Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:48:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 10 must-see exhibitions in October https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-october/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-october/ In October, Warren Feeney is delighted to discover that contemporary Pacific art brings five exhibitions to life in Ōtautahi, the 2021 Parkin Drawing Prize winner presents an exhibition of new work, and the DIY attitude of the artists of Flying Nun is the key. to the success of Hellzapoppin ‘! 1. Hellzapoppin ‘! The art […]]]>

In October, Warren Feeney is delighted to discover that contemporary Pacific art brings five exhibitions to life in Ōtautahi, the 2021 Parkin Drawing Prize winner presents an exhibition of new work, and the DIY attitude of the artists of Flying Nun is the key. to the success of Hellzapoppin ‘!

1. Hellzapoppin ‘! The art of the flying nun, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, corner of Worcester Blvd and Montreal St. In 1981, the art of Flying Nun seemed to be an outsider. No one could have imagined asking: is there an art history context for Flying Nun? But time has seriously supported the music, record covers, posters and videos of Flying Nun. His do-it-yourself anarchic spirit is fundamental to his inspiring attitude, confirming that while France may have its history on Impressionism, Christchurch has its own exceptional art history, all about Flying Nun. September 17 – November 28.

Mark Braunias, Puss G 2000, 2021, acrylic on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Mark Braunias, Puss G 2000, 2021, acrylic on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

2. Marc Braunias, In search of the saccharin underground, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham. The recent winner of the Parkin Drawing Award, the successful entry of Mark Braunias, In search of the Saccharine Underground, is also the title of his exhibition. Braunias was a fitting winner, the fundamentals of his art hinged on ‘taking a line for a walk’, with judge Sarah Farrar commenting that Braunias’ art and his’ raspy energy are unstoppable and hard to ignore ‘. October 8 – November 20.

Sage Rossie, My Body Is My Vehicle, photography, Digital media (Eastside Gallery, Linwood)

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Sage Rossie, My Body Is My Vehicle, photography, Digital media (Eastside Gallery, Linwood)

3. Spring surfaces, Eastside Gallery, 388 Worcester St. Spring is here and Spring surfaces is a group show celebrating the occasion through a range of media and strategies by Alix Ashworth, Magdelane Clare, Joe Clarke, Linda James, Sage Rossie and Helene Olivia Smith. Rossie’s My body is my vehicle and his awakening figures are both photography and performance, revealing the enduring influence of 1970s conceptual art and its ability to continue to surprise and challenge. October 1 – November 5.

Tony de Lautour Looking Out For Pleasure, 2021, acrylic & oil on canvas, (NMG)

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Tony de Lautour Looking Out For Pleasure, 2021, acrylic & oil on canvas, (NMG)

4. Tony de Lautour, Market of the senses, NMG, Wynn William House, 47 Hereford St. Over the past decade, geometric shapes, squares, rectangles and triangles have presided over Tony de Lautour’s paintings, disguised as curious entities. More and more, the spaces between these enigmatic forms have continued to expand, drawing attention to their stillness and calm and increasing the pleasure of meeting again with an artist whose practice continues to reconsider itself anew. 1-30 October.

Dr Tarisi Sorovi-Vunidilo, Margaret Aull, Donita Vatuinaruku Hulme, Joana Monolagi, Dulcie Stewart and Luisa Tora, iLakolako ni weniqia: A Veiqia Project (installation view), 2021. (The physics room)

Janneth gil

Dr Tarisi Sorovi-Vunidilo, Margaret Aull, Donita Vatuinaruku Hulme, Joana Monolagi, Dulcie Stewart and Luisa Tora, iLakolako ni weniqia: A Veiqia Project (installation view), 2021. (The physics room)

5. iLakolako ni weniqia: an exhibition of the Veiqia project, The Physics Room, 301, rue Montréal The Veiqia project brings together artists, curators, researchers and academics: Dr Tarisi Sorovi-Vunidilo, Margaret Aull, Donita Vatuinaruku Hulme, Joana Monolagi, Dulcie Stewart and Luisa Tora. Their intentions are specifically recognized in three ancestral female matakau figures sculpted by Aull, their presence “breathing life” into the gallery and implicitly the spaces beyond. Indeed, its success is arguably measurable in four additional exhibitions of Pacific art in nearby galleries. September 25 – October 31.

Richard Elderton, Leaves, 2021, oil on canvas (The Den)

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Richard Elderton, Leaves, 2021, oil on canvas (The Den)

6. Richard Elderton, Beyond the surface, The Den, 181 High St. Beyond the surface is Richard Elderton’s first solo exhibition and a series of paintings that confirm his transition from purely abstract to figurative. Or are they doing it? Externally, Beyond the surface promises a view of land and nature – but avoids delivery, acknowledging our expectations and insisting that time can be better spent in an experiment on paint, color, surface, form and space, and painting as its own tangible reality. September 28 – October 18.

Michael Michaels, Life Beginnings II, 04 11 and 06 11 2021, glazed ceramic (Chamber Gallery Rangiora)

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Michael Michaels, Life Beginnings II, 04 11 and 06 11 2021, glazed ceramic (Chamber Gallery Rangiora)

7. Michael Michaels, Beginning of life II, Chamber Gallery, Rangiora Library, 141 Percival St. Michael Michaels is a ceramic sculptor who does work as conceptual as it is on his physical presence, his artistic practice sharing his attitude with a group of dedicated artists that includes Madeleine Child and Cheryl Lucas . The Beginnings of Life II sees him complete a previous series of 23 years, his animated and overly human subjects inviting comparison with the anthropomorphic ceramic figures of Picasso. Oct. 3 – Nov. 4

Maurice Lye, Fold, c. 1981, printed 2021, archival pigment on cotton rag paper (PGgallery192)

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Maurice Lye, Fold, c. 1981, printed 2021, archival pigment on cotton rag paper (PGgallery192)

8. Maurice Lye, Back home, PGgallery192, 192 Bealey Ave. Back home is the first solo exhibition of photographer and designer based in Ōtautahi Maurice Lye since 2009. Interviewed by Photo Forum in 2019 he described himself as an introvert, but that’s somewhat erased, his photographs highlighting our unexpected associations with places and spaces and the meaning of such relationships in our lives. October 19 – November 11.

Chauncey Flay, Osterns Quarry Greywacke Bunker 39-1, Greywacke from New Zealand, (The Central Art Gallery)

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Chauncey Flay, Osterns Quarry Greywacke Bunker 39-1, Greywacke from New Zealand, (The Central Art Gallery)

9. Chauncey Flay, His first exhibition in Christchurch, The central art gallery. Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, 2 Worcester Blvd. The artist as an alchemist is rooted in Western art and popular notions of material transformation. Artist Chauncey Flay fits the Alchemist’s description perfectly, exhibiting objects, designed and made in coral, grauwacke marble, stainless steel, brick, stone and argillite, their transformation testifying to a philosophy on the relationships of the humanity with place, belonging and the material world. October 14 – November 14.

Mitchell Bright, Untitled (Ibid: In the same place), 2021, inkjet prints on glossy paper, and shot with 6 x 7 negative film (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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Mitchell Bright, Untitled (Ibid: In the same place), 2021, inkjet prints on glossy paper, and shot with 6 x 7 negative film (Ilam Campus Gallery)

10. Mitchell Bright, Same: In the same place, Ilam Campus Gallery, University of Canterbury. In late 2019, photographer Mitchell Bright traveled across the United States, visiting places he had “looked at countless times through the lenses of some of my biggest influences …” – which explains the ironic title of the exhibition. Mitchell’s images of the American landscape are very much like home, the silence, stillness, and expansive views of the land, revealing another irony – the must-see evidence of industry and commerce, an uncommunicative presence and thoughtfulness. frightening about the state of the planet Earth. September 24 – October 22.


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Aigantighe art gallery reopens with two exhibitions after lockdown https://marlborough-monaco.com/aigantighe-art-gallery-reopens-with-two-exhibitions-after-lockdown/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/aigantighe-art-gallery-reopens-with-two-exhibitions-after-lockdown/ JOHN BISSET / Stuff While setting up the South Canterbury Pottery Group’s new exhibit, The Alchemists, at the Aigantighe Art Gallery, Kat Boland holds a tall glass of salt from guest potter Ian Dalzell. It was a special day for the Aigantighe art gallery when it reopened on Tuesday, for the first time since lockdown. […]]]>
While setting up the South Canterbury Pottery Group's new exhibit, The Alchemists, at the Aigantighe Art Gallery, Kat Boland holds a tall glass of salt from guest potter Ian Dalzell.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

While setting up the South Canterbury Pottery Group’s new exhibit, The Alchemists, at the Aigantighe Art Gallery, Kat Boland holds a tall glass of salt from guest potter Ian Dalzell.

It was a special day for the Aigantighe art gallery when it reopened on Tuesday, for the first time since lockdown.

Staff are busy setting up the South Canterbury Pottery Group and Aoraki Broderers’ Guild exhibits, both of which will open on Saturday.

Exhibitions curator Hamish Pettengell said it was nice to come back to the gallery and set up the new exhibits.

“It’s good to celebrate local talent.

READ MORE:
* The Aigantighe art gallery celebrates its 65th anniversary

The 49th annual potters’ exhibition is called, Alchemistsbecause it understands different mediums, Pettengell said.

West Coast Kotuku Pottery owner Ian Dalzell has selected the pieces for display and will also be a guest potter. Dalzell has been pot pot full time since 1980 and draws inspiration from the organic forms of the landscape.

The other guest potter is Mandy Gargiulo of Nelson who works exclusively with porcelain, according to the South Canterbury Pottery Group.

Aigantighe Art Gallery visitor host Diana Peneanene raised the flag on Tuesday to show that the gallery has reopened for the first time since the August 18 lockdown.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Diana Peneanene, visitor host to the Aigantighe Art Gallery, raised the flag on Tuesday to show that the gallery has reopened for the first time since the August 18 lockdown.

The Pottery Group was formed in 1966, and members purchased the property in White St in the 1970s, which is still used as a workroom by the club.

Over 70 works will be on display from the Embroiderers Guild, showcasing the patience and creativity of members.

The South Canterbury Pottery Group and Aoraki Broderers’ Guild exhibitions at the Aigantighe Art Gallery will run until October 18.


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10 must-see exhibitions at level 2 in September https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-at-level-2-in-september/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-at-level-2-in-september/ With Canterbury now on Alert Level 2, Warren Feeney looks forward to seeing the work of a local artist showcased at the Sydney Biennale in 2020, as well as an artist exhibiting in Christchurch for the first time after 40 years of painting. He is also impressed with the region’s commitment to textiles and crafts. […]]]>

With Canterbury now on Alert Level 2, Warren Feeney looks forward to seeing the work of a local artist showcased at the Sydney Biennale in 2020, as well as an artist exhibiting in Christchurch for the first time after 40 years of painting. He is also impressed with the region’s commitment to textiles and crafts.

Kulimoe'anga Stone Maka, Kuini Haati 2 (Two Queen Heart) and Toga mo Bolata'ane (Tonga and Great Britain), 2008-10.  Oil, clay, dye on tapa canvas.  Installation view, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu.  Courtesy of the artist.  Photography: John Collie

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Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, Kuini Haati 2 (Two Queen Heart) and Toga mo Bolata’ane (Tonga and Great Britain), 2008-10. Oil, clay, dye on tapa canvas. Installation view, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu. Courtesy of the artist. Photography: John Collie

1. Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka: Toga mo Bolata ‘ane, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, corner of Worcester Blvd and Montreal St.

Tongan / Christchurch artist Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka was one of six artists representing Aotearoa at the Sydney Biennale in 2020. Biennale curator Brook Andrew visited Maka in early 2020, selecting two ngatu’uli paintings ( blackened tapa fabric): Toga mo Bolata’ane (Tonga and Great Britain), 2008 – 2010 and Kuini Haati 2 (Two Queen Hearts), 2008. And now, the people of Christchurch can finally experience the powerful works of the Maka Biennale and their childhood memories of Tonga and Britain. September 11 – January 16, 2022

Andy Leleisi'uao, Umbilical Brown III, 2021, acrylic on canvas (PGgallery192)

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Andy Leleisi’uao, Umbilical Brown III, 2021, acrylic on canvas (PGgallery192)

2. Spring Selection, PGgallery192, 192 Bealey Ave.

Spring Selection brings together works by established and emerging New Zealand artists, from Philippa Blair and Ralph Hotere to Andy Leleisi’uao, including Rebecca Harris and Vivienne Murchison. Among the many highlights is that of Leleisi’uao Umbilical III, a recent work as political as it is elegant and confronting, its babies in free fall, encircling letters of the Samoan alphabet. Leleisi’uao observes, “lose the language, lose the culture”. From September 8 to 24.

Elizabeth Thomson, The Sleeping Giant, Dusky Canyon, 2019 glass spheres, optically transparent epoxy resin, water-based insulation, cast vinyl, lacquer on profiled and shaped wood panel.  Image courtesy of the artist and the Central Gallery.  (Ashburton Art Gallery)

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Elizabeth Thomson, The Sleeping Giant, Dusky Canyon, 2019 glass spheres, optically transparent epoxy resin, water-based insulation, cast vinyl, lacquer on profiled and shaped wood panel. Image courtesy of the artist and the Central Gallery. (Ashburton Art Gallery)

3. Elizabeth Thomson, Cellular Memory, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

Organized by writer / artist Gregory O’Brien, Cellular memory is a traveling exhibition encompassing three decades of Elizabeth Thomson’s artistic practice. It is a magnificent exhibition. Ashburton Art Gallery adds fire to its magic with a new series of works by the artist, Lateral theories. O’Brien describes it as “conceptually and in terms of its materials … moving into uncharted, hitherto unimaginable territory”. August 14 – October 24.

Philip Beadle, Carlton Mill, 2020, oil on canvas board (Art box)

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Philip Beadle, Carlton Mill, 2020, oil on canvas board (Art box)

4. Ten by tens. A decade at Art Box, 1/16 Loftus St, Papanui.

Opened as a studio for artist Beverley Frost in 2004, Art Box gained a new identity after the earthquakes of 2011 as an exhibition gallery of local artists. Art Box was one of the first galleries to open after the earthquake and Ten by tens celebrates its tenth anniversary in a group show, featuring numerous artists, including Philip Beadle, Ruth Killoran and Melanie Hammet. All works measure ‘ten by ten inches’ (25x25cm). Opening September 12.

Zina Swanson, Pine Eyes, 2021, acrylic and gesso on linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Zina Swanson, Pine Eyes, 2021, acrylic and gesso on linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

5. Zina Swanson, Strange Pomander, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan St, Sydenham.

In Strange pomander, Zina Swanson draws our attention to how we tame the natural world as if it were one of our own. Strange pomander (a scented herb ball used to ward off “unpleasant” smells) serves as a metaphor for such relationships, reframing the subjects of her work as objects, serving as windows to look through, as exquisite as foreign in a country strange. September 9 – October 2.

Marilyn Hopkins, Quilt, 2020 (Stoddart Cottage)

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Marilyn Hopkins, Quilt, 2020 (Stoddart Cottage)

6. Bays Harbor Quilting Group, Spring Quilting Collection, Stoddart Cottage Gallery, 2 Waipapa Ave, Diamond Harbor.

English artist and writer Grayson Perry forever changed perceptions of quilting thanks to his passion for large-scale tapestries, publicly stressing that art is not defined by what or how it is made, but by its context. The Bays Harbor Quilting Group is in good company, with their Spring Quilting collection showcasing artwork that could be for the wall or the bed. In addition, there are notebooks covered with fabric, bags, cushions, teapots and soft toys. September 10-26.

Nick Harte, Maimed Infant, 2021, acrylic on canvas (City Art Depot)

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Nick Harte, Maimed Infant, 2021, acrylic on canvas (City Art Depot)

7. Nick Harte, Demonology, 96 Disraeli St, Sydenham.

Painter, writer and musician Nick Harte currently performs with the Aotearoa Snuff Jazz Ensemble and holds his first solo exhibition at City Art. His mention of demons and spirits may be present in the titles of his works, but his painting also inhabits another universe, more nebulous, but no less convincing. A reassuring world in its promises of wonder and beauty that is repeated over and over again. September 14 – October 4.

Karl Fritsch, Ring, 2021. Silver, aquamarine.  (The National)

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Karl Fritsch, Ring, 2021. Silver, aquamarine. (The National)

8. Karl Fritsch and Moniek Schrijer, SchmucKCrackeR, The National, 249, avenue Moorhouse.

SchmucKCrackeR showcases contemporary jewelry and items that include new works created by two Wellington-based artists. Moniek Schrijer is the recent artists resident at McCahon House and is internationally recognized for “turning the ordinary into the extraordinary”. Karl Fritsch works from his Driving Creek Pottery residence. September 9 – October 2.

John Walsh, Just Before They Came, 2019, oil on canvas (The Central Art Gallery)

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John Walsh, Just Before They Came, 2019, oil on canvas (The Central Art Gallery)

9. John Walsh, Things Have Changed, The Central Art Gallery, 2 Worcester Blvd, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora.

that of John Walsh Things have changed is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Christchurch and after 40 years of painting. Born in 1954 in Tolaga Bay, Walsh is of Irish Aitanga, Haitian and New Zealand descent. In part, he can be credited with re-establishing the landscape as an important subject for the visual arts, his painting invigorating it and connecting it intimately with Maori conceptions of time and place, past and present. September 18 to October 10.

Barbara King, Under the Sea, felted wool and silk fabrics (Eastside Gallery)

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Barbara King, Under the Sea, felted wool and silk fabrics (Eastside Gallery)

ten. Textile and Fiber Arts Network, Textile Treasures, Eastside Gallery, 338 Worcester St, Linwood.

Textile treasures is a group exhibition by six local artists working through a range of practices; fashion, felting, embroidery, quilting, knitting and recycled furniture and more. The Textile and Fiber Arts Network, TAFAN, was formed following the February 2011 earthquakes and the loss of premises by a number of textile groups, now sharing facilities and collectively defending textiles, l fiber art and craftsmanship. September 20 – October 9.


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Bridgeport Housatonic Museum of Art reopens with big celebration of group shows https://marlborough-monaco.com/bridgeport-housatonic-museum-of-art-reopens-with-big-celebration-of-group-shows/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/bridgeport-housatonic-museum-of-art-reopens-with-big-celebration-of-group-shows/ BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut, (WTNH) – The Housatonic Museum of Art in Bridgeport announced its reopening on Thursday, September 9, with a celebration of its major group show. The Big Art Bash 2021 show will feature four very diverse individual exhibitions, hoping to affect even the most discerning art lovers. It will be located at Lafayette Hall […]]]>

BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut, (WTNH) – The Housatonic Museum of Art in Bridgeport announced its reopening on Thursday, September 9, with a celebration of its major group show.

The Big Art Bash 2021 show will feature four very diverse individual exhibitions, hoping to affect even the most discerning art lovers. It will be located at Lafayette Hall on the Housatonic Community College campus.

“The range of topics presented by these four exhibitions is wide-ranging, however, they all examine key aspects of human existence: connection, societal structures, despair and hope,” said Robbin Zella, director of the Housatonic Museum of Art. “Whether you are moved by Jon Schueler’s ability to speak out to relieve PTSD, or offended by the effect that patriarchal structures have had on women, this collective working assembly is very emotional.

Jon Schueler’s exhibition features a selection of war-themed paintings that simultaneously reflect the horrors Schueler witnessed as a B-17 navigator and the beauty of nature he saw while flying. HMA says the abstract expressionist’s writings associated with the works provide insight into his traumatic experience. A conference will be held virtually on October 7 at 6 p.m. and will be visible until October 8.

New dynamic interwoven sculptures by South Korean artist Jongil Ma will also be featured in the exhibition. The commissioned work titled “Be There When You Return” was funded by Elizabeth Fray, the Werth Family Foundation and HCC. HMA says the work references the Bridgeport journey and the hopeful return of residents’ pride and passion for local architecture. HMA also hopes this will welcome students and the community to the campus as a permanent facility.

There will be a mini solo exhibition featuring a series of meditation offerings on modern physics, space, human relations and music from Westport resident and Taiwanese artist Erik Chiang. HMA describes the show as an examination of the meaning of our existence and the importance of connecting to one. The sho is part of the HCC STEAMFest celebration.

A selection of paintings, photographs and sculptures includes an exhibition that explores the ways in which male domination has established a stronghold in family, social, legal, political, religious and economic systems. “Of Woman Born” examines the patriarchal structures that have dominated, oppressed and exploited women through the ages. The works in this exhibition feature artists from Fairfield County, Ridgefield, Westport and Fairfield.

The HMA requires that visitors comply with social distancing rules and must wear protective masks. To see HMA COVID-19 updates and exhibition dates, go to their website, www.HousatonicMuseum.org.


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New exhibitions to celebrate heritage trades, Petone’s woolen stories https://marlborough-monaco.com/new-exhibitions-to-celebrate-heritage-trades-petones-woolen-stories/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/new-exhibitions-to-celebrate-heritage-trades-petones-woolen-stories/ If after weeks of watching British Olympic diver Tom Daley knitting in the stands in Tokyo, you’ve jumped in line to panic and order some needles yourself, don’t worry. It turns out that taking up a trade is a completely normal side effect of the pandemic. The healing powers of picking up an old profession […]]]>

If after weeks of watching British Olympic diver Tom Daley knitting in the stands in Tokyo, you’ve jumped in line to panic and order some needles yourself, don’t worry. It turns out that taking up a trade is a completely normal side effect of the pandemic.

The healing powers of picking up an old profession or exploring a new one have been hailed by experts as an effective way to manage stress related to Covid.

“When you see the progress, you feel like you haven’t wasted your time,” said freelance writer and art designer Dr Bronwyn Lloyd. who was recently announced as curator two new craft exhibits to be presented at the Petone Settlers Museum in Lower Hutt next year.

“The wool itself has a huge appeal to people, especially in New Zealand,” Lloyd said. “The revival of craftsmanship is incredible.

Dr Bronwyn Lloyd was recently announced as Blumhardt Curator 2021.

Ricky Wilson / Stuff

Dr Bronwyn Lloyd was recently announced as Blumhardt Curator 2021.

READ MORE:
* Artistic group rewarding young talents after 46 years
* Cambridge sewn by smart people
* Do you remember the Happiness Club?
* Original features of the Petone Settlers Museum discovered during the upgrade

Lloyd’s appointment as curator came from a new program developed by the Blumhardt Foundation which is hosted by the Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt, which has chosen Lloyd as its curator, and the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui, who selected Milly Mitchell-Aynon.

The Blumhardt Foundation is a charitable organization that focuses on the advancement of the craft and object art sectors.

With a mission to develop an exhibit that would add to the discourse on craftsmanship and the practice of objects in Aotearoa, Lloyd knew she wanted to address the ongoing revival of heritage craft forms.

Many people have chosen knitting and crochet as a hobby during lockdown.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Many people have chosen knitting and crochet as a hobby during lockdown.

“What’s strange is that we are the last group of people to learn these skills when our mothers were young,” Lloyd said. “We took sewing and cooking classes at school, but that faded over time. Many of these skills have been lost.

The recent revival of interest in knitting and crochet partly explained by the pandemic. A study in the British Journal of Occupational Therapy 2013 have discovered that knitting has a link with well-being. Researchers have found a significant relationship between the frequency of knitting and feelings of happiness and calm.

Lloyd hopes that the exhibitions she is preparing will give the craft-loving crowds the opportunity to explore contemporary techniques, which is the subject of her first exhibition, as well as the local history of art forms. of Lower Hutt, which is the subject of the second.

Tom Daley of Great Britain knits as he watches the women's 3m springboard final on day nine of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Tokyo Aquatic Center.

Clive Rose / Getty Images

Tom Daley of Great Britain knits as he watches the women’s 3m springboard final on day nine of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Tokyo Aquatic Center.

Lloyd’s exhibition ideas were inspired by his discovery of a heirloom blanket made by Stansborough Mill as a fundraiser for Women’s Refuge.

The limited edition cover, titled The story repeats itself, refers to the blankets offered by the staff of the Petone wool mill to families in need during the 1918 flu epidemic. The woolen mill was located in Petone for 80 years until it closed in 1968.

“The coverage of Stansborough is a testament to the need for the same kind of generosity in the midst of yet another global pandemic,” Lloyd said.

He also told the overall story; from the origins of wool craftsmanship at home, to the industrial manufacture of wool, to the renewal of artisanal and heritage wool craftsmanship in 2021.

The exhibits will be on display at the Petone Settlers Museum in Lower Hutt next year.

Robert Kitchin / Tips

The exhibits will be on display at the Petone Settlers Museum in Lower Hutt next year.

“I hope the exhibits will attract people,” Lloyd said. “It will appeal to people who want to learn how to do things … but also to people who have historical connections and who want to come and see pictures. [of the mill and its staff]. “

In addition to archival photographs, Lloyd will incorporate audio elements of oral history, physical objects and textile samples produced by the factory for the heritage display. The contemporary exhibition would present new works by seven artisan artists at the “top of their field”.

These artists are Vita Cochran, Steven Park, Lizzy Leckie, Caroline McQuarrie, Rona Ngahuia Osborne, Daegan Wells and Georgina May Young.

The Petone Settlers Museum is free and open Wednesday through Sunday in winter and daily in summer, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


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10 Canterbury Exhibitions You Must See In August https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-canterbury-exhibitions-you-must-see-in-august/ Sat, 31 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-canterbury-exhibitions-you-must-see-in-august/ In the highlights of the August exhibit, Warren Feeney recommends We stand here, an exhibition that asks important questions about Ōtautahi Christchurch: who lives here, what is our cultural makeup and what is important to us? An artist-run space in the city center ends on a positive note, and an exhibit of painting on unexpected […]]]>

In the highlights of the August exhibit, Warren Feeney recommends We stand here, an exhibition that asks important questions about Ōtautahi Christchurch: who lives here, what is our cultural makeup and what is important to us? An artist-run space in the city center ends on a positive note, and an exhibit of painting on unexpected surfaces includes (among other items) a light switch and a plastic bottle.

1. Hellzapoppin ‘! The art of the flying nun, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū. Corner Worcester Blvd and Montreal St. It’s been 40 years since local record store manager Roger Shepherd started Flying Nun. Now internationally acclaimed for his contribution to garage / post-punk music, Hellzapoppin ‘! The art of the flying nun celebrates the inseparable relationship between music and its art: Flying Nun bands, musicians, artists and designers, defining the look and attitude of the record label’s singles, albums, posters and videos. August 21 to November 28.

Tim Cheeseborough, Sky High Scaffolders, 2021 (Galerie Stoddart Cottage)

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Tim Cheeseborough, Sky High Scaffolders, 2021 (Galerie Stoddart Cottage)

2. Diamond Harbor Camera Club, rebuild refocused, Stoddart Cottage Gallery, 2 Waipapa Ave, Diamond Harbor. Rebuild refocused is an annual excursion and exhibit by members of the Diamond Harbor Camera Club, documenting the evolving state of Ōtautahi architecture (historic and contemporary) and its community spaces. Among this year’s photographs is that of Tim Cheeseborough Sky High Scaffolding, an image that reveals the potential of the camera to record both the certainties and the unrealities of everyday life. August 6-29.

Donna-Marie Patterson, Illusion of Knowledge, Based on Science, 2021 (Chambers Gallery)

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Donna-Marie Patterson, Illusion of Knowledge, Based on Science, 2021 (Chambers Gallery)

3. Donna-Marie Patterson, overcooked, until the bubble bursts! Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham St, Sydenham. Sculptor and installation artist Donna-Marie Patterson also creates works on paper that seem to go beyond even artist Paul Klee’s claim that drawing is “taking a line for a walk.” Patterson’s drawings are puzzling visual mazes, worked in ink and oil on paper. These are his favorite materials and also the subject of his work, exhilarating and questioning our relationship to the materials of the earth. August 18 – September 4.

READ MORE:
* 10 must-see exhibitions in July
* 10 must-see exhibitions in November
* 10 must-see exhibitions in April in Christchurch

Janneth Gil, Brighton Mall, 2016 (Tūranga)

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Janneth Gil, Brighton Mall, 2016 (Tūranga)

4. We Are Here: Celebrating Five Years of the Christchurch Documentary Project. Tūranga, 60 Cathedral Square. A collaboration between Canterbury University School of Fine Arts and Christchurch Libraries, We are here documents in photographs five local communities between 2015 and 2019: Bishopdale, City Center, The East, Halswell and Woolston. The brief for the students was to answer the questions: Who lives in Christchurch and is part of our community? What is our cultural and social makeup? What is important to the people in each region? For answers and more, visit We are here. Until September 27.

Takaaki Sakaguchi, Ned Kelly, 2021, ceramics and enamels (Form Gallery)

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Takaaki Sakaguchi, Ned Kelly, 2021, ceramics and enamels (Form Gallery)

5. Revisions – Andrew Carran and Takaaki Sakaguchi, Form Gallery, 468 Colombo St, Sydenham. Ceramic artist Andrew Carran is well known nationally for his Shino enamels, and Takaaki Sakaguchi is an internationally renowned fashion designer turned ceramic artist. Sakaguchi has been working with clay since 2017, his work referring to Western and Japanese art. In Revisions he salutes the Ned Kelly series by Sydney Nolan and Kyureki, a series of 12 ceramics representing the Japanese calendar. August 7-28.

Julian Hooper, Zagnut, 2019, plywood, stud and acrylic.  Photograph by Sam Hartnett.  (Marshy)

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Julian Hooper, Zagnut, 2019, plywood, stud and acrylic. Photograph by Sam Hartnett. (Marshy)

6. Julian Hooper, Paludal, 5/2 Papanui Rd, Thursday-Fri 5:30 p.m.-7: 30 p.m., Sat 12 p.m.-3 p.m. Auckland artist Julian Hooper is organizing his first exhibition in Ōtautahi. Exhibiting from the late 1990s, Hooper’s painting and sculpture are inspired by a history of European modernism, its imagery and its methodologies, refined and paired, not to go to the essence of their subjects, but rather to reveal their evasive personalities. Both visual puzzles and beautiful objects, it’s hard to resist Hooper’s art. August 6-28.

Sefton Rani, The Low Is Greater Than The High, 2021, paintings and mixed media, (PGgallery192)

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Sefton Rani, The Low Is Greater Than The High, 2021, paintings and mixed media, (PGgallery192)

7. Sefton Rani, Silence is the flower, PGgallery192, 192 Bealey Ave. Painting in the 21st Century is an ever-changing creature and Auckland / Cook Islands based artist Sefton Rani Silence is the flower is a wonderful experience of painting on unexpected surfaces and objects. Paint skins dried on mixed media including corrugated iron, switch and plastic bottle. Rani’s collage works fall somewhere between painting and sculpture in an artistic practice that also deals with Polynesian immigrant culture, family histories, and the opulence and vibe of industrial painting. Until August 20.

Sam Harrison, Untitled charcoal III (inside out), charcoal on paper, 2021 (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Sam Harrison, Untitled charcoal III (inside out), charcoal on paper, 2021 (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

8. Sam Harrison, Upside Down, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham. Since his first exhibition, sculptor / printmaker Sam Harrison’s art has focused on the human figure, so there is an element of surprise in the pure abstract images in Upside down. An exhibition of charcoals, recessed and residing on paper surfaces, addressed to the interested gallery visitor. Upside down talks a lot about Harrison’s art, emphasizing his authority over materials, his presence remaining unmistakable. Until August 21.

Tiffany Thornley, Frida, intaglio print (Eastside Gallery)

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Tiffany Thornley, Frida, intaglio print (Eastside Gallery)

9. Tiffany Thornley, Robyn Webster and Jane Zusters, Dredging. A new story. Engraving of three women. Eastside Gallery, Linwood. Tiffany Thornley and Jane Zusters are seasoned printmakers, both artists also featured in Aotearoa’s first investigative publication of Women Artists: A picture book for women 25 women artists from Aotearoa in 1988. Dredging. A new story. Engraving of three women sees them more aligned in 2021 with printmaker Robyn Webster, all three aware of printmaking as a discipline on contemporary society politics, communication and change. August 9-28.

Claudia Kogachi, Untitled (Prun), 2021, acrylic on canvas, (Hot lunch)

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Claudia Kogachi, Untitled (Prun), 2021, acrylic on canvas, (Hot lunch)

ten. Claudia Kogachi hot girls with IBS, Hot Lunch, 227 High St. Hot Lunch is closing. The artist-run space was opened in August 2020 by graduate students from the Islam School of Fine Arts, Millie Galbraith, Liam Krijgsman and Lee Richardson. His stay in the city center seems short, and he will be missed, his exhibition program characterized by his wisdom and humor, and Hot Lunch ends on a positive note, with Auckland artist Claudia Kogachi, Hot girls with IBS, the uncomfortable assurances of his life in his paintings a perfect ending. August 6-21.


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10 must-see exhibitions in July https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-july/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-july/ In July’s list of the best exhibitions in Canterbury, Warren Feeney recommends Graham Bennett AXIS + AXES as a must-see treasure, discovers that a disaster is more than an act of nature or a choice of God, and that after a ten-year absence, senior painter and printmaker Stanley Palmer is back to exhibit at the […]]]>

In July’s list of the best exhibitions in Canterbury, Warren Feeney recommends Graham Bennett AXIS + AXES as a must-see treasure, discovers that a disaster is more than an act of nature or a choice of God, and that after a ten-year absence, senior painter and printmaker Stanley Palmer is back to exhibit at the Center of arts Te Matatiki Toi Ora.

1. Graham Bennett, AXIS + AXES, Canterbury Museum, Rolleston Avenue:

AXIS + AXES is an exhibition-inquiry into the artistic practice of sculptor / printmaker Graham Bennett, revealing unseen studio work completed and in progress. Along with Bennett’s access to the Museum’s Pacific collection and influence on his work, the exhibit also features ceremonial paddles, clubs and adzes, their persuasive and confrontational presence, raising awareness of the complex and unresolved conversations between indigenous and colonial histories, past and present, making AXIS + AXES an inescapable treasure of an exhibition on several levels. Until October 25.

Estefania Mondaca - And there were the others who came from the flesh.  2018, oil and charcoal on paper (Art Hole)

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Estefania Mondaca – And there were the others who came from the flesh. 2018, oil and charcoal on paper (Art Hole)

2. Estefania Mondaca and Nanenko Olmos, Another View, Art Hole, 336 St Asaph St:

Recent immigrants from Latin America, the paintings of Estefania Mondaca and Nanenko Olmos in Another view offer alternative and different perspectives on the house. Their subjects, humans and animals, inhabit and seek solace in a suburban world to which they seem as accustomed as they are disconnected. They document familiar domestic spaces that somehow refuse to welcome our presence. July 6-10.

John Wishart, Ocean Beach Series, 2018, plaster and sisal, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

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John Wishart, Ocean Beach Series, 2018, plaster and sisal, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

3. John Wishart, Abandoned Works, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St:

Southland sculptor John Wishart’s Abandoned works encompasses the dilemma of an artist doing work that is hardly ever finished, and also recognizes the workers of Ocean Beach Freezing Works, its closure in 1991 and the loss of 1,450 jobs. Wishart describes his sculptures in Abandoned works as possessing an “in-between”, the ocean transforming and revealing the “uncertain beauty” of the vestiges of industry. Until July 23.

Matt Hunt, Circuit Board Hell, oil on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Matt Hunt, Circuit Board Hell, oil on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

4. Eugene Huston, The song remains the same. Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham:

Guest curator at the Jonathan Smart Gallery, Eugene Huston brings together a selection of works that consider the idea of ​​”catastrophe” in its broadest context, more than an act of nature or a choice of God, but fundamental to it. human condition. At the heart of The song stays the same is the power of Armageddon as a subject open to all imaginary possibilities, circumstances, behaviors and realities. Until July 17th.

The anatomy of Whorus nocturnus.  Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center.

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The anatomy of Whorus nocturnus. Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center.

5. Aotearoa sex workers. A day in the life of. Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, 2 Worcester Blvd:

Now in its third year, A day in the life of is a traveling exhibition of works of art by sex workers that impart information and knowledge about life in the industry. It aims to change perceptions about female sex workers as portrayed in mainstream media and popular culture and, as an art exhibition in a gallery, deals with the enduring presence of the male gaze. July 6-18.

John Badcock, AM 19.2.21, oil on cardboard (Susan Badcock Studio)

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John Badcock, AM 19.2.21, oil on cardboard (Susan Badcock Studio)

6. John and Susan Badcock, Foraging, Susan Badcock Studio, 47 Talbot Street, Geraldine:

John Badcock’s Impressionist paintings and Susan Badcock’s hand-colored photographs constitute a group exhibition of two artists sharing familiar territory in attitude and subject matter. In Foraging, the two artists participate in the act of researching, bringing together and revealing the light, flora and fauna of the region and of the house they know so well. July 4-25.

Stanley Palmer Study for Above Ohauroro - Whangaroa, 2021 Oil on linen canvas and ACM panel (The Central Art Gallery)

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Stanley Palmer Study for Above Ohauroro – Whangaroa, 2021 Oil on linen canvas and ACM panel (The Central Art Gallery)

7. Stanley Palmer, The Central Art Gallery, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora, 2 Worcester Blvd:

The painter and printmaker Stanley Palmer returns to the Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, after having previously exhibited in the southern quadrant of the Gingko / Salamander Gallery (1980-2011), which has now disappeared. Palmer’s return is welcome news, with his exhibition of new paintings providing an opportunity to experience his finely tuned response to many conversations about the land, roads, hills, and surroundings of Aotearoa. Until July 25.

Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, 2021 (The National)

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Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, 2021 (The National)

8. Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, Le National, 249 avenue Moorhouse:

Lecturer at the School of Fine Arts of Ilam and award-winning book designer Aaron Beehre The Venetians is a series of large injected prints and one-prints masters in risography, their subjects, framed in a dramatic and evocative light of Caravaggio against the dark. From a historical and dramatic point of view, Beehre’s subjects are “Venetians”, ever changing and capricious. Until July 17

Fiona Connor, Untitled (letterbox) # 1- # 8 (installation view, Light enough to read from here), 2021. Image: Janneth Gil.  (The physics room)

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Fiona Connor, Untitled (letterbox) # 1- # 8 (installation view, Light enough to read from here), 2021. Image: Janneth Gil. (The physics room)

9. Fiona Connor, Lucy Skaer, Rachel Shearer and Cathy Livermore, Light enough to read, The Physics Room, 301 rue Montréal:

The physics room has reopened its library. Last seen when his gallery was located at 49-59 Worcester Blvd, the library’s restoration also comes with Light enough to read, an exhibition on writing as a means of communication beyond words. Artist Fiona Connor responds, orchestrating exchanges on form, volume, mass and surfaces, connecting and contrasting objects on the floor and walls of the gallery. Until July 25.

Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, 2021. Installation view at the CoCA Center of Contemporary Art Toi Moroki.  Image: John Collie Courtesy of CoCA

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Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, 2021. Installation view at the CoCA Center of Contemporary Art Toi Moroki. Image: John Collie Courtesy of CoCA

10. Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, CoCA Toi Moroki, 66 Gloucester St:

Installation by multimedia artist Nathan Pōhio and sound artist Luke Shaw The mist and the horizon presents an act of separation and reconciliation, a not insignificant task in the convoluted spaces of the north gallery of the CoCA. Citing a creation story Ngāi Tahu, Pohio’s light installation, moderate yet complete in its expanse of North Gallery spaces, is complemented by Shaw’s sound work, bringing together a resonance of country music duets, sharing a note of undulating fa to the organ and establishing a and a persistent presence throughout the space of the gallery. Until August 28.


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Te Hīkoi Toi: From darkness to light – exhibitions welcome Matariki https://marlborough-monaco.com/te-hikoi-toi-from-darkness-to-light-exhibitions-welcome-matariki/ Sat, 26 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/te-hikoi-toi-from-darkness-to-light-exhibitions-welcome-matariki/ supplied / Neil Prize Whakahoki by Keri-Mei Zagrobelna in the Courtenay Place Lightboxes. The Pūanga and Matariki stars rising in our sky at this time mark the passage of one year i te ao Māori. They help us understand seasonal change, but it’s more complex than that. With each phase of the moon in the […]]]>
Whakahoki by Keri-Mei Zagrobelna in the Courtenay Place Lightboxes.

supplied / Neil Prize

Whakahoki by Keri-Mei Zagrobelna in the Courtenay Place Lightboxes.

The Pūanga and Matariki stars rising in our sky at this time mark the passage of one year i te ao Māori. They help us understand seasonal change, but it’s more complex than that. With each phase of the moon in the maramataka, the lunar calendar, there is another layer of understanding of what is celebrated, why and how.

The date of the Matariki celebration changes every year as it is based on the position of the moon when the stars reappear. Each phase of the moon reflects the changes in the elements of nature, and these in turn reflect the changes that are occurring in the spirit world and the emotional and physical demands of us through this period of Hine Takurua, our days. the darkest. They remind us to look up, to seek the light of the night sky. Remembering what we have lost and who we have lost, wishing for what we hope will happen.

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As night smeared the sky around me and the rain sewed its embroidery on my coat, I made my way to the Te Aro light boxes in Courtenay Place. Pūtātara announced the new work of mana whenua artist Keri-Mei Zagrobelna (Te Ati Awa).

Whakahoki by Keri-Mei Zagrobelna in the Courtenay Place Lightboxes.

Arihia Latham / Stuff

Whakahoki by Keri-Mei Zagrobelna in the Courtenay Place Lightboxes.

Whakahoki is a layered work of jewelry photographs made by Zagrobelna based on 16 of the 30 phases of the maramataka moon. Each picture tells a story: one in the shape of a shark’s tooth, another of golden lips resting on clay, another a glass vessel with a woven gold binding and a kumara growing out of it. interior. Some are worn by models embodying atua, like ethereal presences. All are photographed by Norm Heke and curated by Awhina Tamarapa.

The result is breathtaking. Zagrobelna says the process of making the work was incredibly grounded in the extent that she incorporated her understanding of maramataka into her practice, honoring productive days for hard work and low energy phases as days of rest.

She says that despite the challenge of living in a fast-paced society based on the Gregorian calendar, it seemed important for gaining a deeper understanding of maramataka and a connection to one’s ancestors.

I walked out of this connection celebration to watch UPU at the Circa Theater, curated by Grace Iwashita-Taylor and directed by Fasitua Amosa as part of the Kia Mau Festival. It was an incredible 70 minute immersion in the poetry of Te-Moana-nui-a-Kiwa. It felt like an acknowledgment of the pain of the past with a celebration of who we are and the hopes for the future that come with every writer, actor, and audience member. It was like a change in poetry as it was in theater, I came out inspired and grateful.

Turumeke Harrington's bright patchwork tunnel,

Arihia Latham / Supplied

Turumeke Harrington’s bright patchwork tunnel, “Longer Than I Can Remember”, mimics birth and takes us in and out of Crossings at the Adam Art Gallery. Please note, the gallery is temporarily closed under Covid level 2 alert.

My hīkoi had appropriately started in the dark and moved towards the light. The morning took me to the Elfi Spiewack jewelry show Deeper at the Avid Gallery on Victoria St. His work was directed to that of Zagrobelna with sheep bone and silver materials, and carved designs – both original and familiar in nature. Despite the use of similar materials, his art is fresh and firm in its own German roots, touching on influences here in Aotearoa with a natural form while avoiding the appropriation of other bony or native images. The work has a lightness, but also a memory shaped from the depths of our bones.

The new collective exhibition of the Adam art gallery Crossings builds on the experiences of artists over the past year. He explores intimacies and distances, and the collective pause that has catalyzed many existential observations. “The confinements,” writes curator Christina Barton, “were a time to reflect, to withdraw into oneself, to become aware of the inner worlds of our mind, our body, our homes, our country; when the hustle and bustle of modern life has momentarily ceased ”.

From James Tapsell-Kururangi’s personal diary and a photograph of a year spent in his grandmother’s residential unit in Rotorua, to a video of a 13 refugee dinghy adrift in the Mediterranean Sea by Next Spring Collective, the works grapple with difficult and diverse reflections on life.

This maintenance of memory results in the presentation of the work of artists also past. The incredible book of works by Vivian Lynn Threshold, with a skin-like paint that resembles a scarring, is an exploration of non-binary physicality. Grant Lingard swan song is devastating in her domestic service – laundry racks with crisp laundry show the loss of many people to HIV.

Rozanna Lee has a work on textiles and moving image which is a meditation on displacement, migration and connection to her ancestors through the art of batik. The luminous patchwork tunnel by Turumeke Harrington (Kati Mamoe, Kāi Tahu) Longer than I can remember imitates birth and takes us in and out of the exhibition, from the dark interior of the gallery to the light at the end of the tunnel.

This transformation sums up my hīkoi this week: from the dark internal spaces of memory and loss to the brightly colored possibility of our future. Hold on, see some good art. We will do it together.

  • Whakahoki Te Aro light boxes, Place Courtenay, until September 26.
  • Deeper, at the Avid Gallery, until July 10.
  • Crossings at the Adam Art Gallery, until August 22. (Under the Covid-19 Level 2 Alert, the Adam Art Gallery is temporarily closed until further notice.)


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Art exhibitions on aristocratic estates that are worth seeing https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-exhibitions-on-aristocratic-estates-that-are-worth-seeing/ Tue, 08 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-exhibitions-on-aristocratic-estates-that-are-worth-seeing/ With the easing of lockdown restrictions and summer just around the corner, the art world is finally back on its feet. In addition to galleries and museums, many of the UK’s most magnificent estates are now open to the public again – with new art installations must-see. Perfect for a cultural day trip, we’ve handpicked […]]]>

With the easing of lockdown restrictions and summer just around the corner, the art world is finally back on its feet. In addition to galleries and museums, many of the UK’s most magnificent estates are now open to the public again – with new art installations must-see.

Perfect for a cultural day trip, we’ve handpicked five of the best exhibits on display this summer at properties ranging from the gothic Mount Stuart House to the majestic Blenheim Palace.

Cecil Beaton at Blenheim Palace

The Ninth Duke of Marlborough and his second wife, American intellectual Gladys Deacon, were enthusiastic hosts for the roughly seven years they lived at Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire in the 1920s.

Moving to the magnificent stately home after their marriage in 1921, the Duke left seven years later and expelled his wife two years later. However, during their brief stay Cecil Beaton was a regular visitor and returned frequently as a guest of subsequent dukes. Today he is invited again – posthumously – as an exhibition of his celebrity portraits runs through July 4.

Beaton’s portraits represent top notch celebrities: Barbra Streisand, Twiggy, Coco Chanel, Andy Warhol. Hollywood stars include Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe and Audrey Hepburn. The oldest is that of Stephen Tennant disguised as Prince Charming, taken in 1927; the latest by American sculptor Louise Nevelson dates from 1978. Beaton died two years later.

Here in Blenheim – a gift from Queen Anne to John Churchill for winning England’s victory in a series of battles, including that of Blenheim in 1704 – they hang surrounded by paintings of the aristocracy. There’s the Fourth Duke and His Family by Joshua Reynolds in the Red Room; Becker’s Mary, 10th Duchess of Marlborough in the Great Hall; even a pastel drawing of Gladys Deacon by Beaton himself in the Grand Cabinet of State Rooms. Beside them, Beaton’s rich black-and-white photographs tell equal stories of fame, glamor, and power.

Until July 4th. Blenheim Palace, Woodstock OX20 1PP; blenheimpalace.com

Ai Weiwei at Blenheim Palace


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10 must-see exhibitions in Canterbury in June https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-canterbury-in-june/ Sat, 29 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-must-see-exhibitions-in-canterbury-in-june/ Warren Feeney The list of 10 recommended exhibitions in June includes three great reasons to visit Ralph Hotere face-to-face (resist), an installation that plays on window shopping and peepshows, and a ceramist who likes things thrown out, fallen into disgrace. 1. Ralph Hôtère, head (resist), Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, corner of Montreal […]]]>

Warren Feeney The list of 10 recommended exhibitions in June includes three great reasons to visit Ralph Hotere face-to-face (resist), an installation that plays on window shopping and peepshows, and a ceramist who likes things thrown out, fallen into disgrace.

1. Ralph Hôtère, head (resist), Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, corner of Montreal St and Worcester Blvd. There are many good reasons to visit head (resist), and here are three: Walk next to Hotere’s Godwit / Kuaka, 1977 and its 18 meters of constantly evolving animated colored surfaces. Be immersed in Black phoenix, 1984, The transformation by Hotere of the meteorological surfaces of a fishing trawler, commemorated and celebrated. Hotere’s and Bill Manhire’s TO SUPPORT, its corrugated iron and fluorescent tubes, shimmering dramatically in black and white. head (resist) is a “major investigation” and more. Until July 25.

For 10 must-see exhibitions in June: 2. Hannah Watkinson, Skate park or basketball court, Carters Beach, Westport, 2016, (CoCA Toi Moroki)

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For 10 must-see exhibitions in June: 2. Hannah Watkinson, Skate park or basketball court, Carters Beach, Westport, 2016, (CoCA Toi Moroki)

2. Hannah Watkinson, The near future. CoCA Toi Moroki, 66 Gloucester Street The near future is an investigative exhibition of Hannah Watkinson’s photographs of the past 10 years, documenting and reflecting on the evolving state of Buller and Westland. Among the selection are memorable images from 2016, then exhibited in Watkinson’s pop-up gallery, In Situ Photo Project, off Hereford St. Their images and message in 2021 are even more revealing and urgent than their first meeting. June 12 – August 28.

Caitlin Clarke, Belly Full of Greenery, 2021, (installation), Hot Lunch

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Caitlin Clarke, Belly Full of Greenery, 2021, (installation), Hot Lunch

3. Caitlin Clarke, belly full of greenHot Lunch, 227 High St. Multidisciplinary artist Caitlin Clarke’s belly full of green deals with the physical reality of the home, taking floor tiles, wall joists, window frames and earthenware, assembling a vast wooden installation in the artist-run space, Hot Lunch. Clarke describes his selected materials as a ‘relearning of his ancestors’ (from the Brunner mine to Dartmoor), and green belly filling, an evocation of “landscapes” that she calls lost, recovered, highs, lows, damp and home. June 18-30.

Nigel Borell, Untitled 2, 2021, acrylic, ink and silk brocade on paper, (Arts in Oxford Gallery)

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Nigel Borell, Untitled 2, 2021, acrylic, ink and silk brocade on paper, (Arts in Oxford Gallery)

4. Nigel Borell, Haumanu Hauora. Arts in the Oxford Gallery, 72 Main St, Oxford. Auckland-based artist and curator Nigel Borell (Pirirakau, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi, Te Whakatōhea) is artist in residence at Oxford, developing new paintings and organizing wānanga (workshops) by invitation with Maori art practitioners to share the arts mātauranga you maori knowledge. He defines Haumanu Hauora as an “expression which speaks of health and well-being”, and as such, identifies the principles of its exhibition and its residency. June 24 – August 15.

Max Gimblett, Ulysse, 2021, acrylic, water-based format and 23 karat Rosanoble gold leaf on canvas, (Nadine Milne Gallery)

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Max Gimblett, Ulysse, 2021, acrylic, water-based format and 23 karat Rosanoble gold leaf on canvas, (Nadine Milne Gallery)

5. Max Gimblett, The magic kingdom, Nadine Milne Gallery, 47, rue Hereford The magic kingdom is an exhibition-investigation of 15 paintings, covering 40 years of Max Gimblett’s practice. It is a revealing and magnificent exhibition of the best features of the artist’s work, his attention to his intuitive sensitivity to color and the assured meeting of the gestures of abstract expressionism and sumi-e Japanese ink painting. Certainly, Gimblett’s temperate recklessness Ulysses, 2021 is a splendid work among many others. Until June 30.

Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, Alien Headstand, 2021, (installation image), The Den

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Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, Alien Headstand, 2021, (installation image), The Den

6. Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, The extraterrestrial pear tree, The Den, 181 High St. The extraterrestrial pear tree is a collaboration of Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin that prohibits public access to the gallery space of The Den. Its windows being obscured, the only right of access is to look through four peepholes to visualize the projected images, varying according to the subject and the speed of their rotation. McLaughin describes it as “a game of window shopping, historical erotic peepshows, and an interest in communication through digital images.” June 2-12.

Hannah Kidd, Chinese Rainbow Pots, 2021, ceramic, steel and pewter, (The Central Art Gallery)

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Hannah Kidd, Chinese Rainbow Pots, 2021, ceramic, steel and pewter, (The Central Art Gallery)

7. Group exhibition, Hi Auaha, The Central Art Gallery, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, 2 Worcester Blvd. Hine Auaha (warriors, create, shape) is a collective exhibition by the artist and curator of the Laura Gobbe gallery, bringing together an impressive program of 13 artists through a range of artistic practices: Kirstin Carlin, Emma Camden, Zara Dolan, Larisse Hall, Veronica Herber, Lonnie Hutchinson, Hannah Kidd, Miranda Parkes, Ann Robinson, Elizabeth Thomson and Fiona Van Oyen. Rich in his imagery and his attitude, Hine Auaha is more than the sum of its many facets. June 24 – July 25.

Andrea du Chatenier, Glomerate, 2020, ceramic (Le National)

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Andrea du Chatenier, Glomerate, 2020, ceramic (Le National)

8. Andréa du Chatenier, EIGENLEBEN, The National, 249 Moorhouse Ave. EIGENLEBEN is the first solo exhibition of ceramic artist Andrea du Chatenier in Ōtautahi after more than two decades of national and international renown. Winner of the Portage Ceramic Residency Award in 2017, du Chatenier dismantles perceptions of ceramic objects, her work lying somewhere “between pleasure and discomfort”. She comments that she likes things abandoned, fallen out of favor. “When I started working with clay… it seemed ripe for reinvention and reinterpretation. »From June 2 to 27.

Ann Shelton, The Woodswoman, Gorse (Ulex europaeus), 2017, archival pigment print, (The National)

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Ann Shelton, The Woodswoman, Gorse (Ulex europaeus), 2017, archival pigment print, (The National)

9. Anne Shelton, missionaries,Aigantighe Art Gallery, 49 Wai-iti Rd, Timaru. at Ann Shelton missionaries, started as an exhibition at Auckland’s Two Rooms gallery in 2018 and is now on tour. missionaries is a series of still life photographs of plants in spaces that are both familiar and enigmatic, and undoubtedly exquisite. Robinson’s attention to the materiality of his subjects and its modulation of light and form, also inviting reflection on plants and the politics of their history and broader issues of colonialism, nationalism and feminism . June 12 – August 15.

Jasmine Gonzalez and Elliot 'Askew' O'Donnell, Continuum 8, 2021, acrylic, spray paint, UV pigment, transparent gel medium on canvas, (Fiksate Gallery)

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Jasmine Gonzalez and Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell, Continuum 8, 2021, acrylic, spray paint, UV pigment, transparent gel medium on canvas, (Fiksate Gallery)

10. Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell and Jasmine Gonzalez, Continuum, Fiksate, 54 Hawdon Street, Sydenham. Auckland-born Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell is a street artist whose expansive public murals have made him an international name. His wife, Jasmine Gonzalez, born in the United States, has a history in fashion design and Continuum is their first post-Covid collaboration. Gonzalez’s photographs with Wellington dancer / poet Jahra Wasasala and O’Donnell’s mother florist Meghan Humphries are reconfigured into digital and analog painting techniques and images that appear as spontaneous as they are calculated and considered . June 4 – July 3.


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