18, Paulsboro 0 – Box Score

Gloucester 35, Overbrook 0 – Box Score

Palmyra 42, Holy Cross Prep 12 – Box Score

Moorestown 24, Northern Burlington 21 – Box Score

Vineland 34, Clearview 14 – Box Score

Schalick 29, Wildwood 12 – Box Score

Delsea 35, Winslow 21 – Box Score

Pitman 21, Cumberland 20 – Box Score

Burlington Township 21, Delran 0 – Box Score

Hammonton 40, Highland 7 – Box Score

Gloucester Catholic 34, Bishop Eustace 6 – Box Score

Camden 46, Sterling 6 – Box Score

West Deptford 55, Camden Catholic 6 – Box Score

Collingswood 49, Gateway 7 – Box Score

Riverside 30, Lindenwold 0 – Box Score

Hopewell Valley 21, Ewing 13 – Box Score

Robbinsville 20, Hightstown 7 – Box Score

Lawrence 28, West Windsor-Plainsboro South 26 – Box Score

Independent

Blair 9, Kiski School (PA) 6 – Box Score

Montclair Kimberley 28, Newark Academy 14 – Box Score

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Lando Norris and Daniel Ricciardo show how to mix the iconic McLaren Papaya Orange paint https://marlborough-monaco.com/lando-norris-and-daniel-ricciardo-show-how-to-mix-the-iconic-mclaren-papaya-orange-paint/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 19:31:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/lando-norris-and-daniel-ricciardo-show-how-to-mix-the-iconic-mclaren-papaya-orange-paint/ With the recent signing of Oscar Piastri to the McLaren F1 team, the iconic racing team has once again found itself in the spotlight. Ditching fan-favorite driver Daniel Riccardo, the McLaren The F1 team is taking the opportunity to trot out the Australian driver at least once more before he loses one of the most […]]]>

With the recent signing of Oscar Piastri to the McLaren F1 team, the iconic racing team has once again found itself in the spotlight. Ditching fan-favorite driver Daniel Riccardo, the McLaren The F1 team is taking the opportunity to trot out the Australian driver at least once more before he loses one of the most lucrative seats in the F1 Paddock.


Alongside young British driver Lando Norris, the two drivers are in charge of creating and spraying the team’s main livery colour, papaya orange. Adorning the exterior of the team’s current cars, papaya orange is instantly recognizable, distinct from the rest of the paddock. Criticized for being garish by some fans, the orange papaya isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Although last season many fans were delighted with the special Gulf livery for the 2021 Monaco Grand Prix which saw Lando Norris score a podium finish. This marked a power shift in the F1 grid, with Mercedes not making an appearance on the winner’s podium.

Find out if Lando Norris and Daniel Riccardo can paint their legendary F1 color.

RELATED: 10 Things We Now Know About The McLaren Elva


What is McLaren’s Papaya Paint?

According to Mclaren, the team has a special relationship with the orange papaya. The color nearly returned in 2017. A darker shade called Tarocco appeared on the car alongside black and white highlights. The true papaya orange color returned to McLaren’s cars in 2018.

This came after a few decades where McLaren’s liveries were somewhat forgettable. Like McLaren Mercedes, the orange was more fluorescent and only highlighted certain aero parts, and especially certain sponsors. With Mika Hakkinen and Kimi Raikkonen at the helm, the team used more gray and silver in their liveries. A far cry from the team’s signature Marlboro livery which combined orange and cream. Orange made its first appearance in 1968. It was different from what Bruce McLaren had previously opted for silver, the racing color of his native New Zealand. Then, after a tumultuous first season for the McLaren team, he went red in 1967.

McLaren continues to claim the team made the switch to orange after McLaren partner Teddy Mayer saw an orange car racing in Britain. With nothing else racing using paint like this, the team applied a paint similar to the M6A in the 1967 Can-Am season. After seeing some success, the paint then came on the car of F1 for 1968.

How do you make McLaren’s Papaya Paint?

Sadly, Riccardo assured the Akzonobel Sikkens staff of “quality you can rely on”, if only that applied on the track as well. After putting on their coveralls and protective gloves, Norris and Riccardo can get to work. Presented with the coveted recipe, we learn that the toners are 361, 254.00 and 355. A language that only painters speak. Clearly, riders must arrive at exactly 134.9 grams regardless of the mixture. Then after that another 20 grams of a mysterious liquid.

Riccardo proclaims it’s “easy”, although replicating at home from Mclaren’s video would be somewhat difficult, with the exact quantities missing you can’t paint your car that color. Unless of course you own one of Mclaren’s supercars that come in this bright color like the 570 or the legendary McLaren P1.

RELATED:10 Reasons We Love The McLaren Speedtail

How does McLaren’s Papaya Paint Spray work?

Handing the spray gun to Lando Norris, Akzonobel-Sikkens lets him know that the longer you hold the trigger, the more he sprays. A concept similar to that of the accelerator, which the F1 driver surely knows by now. To protect themselves from aerosol paint fumes, drivers don their paint helmet equipped with a balaclava. These have their own breathing apparatus.

Instructed to hold their spray gun just a hand’s breadth from the panel of their spray, they get to work. As usual, the two McLaren drivers take the opportunity to show their distinct personalities. Riccardo sprays a bit haphazardly giving a generous coating. Norris takes a more methodical approach, even calling his work a “masterpiece”.

The two drivers leave the paint shop with a certificate of mixing and spraying papaya orange. An achievement that many F1 fans would love to have framed on their walls. Interestingly, McLaren presents the work of its driver. Norris and Riccardo’s work looks somewhat identical, after all with the same machines and the same recipe, how can they achieve different results? For those following the latest seasons of the sport, hopefully the irony is not lost. A bright shade of McLaren’s famous Payapa orange, it’s not quite what appears on the current season’s car, it has a more matte finish. But the pilots successfully match the hue.

Spraying only a small sample, they will need a lot more practice before the team can let them loose on any car. So you should by no means expect to see drivers painting their own cars anytime soon. Although with the lowering of the budget cap, nothing is entirely out of place.

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Pianist Filippo Gorini ‘gets Bach’, reinvents a master’s catalog https://marlborough-monaco.com/pianist-filippo-gorini-gets-bach-reinvents-a-masters-catalog/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 16:05:54 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/pianist-filippo-gorini-gets-bach-reinvents-a-masters-catalog/ Breadcrumb Links Music Entertainment The young Italian musician brings landmark compositions from the past to the present, is an advanced musical thinker beyond his tender years Italian pianist Filippo Gorini, who will perform at the Vancouver Playhouse on September 18, has won several awards, including the very prestigious Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award in 2020. Photo by […]]]>

The young Italian musician brings landmark compositions from the past to the present, is an advanced musical thinker beyond his tender years

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The Vancouver Recital Society presents Filippo Gorini, piano

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When: Sunday, September 18, 2 p.m.

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Where: Vancouver Playhouse, 600 Hamilton Street

Tickets, more info: vanrecital.com


One of the great joys of classical music is seeing great works become new and exciting as young performers reinvent them.

There could be no better example than the opening concert of the Vancouver Recital Society’s fall season, during which Italian pianist Filippo Gorini will discuss Bach’s The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080.

For those of us who heard Gorini’s Canadian debut in 2019, his return to the Vancouver Playhouse couldn’t come soon enough. What we heard from the 20-something performer was not only an astonishing recital but also a display of a musical thinker far beyond his still tender years.

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Really, the audacity to associate Stockhausen’s Klavierstuck IX with Beethoven’s Opus 111 sonata! This breathtaking conjunction left his audience flabbergasted, enriched and delighted.

Gorini continues to get better and better. It has already won more than enough awards to last a lifetime, including first prize and audience award at the Telekom-Beethoven Competition in Bonn in 2015 and the very prestigious Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award in 2020.

This year, her summer vacation was spent at Marlboro Music, Vermont’s ultra-elite program started by the legendary Rudolf Serkin and currently co-directed by Mitsuko Uchida and Jonathan Biss.

What does Gorini have in store for us this September? Nothing less than an overhaul of what it’s like to play music in the post-pandemic environment; a mini-residence with an awareness-raising film project; and a complete interpretation of The Art of Fugue.

The Art of the Fugue and the Musical Offerings, BWV 1079, are the twin peaks of Bach’s catalogue. The first consists of 18 pieces, fugues of all kinds and a canon quartet, written in Bach’s last decade and published posthumously in 1751.

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We apologize, but this video failed to load.

A demonstration of contrapuntal prowess, it has never been equalled. Part of the mystique of the work comes from the fact that the original does not indicate instrumentation; scholars and dedicated gamers alike love to debate how this can be achieved in real-life performances. Gorini will play it on the VRS Hamburg Steinway grand piano.

It will not be a fly-in/fly-out proposal. Gorini will be in and around town for much of the week. He is due to perform – if BC Ferries wants him – for Frances Heinsheimer Wainwright’s Coast Recital Society on the Sunshine Coast, a day before his event in Vancouver.

At the Playhouse, he plans to present The Art of the Fugue with a pre-concert presentation at 2 p.m. before his afternoon performance begins at 3 p.m.; then he’ll stick around for a Q&A with the audience after the concert.

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But there is still more on the road. Gorini has created a series of filmed conversations with the likes of Canadian-born architect Frank Gehry, pianist Alfred Brendel, director Peter Sellars and choreographer Sasha Waltz that will be available online to VRS subscribers.

What drove this extraordinary project? Gorini explains on his website, filippogorini.it: “In February 2020, with regained time and a thirst for something deep, I devised a plan for a unique exploration. My work on The Art of Fugue, mystical and unfinished masterpiece by Johann Sebastian Bach, had begun in 2013, but it was only thanks to these long months of silence and the support of the Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award that I have been able to study it with enough dedication to offer it to the public.

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Like most true Bach enthusiasts, Gorini has no intention of treating the work as just a great landmark composition from the past. “In addition to my game, I have prepared a collection of material to explore it further, not seeing it as a fixed monument to the past, but rather as a living dialogue with contemporary culture.”

Could Gorini’s holistic approach to Bach’s historic oeuvre be a demonstration of how our best and brightest performers are exploring the future of post-pandemic concert? We will know in mid-September.


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In Narragansett, Boon Street Presbyterian Church is rising https://marlborough-monaco.com/in-narragansett-boon-street-presbyterian-church-is-rising/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/in-narragansett-boon-street-presbyterian-church-is-rising/ A Google Maps view of the property before reconstruction began in 2021. The old stone tower was all that was left of the old church, which had been turned into a garage.Peter DeMarco for the Boston Globe When architect and developer Craig Miller stumbled across the dilapidated property five years ago while vacationing with his […]]]>
A Google Maps view of the property before reconstruction began in 2021. The old stone tower was all that was left of the old church, which had been turned into a garage.Peter DeMarco for the Boston Globe

When architect and developer Craig Miller stumbled across the dilapidated property five years ago while vacationing with his family, he had no idea what he was looking at. “It had a flat roof and a tower. I thought it was a fire station,” he said.

Intrigued, he called the phone number on the sales panel. “The broker called me back, he showed me a picture of what it was, and I said, ‘Oh, we have no choice. We have to hand it over as a church,” said Miller, president of the Waterfield Design Group of Winchester, Mass.

Now the building has been resurrected, in a sense. And on August 29, as construction drew to a close, the most iconic element of the old church was restored.

As dozens of people watched, cellphone cameras at the ready, a giant crane lifted the 9,000-pound, 13-foot-tall belfry and 10,500-pound, 29-foot-tall shingled spire off the ground at the site , and maneuvered them into place atop the tall granite tower.

A small crowd of people gathered to watch the belfry be placed atop the stone tower on August 29, 2022, one of the final stages in the rebuilding of what was once Boon Street Church in Narragansett. PETER DEMARCO FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE

While the exterior is a near-replica of the original church, Miller has made some major changes inside: the building will house a pair of luxury condominiums instead of a new congregation.

Marketed as “114 Boon Street Narragansett,” the condos will feature solar panels, elevators, covered balconies, open floor plans, and 12-foot ceilings. One of the units, with stunning views of Narragansett Bay just down the street, could fetch $3-4 million.

While some are upset that the building is no longer being used as a church, most locals embraced the project, understanding that Miller had no obligation to honor the church’s history or preserve the church’s appearance. property, as it is just outside of Narragansett. official historic district.

“This plot could have been developed into so many different things that wouldn’t have made people happy,” said Vincent Indeglia, a Narragansett planning board member for 13 years. “Then comes someone like Craig who wants to do this unsolicited. He’s like a lottery ticket that you scratch and win $5 million.

From a single grainy photo of the church taken around 1885 and a simple architect’s sketch from 1874, Miller dove into the project. Construction began last year and accelerated this spring.

A drawing of Boon Street Presbyterian Church, circa 1874.Photo to hand out
A final concept design for the 114 Boon Street Narragansett project, where the exterior is a near-replica of the old Boon Street Presbyterian Church, but the interior will house two luxury condominiums.Courtesy of Waterfield Design Group

Miller commissioned a Chicago metal shop to recreate the church’s 5-foot ornate copper cross. He reused 5,000 feet of timber flooring from a century-old Taunton mill and located the church’s original herringbone timber entrance doors. Each window plan has been crafted to look like it’s from the 19th century, with Miller going so far as to include three “dummy” windows that match those in the old photograph, but are bricked up inside as they are located on the middle floor.

The building’s masonry – blocks of pink and orange-hued granite believed to have come from a quarry in Westerly – has been restored to its original luster through repeated washings and weeks of repointing work by an array of stonemasons, which left a lot of stone visible inside to serve as a link to the past.

Although there is no bell in the belfry, residents can climb the steep stairs to admire the city, and there will be LED lighting that can glow in different colors. “If the Red Sox win the World Series, we can make it blue and red,” Miller said.

Architect and developer Craig Miller, president of the Waterfield Design Group of Winchester, Massachusetts, stands on the rooftop of his Boon Street project in Narragansett, RI in July 2022.Peter DeMarco for the Boston Globe

Miller plans to live with his family in one of the units. Does he think people will ring his doorbell on Sunday morning, expecting to be allowed in?

“One of the neighbors suggested we have services, like at Easter,” he said. “Me and my family, we have a religious background. We work a lot in Haiti and Ecuador with missions, with an orphanage. So for our family to have a connection with a faith-based building, that works really well for us.

This faith was tested while working on the Boon Street project. There have been many delays – Covid, clearance issues and supply chain shortages among them. And, more recently, the elevation of the belfry almost did not take place.

First there was an unexpected problem with the top of the concrete tower – which lost all morning. Then the crew wasted a few more hours searching for an essential drill bit. They managed to raise the base of the belfry, but when the sun started to set it looked like they simply lacked daylight to get the wooden shingle spire. at the top.

“I think he did the right thing in bringing this back because there are a lot of memories here,” said onlooker Merrick Cook Jr., 82, of Narragansett, who followed the construction. “It will go up.”

At 7 p.m., Miller and his structural engineer, Mike Grafe, performed a final check to see if the tow lines were secure. Crane operator Brent S. Dexter received the signal and the last piece was lifted off the ground – very, very slowly. A minute later, the remaining crowd erupted in applause – the belfry was full.

So does the implausible resurrection of the Boon Street Presbyterian Church.

Raising the belfry on the 114 Boon Street Narragansett project in Rhode Island
The belfry is elevated at the old reconstructed Boon Street Church in Narragansett, which is being converted into condos. (Video by Steve Osemwenkhae)
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flautism | University of Nevada, Reno https://marlborough-monaco.com/flautism-university-of-nevada-reno/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 08:18:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/flautism-university-of-nevada-reno/ Demarre McGill, flute Demarre McGill is a leading soloist, recitalist, chamber musician and orchestral musician. Recipient of an Avery Fisher Career Fellowship, he performed as a soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Seattle, Pittsburgh, Dallas, San Diego and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras and, at age 15, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra . In 2018 he performed and […]]]>

Demarre McGill, flute

Demarre McGill is a leading soloist, recitalist, chamber musician and orchestral musician. Recipient of an Avery Fisher Career Fellowship, he performed as a soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Seattle, Pittsburgh, Dallas, San Diego and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras and, at age 15, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra . In 2018 he performed and presented master classes in South Africa, Korea and Japan, was a soloist with the New York Youth Symphony at Carnegie Hall and on May 20, 2018 performed with the Cathedral Choral Society at the National Cathedral from Washington DC in a program called “Bernstein the Humanitarian.”

Today, principal flute of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, he was previously principal flute of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony Orchestra, the Florida Orchestra and the Orchestra of Santa Fe Opera. He recently served as Acting Principal Flute with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and earlier with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

A founding member of the Myriad Trio and former member of Chamber Music Society Two, Demarre has performed at chamber music festivals in Aspen, Santa Fe, Marlboro, Seattle and Stellenbosch, to name a few. He is the co-founder of The Art of Élan and, along with clarinetist Anthony McGill and pianist Michael McHale, founded the McGill/McHale Trio in 2014. Their debut CD, “Portraits”, released in August 2017, received rave reviews .

Media credits include appearances on PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center, A&E Network’s The Gifted Ones, NBC’s Today Show, NBC Nightly News and with brother Anthony when they were teenagers in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood.

Originally from Chicago, Demarre McGill began studying the flute at the age of seven and attended the Merit School of Music. In the years that followed, until he left Chicago, he studied with Susan Levitin. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Curtis Institute of Music and a master’s degree from the Juilliard School. In September 2017, he was appointed Visiting Assistant Professor of Flute at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

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Thursday Night Football is coming to the Jersey Shore https://marlborough-monaco.com/thursday-night-football-is-coming-to-the-jersey-shore/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 12:20:34 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/thursday-night-football-is-coming-to-the-jersey-shore/ A few great days at the beach ahead and maybe the last chance for the kids to swim, surf or just relax before school starts. Meanwhile, almost all of the 42 Shore Football Schools will be in action this weekend before most if not all of them even start lessons. With Labor Day weekend being […]]]>

A few great days at the beach ahead and maybe the last chance for the kids to swim, surf or just relax before school starts. Meanwhile, almost all of the 42 Shore Football Schools will be in action this weekend before most if not all of them even start lessons. With Labor Day weekend being the regular start of the season this year and with many teams wanting to stay away from the holidays (and traffic), there are actually 10 games being played tonight. The schedule will be highlighted by a game between Toms River in which the East Raiders visit the South Indians where Matt Martin will make his head coaching debut.

Another freshman coach is John Tierney at Pinelands with the Wildcats to host Point Beach while Jackson Liberty entertains Keansburg where Jim Reid makes his Titans debut. If you like the idea of ​​Thursday Night Football, there are plenty of other games, including Brick Memorial at the Jackson Memorial. These teams have faced each other in some classic matchups in the past when they were both part of the old “A South” division. Brick will be at home against Marlboro, Central will travel to Howell, Point Boro will host Neptune, Barnegat will head north to Freehold Township, Ocean will be at home against Holmdel and Raritan will visit Matawan.

There are also 7 games on Friday including Lacey at Donovan Catholic and Saturday’s schedule includes Toms River North v Rumson in the Rumble on the Raritan at Rutgers while Manchester and new manager Tommy Farrell visit Lakewood.

For details, scoreboards and more visit www.shoresportsnetwork.com

By the way, Monmouth University is making its Colonial Athletic Conference debut tonight when it visits the University of New Hampshire.

10 Movie Remakes That Were Better Than The Original

Sometimes a movie reboot turns out to be an improvement over the one that came before it. Here are 10 movies whose remakes were better than the original movie.

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Boston Labor Day Events for 2022 https://marlborough-monaco.com/boston-labor-day-events-for-2022/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 19:23:55 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/boston-labor-day-events-for-2022/ Boston Labor Day Events | Image Credit: Marlborough Labor Day Parade Labor Day is so close! And while that also means the end of summer, that doesn’t mean the fun is going to stop anytime soon. On the contrary, Labor Day in Boston means so much more fun and excitement. And right now, there’s already […]]]>

Boston Labor Day Events | Image Credit: Marlborough Labor Day Parade

Labor Day is so close! And while that also means the end of summer, that doesn’t mean the fun is going to stop anytime soon. On the contrary, Labor Day in Boston means so much more fun and excitement. And right now, there’s already a fantastic lineup of Labor Day events in Boston just waiting for you.

From festivals and cruises to light shows and foodie events, Labor Day weekend in Boston is filled with tons of things to do with family, friends or special someone. If you don’t know where to start, don’t worry because we have prepared a special list just for you!


Deal Alert – Whale Watching Cruise for One, Two or Four Adults from Cape Ann (Up to 37% Off)

Image 5: Up to 37% off Whale Watching Cruise from Cape Ann Whale Watch

Take the opportunity for a unique whale watching tour in their natural habitat.

  • Departure time varies, check website for schedule.
  • Departure location: 415 Main Street, Gloucester, MA.
  • Adult tickets are valid for ages 17 and up.
  • Reservations must be made for babies and children.
  • Free parking for each customer
  • What to bring? camera, sweater or jacket, sneakers or rubber soled shoes, sunglasses, hat and sunscreen.

Check out the additional details, guidelines and fine print and book your Cape Ann whale watching cruise TODAY!!!


Labor Day Events in Boston – Top Activities for 2022

Marlborough Labor Day Parade

Boston Labor Day Events |  Marlborough Labor Day Parade

Image Credit: Marlborough Labor Day Parade

If you’re going out of town this Labor Day weekend in Boston, why not stop by the Marlborough Labor Day Parade in New England? It’s the biggest and most prestigious Labor Day parade in the area and it’s a great event to take the kids to. There will be a variety of bands, many impressive floats and of course spectacular performers that are sure to make your day. This year will be the 70th year of the parade, so expect plenty of sights to see and make memories!
When: Monday, September 5, 2022, 9 a.m.
Where: Lincoln Street and Pleasant Street, Marlborough, MA 01752
How much: Free


Martha’s Vineyard Labor Day Weekend Festival 2022

Boston Labor Day Events |  Martha's Vineyard Labor Day Weekend Festival

Image credit: Festivals of vineyard artisans

Martha’s Vineyard’s Biggest Art Show is on Labor Day weekend in Boston! Watch a weaver make a beautiful scarf from wool harvested from her own herd. Hear the enchanting story of the island’s only female blacksmith on how she forged her lovely bracelets. Or watch a young island artist create his latest masterpiece right before your eyes. Live all these experiences and many more, unique and memorable.
When: Sunday 2 – 4 September 2022, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. for the opening night | 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily
Where: The Ag Hall, 35 Panhandle Road, West Tisbury, MA 02575
How much: Free


Connecticut Renaissance Fair

Boston Labor Day Events |  The Connecticut Renaissance Fair

Image credit: The Connecticut Renaissance Faire

Celebrate Labor Day weekend in Boston with a bit of fairy tales at the Connecticut Renaissance Faire. It’s only a 45-minute drive from Boston and you can feast like a king on turkey legs and local craft beers, shop like a queen at the Medieval Marketplace and laugh like a fool at the various shows in the village. Costumes are encouraged but not required.
When: Friday, September 3, 2022, 10:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Where: The Connecticut Renaissance Faire, 122 Mack Rd, Lebanon, CT 06249
How much: $15


Deal Alert – Boston Duck Boat Sightseeing City Tour with Charles River Cruise

  • Climb aboard a Duck, a refurbished World War II amphibious vehicle, for a comprehensive tour of Boston.
  • Pass by Boston Common, Quincy Market and the Celtics home ground at TD Garden.
  • Then dive into the Charles River to admire the city by boat.
  • Learn all about Boston’s history and landmarks as you go.
  • Guided Boston Duck Boat Tour Narrated tour of Boston by land and water with your own personal ConDUCKtor®

Get more details, and fine print, and book your Boston Duck Sightseeing Tour TODAY!!!


Boston Labor Day Events – Continued

Red Sox vs Rangers

Boston Labor Day Weekend Events |  Red Sox vs Rangers

Photo credit: Boston Red Sox

This year’s Labor Day weekend in Boston is one of the perfect times to get out and enjoy an exciting game with baseball-loving friends or family. The Red Sox will play at Fenway this weekend against the Texas Rangers. Grab a Fenway Frank, drink a cold beer and cheer on your favorite team!
When: Friday, September 2 – 4, 2022, 7:10 p.m. 5 p.m.
Where: Fenway Park, 4 Jersey Street, Boston, MA 02215
How much: From $25


Chinatown Lantern Festival

Along with Labor Day, Chinatown also celebrates the Mid-Autumn Lantern Festival. Enjoy not only stunning lanterns and lantern shows, but also lion dances, martial arts performances, opera singing and more. There will also be plenty of vendors selling authentic Chinese food and drink. Don’t miss it!
When: Saturday September 3, 2022, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Where: Rose Kennedy Greenway – Auntie Kay and Uncle Frank Chin Park, John F Fitzgerald Surface Rd, Boston, MA 02111
How much: Free


Greek holiday 2022

As well as the Marlborough New England Labor Day Parade, there’s also the Greek Festival, so if you’re heading out for the weekend near Boston, check it out! There will be plenty of Greek food, Greek dancing, live music and spectacular shows to see. Put it in the itinerary now!
When: Sunday, September 4, 2022, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Where: Sts. Anargyroi Greek Orthodox Church, 9 Central St, Marlborough, MA 01752
How much: Free


Deal Alert – Trolley Tour For One, Two Or Four (Up To 35% Off)

Image 1: Up to 35% off Historic Trolley Tours at Cityview Trolley Tours

Historic sites headline a tram tour that offers sweeping views of the city.

  • Trolleys start operating at 9:00 am and run every 10-15 minutes April-August, 20-30 minutes September-November, off season (closed, December-March).
  • Click here to see a map of boarding locations and the tram timetable
  • Notable sites: Quincy Market, Boston Common, Old South Church and the site of the Boston Tea Party
  • Tour does not include entry to the Harbor Cruise or any other attractions
  • Note: Trolley vouchers must be redeemed prior to commencing your visit at the CityView Trolley kiosks located on the Atlantic Ave side. of the 255 State St. Building.

Check out additional details, guidelines and fine print, and book your Boston Trolley Tour TODAY!!!


Labor Day Weekend Block Party

Summer may be coming to an end, but that doesn’t mean the party is over. Head to the Speedway for the second annual Speedway Block Party. Expect plenty of food, drink, entertainment and shopping. So mark the date, make plans with friends or dates, and get ready for an epic summer blast!
When: Thursday, September 4, 2022, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: Charles River Speedway, 525 Western Ave, Brighton, MA 02135
How much: Free

Are there any other Labor Day events in Boston you plan to attend? Comment below and let us know!


Stay up to date with the latest happenings and activities in the Boston area with our weekly updates on things to do in Boston this week and things to do in Boston this weekend

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Latest articles by Liezel L. (see everything)
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It was a mystery in the desert for 50 years https://marlborough-monaco.com/it-was-a-mystery-in-the-desert-for-50-years/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/it-was-a-mystery-in-the-desert-for-50-years/ Photographs of Todd HeislerVideo by Noah Throop August 19, 2022 Almost everything about Michael Heizer’s land art megasculpture called “City” can seem confusing. That it’s a mile and a half long and nearly half a mile wide, right in the middle of a remote stretch of Nevada’s high desert, where what passes for a neighbor […]]]>

Almost everything about Michael Heizer’s land art megasculpture called “City” can seem confusing. That it’s a mile and a half long and nearly half a mile wide, right in the middle of a remote stretch of Nevada’s high desert, where what passes for a neighbor is Area 51. the closest is an hour away, on a dusty and bumpy old cattle trail, through some mountain ranges. That it cost $40 million to build.

Even it is called “City”. It is a city in name only. Mounds of earth, roads, knolls, and well-maintained depressions, like dry lake beds, spread out in no immediately obvious order and in different directions. At both ends of the site, monumental structures riff on ancient ruins.

Now, half a century after Heizer drove his first shovel into the ground, “City” is finally opening up to visitors, perhaps the most incredible thing of all. It had become the artistic version of ancient Atlantis, a chimera.

Art-world Atlantis will soon be accepting reservations. Even so, its creator, the 1970s downtown New York toast who turned into art’s Fitzcarraldo, still doesn’t consider “City” complete.

“I’m a fool, alone, watching helplessly as they wait for me to die so they can turn my ranch into a gift shop and motel,” Heizer told me here this spring. At 77, in rapidly declining health, he is still just as pessimistic. “It’s a masterpiece, almost,” he said, “and I’m the only one who cares if the thing is actually done.”

None of this is true.

Except the masterpiece part.

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What is your favorite video game OST? I will go first https://marlborough-monaco.com/what-is-your-favorite-video-game-ost-i-will-go-first/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/what-is-your-favorite-video-game-ost-i-will-go-first/ Here I am, once again, looking for player opinions. Like I said before, I love it. I love hearing about people’s personal experiences with video games. It makes me smile. I love knowing a game made you cry, I love knowing a game took years off your life. I have a lot of games that […]]]>

Here I am, once again, looking for player opinions.

Like I said before, I love it. I love hearing about people’s personal experiences with video games. It makes me smile. I love knowing a game made you cry, I love knowing a game took years off your life. I have a lot of games that have done these things to me, and I’ve talked about them at length before.

So here I am again with a simple question:

This is a difficult question for many players, myself included. It’s really hard to choose a single video game soundtrack that is harsh or takes us back to when we first played the game.

In my opinion, as someone who writes about video games, makes music, has a deep love for video game music, and even made music for an unreleased video game project in the past, I I feel like I can talk about it at length.

When I think of what makes a video game soundtrack, there are a few things that come to mind. Most importantly, however, is that it should be a piece of music intrinsically tied to the game it originated from, that sounds great, makes a name for itself, but sits comfortably in the background. Another special thing that can make a video game soundtrack great that isn’t very common is if it’s used as part of the gameplay. I believe The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is a great example.

As mentioned, choosing a favorite soundtrack from a video game is difficult, because there are so many good ones. That’s why I’m open to accepting a top 3, only because that’s exactly what I’m going to do when I tell you mine.

  • Subtitle – It is quite appropriate that the soundtrack of my favorite game is also from my favorite game. Maybe it’s because the soundtrack is part of what made it my favorite game. SubtitleThe soundtrack of , every time I listen to it, kind of takes me back to when I played it. Very precisely, each track (even the covers) is so emblematic of each field that I feel transported every moment of this game from which they come. I love it. Toby Fox really killed this one, I’m not going to lie.
  • Journey – Honestly, this soundtrack just makes me cry. Just like the game did. It’s hard to believe that the composition of the soundtrack was so simple, which I only learned after “re-imagining” JourneyThe soundtrack of was released this year. Beautiful things.
  • We love Katamari – Yeah, that soundtrack just slaps. I can’t say much else. We love KatamariThe soundtrack goes just like hell. I feel immense joy every time I listen to it. It rocks.
  • Oh my god, there are so many more. It’s hard. Why did I do this? There are so many others.

As you can see, the question above was a tweet. This elicited many responses. Here are a few, so you can see if your tastes match:

And of course, the only correct answer:

These are just a few answers provided, but now I turn to you. Which video game soundtrack is your favorite? Which one really stayed with you? Which one did you save on Spotify or bookmark on YouTube? Let us know!

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