Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 09:32:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 The top 5 exhibitions to see inside and outside London https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-5-exhibitions-to-see-inside-and-outside-london/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 09:32:15 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-5-exhibitions-to-see-inside-and-outside-london/ Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic chooses his top 5 favorite exhibitions to see inside and outside London. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more shows should check out its top fall exhibits where three remain open to visitors. How to live with psychosis? Luckily most […]]]>

Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic chooses his top 5 favorite exhibitions to see inside and outside London. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more shows should check out its top fall exhibits where three remain open to visitors.

How to live with psychosis? Luckily most of us won’t experience it, but artist Marcus Coates has gotten into it for a series of six films where it’s directed by those who have lived with psychosis as to what it actually looks like. Placed throughout Pimlico in a community center, apartment, medical center and shops, these living spaces amplify the impact of the powerful artwork. Until October 30.

Get ready for quantum art in an exhibition by Libby Heaney – blending the worlds of fine art and quantum physics. Distorted works of art are created using code in a quantum computer, combining the vanguards of art and technology. Along with this there is a playful element with slime mold and a video piece covering quantum entanglement can be viewed while entangled in the tentacles of a soft giant octopus. Until October 16.

Taking inspiration from archaeological digs where paper is normally taped to a map of a dig site to mark important points, Emily Wolfe has created beautiful trompe l’oeil paintings of landscapes that will make you want to choose the strips to remove them from the work. . It’s also a new gallery find for me, with good programming, which is always a treat. Until October 1.

Philpot is a British artist I had never heard of but his work is a real find, especially his soft and beautiful portraits of black men and queer subjects. There is such tenderness in the works and they are radical in that they were painted in the 1910s to 1930s. Until October 23.

Tiny figures fleeing with the shadow of an airplane above their heads, people being beaten by police and others in what appears to be a barrel-sight. With another painting that looks like blood splatters, violence is shown or evoked in works that are all the more powerful as the artist was born and lived in Spain under Franco. October 29.

All images are courtesy of the artist and organization. Photo Artangel: Hugo Glendinning. Hope you enjoy this week top 5 exhibitions to see inside and outside London.

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Tabish Khan

Art critic for FAD and Londonist. Visit as many exhibitions as possible and write reviews, opinion pieces and a weekly top 5 for FAD.

Still-from-The-Directors-Marcus-Coates-2022-

The Directors includes five short films by artist Marcus Coates, commissioned and produced by Artangel in collaboration with people recovering from a lived experience of psychosis

Art in a church, underground and illuminating the darkness.

Artangel will present a specially commissioned sound installation at London’s iconic Senate Library with thousands of words for the weather […]

Award-winning artist Ayo Akingbade will present his new 25-minute film Jitterbug, continuing his exploration of London’s rapidly changing landscape and the consequences […]

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baby | Exhibitions | MutualArt https://marlborough-monaco.com/baby-exhibitions-mutualart/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 22:27:50 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/baby-exhibitions-mutualart/ Bimbo is a photography exhibition in the hall of the Fundació Miró, which accompanies the temporary exhibition Paul Klee and the secrets of nature. It takes as its starting point the passion for cats shared by the dancer and photographer Nora Baylach (Granollers, 1994) and the Swiss-German artist Paul Klee (1879-1940). This fascination is linked […]]]>

Bimbo is a photography exhibition in the hall of the Fundació Miró, which accompanies the temporary exhibition Paul Klee and the secrets of nature. It takes as its starting point the passion for cats shared by the dancer and photographer Nora Baylach (Granollers, 1994) and the Swiss-German artist Paul Klee (1879-1940).

This fascination is linked to the admiration Klee felt for felines as animals that are not bound by the same gravitational limitations as humans. In the same way, a dancer’s body can attain some of the motor qualities of cats, which are beyond the abilities of most people.

The title of the exhibition refers to Bimbo, one of the many cats that Klee kept as pets throughout his life, and which he photographed with true devotion. Nora Baylach studied these photos and was inspired by them to create a photo session – in the street – devoted to a single cat: an anonymous cat with a white coat and eyes of different colors.

For this new multiple portrait of this new Bimbo, Baylach has decided to return to analog technology, fully aware of the fact that film reels are almost impossible to find and do not waste. This involved finding the best way to use the available film and deciding when to take the best picture possible after a long wait; an expectation that allowed him to carefully study the gestures of the animal, to approach it and get to know it as if it were a model photographed naturally. The result is a sequence of 18 images, 18 moments, some of which are very reminiscent of the many drawings Klee made of his cats.

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10 exhibitions not to miss in Canterbury in August https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-miss-in-canterbury-in-august/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-miss-in-canterbury-in-august/ In August, Warren Feeney is excited about a new gallery of Pacific art in the city center and looks forward to an exhibition of artists also wandering around and one of the previously unseen paintings from Gretchen Albrecht’s studio. Hanna Kidd, The comfort of the South, The Central Art Gallery, Christchurch Center for the Arts, […]]]>

In August, Warren Feeney is excited about a new gallery of Pacific art in the city center and looks forward to an exhibition of artists also wandering around and one of the previously unseen paintings from Gretchen Albrecht’s studio.

Hanna Kidd, The comfort of the South, The Central Art Gallery, Christchurch Center for the Arts, 2 Worcester Boulevard

A graduate of the Otago Polytechnic School of Art, Hannah Kidd’s famous corrugated iron sculptures also reveal the influence of a time spent with an engineering firm in her hometown of Methven. Among his favorite subjects are farm animals and Southern comfort is an exhibition about dogs. Avoiding sentimentality, his corrugated metal canines are stunning in their individuality and physical presence – absolutely recommended viewing. July 29 – August 28.

Filipe Tohi, Fish in the Net, 2022, (Haulomilomi), wood, wool and nails (Fibre Gallery)

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Filipe Tohi, Fish in the Net, 2022, (Haulomilomi), wood, wool and nails (Fibre Gallery)

Dagmar Dyck, Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka and Filipe Tohi, Models of the past – Formatting of the future, Fiber Gallery, Level 1, 285 Cashel Street

There is a new gallery in Ōtautahi Christchurch and it is dedicated to the art of the Pacific, its artists and its communities. Founded by Nina Oberg Humphries and the Tagata Moana Trust, its opening exhibition features three senior artists from the Pacific; Filipe Tohi, Dagmar Dyck and Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, embodying the gallery’s commitment to Pacific culture and a broader strategy of visibility and empowerment. July 12 – August 21

Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogdendgen-Travis, Exquisite Corpse #1, 2022, mixed media, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogdendgen-Travis, Exquisite Corpse #1, 2022, mixed media, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogden-Travis, ConsequencesIlam Campus Gallery, Fine Arts Lane, near Clyde Rd

Consequences is the second of four exhibitions in Ilam Campus Gallery’s annual student series, consisting of an assemblage of works by BFA (Honours) students Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long and James Newey, and painting student of MFA Rupert Ogden-Travis. Working through graphic design, painting and sculpture, all the artists engage with an attitude as playful as they are curious, delivering unforeseen consequences and surprises galore in the making of each work. August 4-12

Neil Dawson, Poise, 2022, acrylic, aluminum, polycarbonate, automotive paint, (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Neil Dawson, Poise, 2022, acrylic, aluminum, polycarbonate, automotive paint, (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

Neil Dawson, balance, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham

Sculptor Neil Dawson is widely acclaimed for Fanfare, one of the largest public works of art in the country, but its sculpture continually oscillates between monumentality and intimacy. Dawson’s Horizons The Gibbs Farm facility in Auckland is 36 meters wide, while its floating feathers measure around 2 meters. Individual and visually deceptive in their undulating surfaces and light, Dawson’s works in balance share the multiple complexities that support and characterize his practice. August 4 – September 3.

Gretchen Albrecht, Illumination (celestial), 1977, acrylic on canvas (NMG Nadine Milne Gallery)

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Gretchen Albrecht, Illumination (celestial), 1977, acrylic on canvas (NMG Nadine Milne Gallery)

Gretchen Albrecht, nine illuminations 1975 – 1978, NMG, 141 Cambridge Tce

Writer and art curator Anne Kirker describes Gretchen Albrecht’s paintings as key to validating abstraction in the visual arts in Aotearoa, with the artist working towards a ‘distilled visual statement’ which Kirker identifies as the one of the finest produced in this country. by Albrecht nine illuminations is an introduction to previously unseen paintings from 1975 to 1978, its imagery progressing as “more a metaphor for landscape than a direct translation of it”. August 5 – September 10.

Marti Freidlander, 1974, Tramping, Arthur's Pass, South Island, photograph, (Oxford Gallery toi o Waimakariri)

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Marti Freidlander, 1974, Tramping, Arthur’s Pass, South Island, photograph, (Oxford Gallery toi o Waimakariri)

No. 2 ART Tramp ShowOxford Gallery thee o Waimakariri, 72 Main St, Oxford

Twenty-five artists take a walk and open a large collective exhibition in Oxford. Art Tramp Show #2 represents four generations of artists, from photographer Mark Adams to conceptual artist Jae-Hoon Lee. Curator Areta Wilkinson invites everyone to the opening weekend, with participating artists hosting gear talks, a boot repair demo, field cooking, tramping trip slideshows and all heading for the hills. August 25 – September 18.

Olivia Chamberlain, Night Fall, 2022, acrylic on cotton on board, (City Art Depot)

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Olivia Chamberlain, Night Fall, 2022, acrylic on cotton on board, (City Art Depot)

Olivia Chamberlain, Cuts, City Art, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham

Cuts may seem somewhat understated as an exhibition title, but for Olivia Chamberlain it encompasses many of her materials, decision-making and the processes of her practice, drawing our attention to paintings about the close experience of qualities their aesthetics; color, surfaces, materials and the nature of their evocative relationships. August 16 – September 5.

Marian Maguire, Sight and Blindness 2: Expansion, 2018-21, archival inkjet print, (PG gallery192)

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Marian Maguire, Sight and Blindness 2: Expansion, 2018-21, archival inkjet print, (PG gallery192)

Marianne Maguire, Enlightenment projectsPG gallery192, 192 Bealey Avenue

In Enlightenment Projects, master printmaker Marian Maguire connects the dots between Western art, 19th century colonialism and Aotearoa history. Visually and philosophically, Maguire connects European expansionism, the Enlightenment, theology, politics, law, science, ethnography and more, in an exhibition as question-rich as it is confronting and illuminating. . August 9 – September 2.

Heidi Brickell, Pakanga for the lostgirl, (detail of work in progress), 2021, (The Physics Room)

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Heidi Brickell, Pakanga for the lostgirl, (detail of work in progress), 2021, (The Physics Room)

Heidi Brickell, (Te Hika o Papauma, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rangitāne, Rongomaiwahine) Pakanga for the lost girl, The Physics Room, 301 Montreal Street

A work commissioned from St Paul’s Gallery in Auckland, Pakanga for the lost girl is a multimedia installation. A recent graduate of the University of Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Arts, the diversity of Brickell’s materials and the diverse relationships and questions they represent across multiple possibilities and viewpoints, opens up and confounds a single reading in this, his first personal exhibition. August 5 – September 11.

Peter McIntyre, Canterbury Shearing Shed, 1961, oil on canvas, The Kelliher Art Trust (<a class=Ashburton Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Peter McIntyre, Canterbury Shearing Shed, 1961, oil on canvas, The Kelliher Art Trust (Ashburton Art Gallery)

Rare and Unparalleled Beauty. Award-winning landscapes from the Kelliher Art Trust collection. Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

The first national art prize in Aotearoa (1956-1977), Rare and Unparalleled Beauty is an exhibition of paintings by Kelliher Prize-winning artists. The award has always advocated for landscape painting as opposed to modernism, celebrating its role as art for the “average person”. Today its significance lies in its history, and more immediately in a welcome encounter with paintings by artists like Austen Deans and Peter McIntyre. August 8 – October 2.

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The top 7 painting exhibitions to see in London this summer https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-7-painting-exhibitions-to-see-in-london-this-summer/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 22:38:47 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-7-painting-exhibitions-to-see-in-london-this-summer/ Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic chooses his favorite exhibitions to see in London where an installation or installations make up the bulk of the show. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more exhibits should check out his art installation exhibits, where all but one remain […]]]>

Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic chooses his favorite exhibitions to see in London where an installation or installations make up the bulk of the show. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more exhibits should check out his art installation exhibits, where all but one remain open.

Sholto Blissett: Ship of Fools @ Hannah Barry Gallery
These stunning landscapes feature abandoned architecture as if humans have just left and nature is swiftly returning to destroy it as buildings teeter over waterfalls and on unstable ground, blending an environmental message with the painting’s rich history. of romantic landscape. Until August 13.

Nelson Makamo @ Rise Art, 67 Great Titchfield Street
The stereotypical image of children in Africa often shows them in difficult situations to raise funds for charity campaigns. Nelson Makamo shows us a different angle that also attracts children playing, smiling and being comfortable. These are intimate drawings and paintings where he captures some of their innocence and spirit in his works. Until August 25.

Sougwen Chung: Virtual Ink @ Gillian Jason Gallery
These simple portraits created with sparse lines appear to have been made with traditional brushstrokes but were actually created in virtual reality before being printed on paper or silk hung in the gallery. The virtual and physical worlds are linked by these beautiful works in their simplicity. Until August 13.

Araminta Blue: Limon @ Rosenfeld
His large-scale paintings moved away from the more figurative works that first attracted me to his work, and ventured more into the abstract – while remaining true to his awe-inspiring style. From the references visible in the pieces, it is clear that these new works reflect her recent motherhood, and the move to larger pieces sees her work evolve in a new direction. Until July 30.

Catherine Goodman: And everything changed in Marlborough
Figures blend into the natural world around them in these large, expressive gesture paintings. These views of people reconnecting with nature are one for painting fans, as the works are incredibly textured. Until August 26.

Ross Taylor: Moment of the season @ Beers London
Bursting with color, these landscapes can be based on the real world, but amplified to another level with vivid hues that make them feel almost alien. These dreamlike paintings are a feast for the eyes. Until September 3.

Kyle Barnes: Second Skin @ Albemarle Gallery
These hyper-real portraits show faces covered in liquid, as if soaked in oil. The most impressive are those that give the impression of being covered in liquid metal, as the artist has beautifully captured the reflective surfaces. Until August 28

Photo by Ross Taylor: Damian Griffiths. All images are copyrighted by the artist and the gallery.

Categories

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Tabish Khan

Art critic for FAD and Londonist. Visit as many exhibitions as possible and write reviews, opinion pieces and a weekly top 5 for FAD.

Religion, memory, culture, Elvis and motherhood.

London Gallery Weekend kicks off this Friday, May 13, with hundreds of special events and exhibitions across London. To help you navigate, we asked Hector Campbell, writer, curator and author of the weekly emerging art newsletter ‘The Shock of the Now’, to pick his top picks from London’s selection of small and midsize galleries.

“Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards,” said Søren Kierkegaard in the mid-19th century, suggesting […]

Istituzione Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa will host a solo exhibition by South Korean artist Ha Chong-Hyun (b. 1935, Sancheong). Presented by the Kukje Art and Culture Foundation.

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10 exhibitions not to miss in Canterbury in July https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-miss-in-canterbury-in-july/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-miss-in-canterbury-in-july/ Warren Feeney recommends an exhibition that reveals the experiences and results of some of those close to the 1957 nuclear weapons tests in the Pacific, one by an artist whose paintings take on unique personalities day and night, and one of paintings that evoke memories of the Old Masters. Denise Baynham’s Operation Grapple: We Were […]]]>

Warren Feeney recommends an exhibition that reveals the experiences and results of some of those close to the 1957 nuclear weapons tests in the Pacific, one by an artist whose paintings take on unique personalities day and night, and one of paintings that evoke memories of the Old Masters.

Denise Baynham’s Operation Grapple: We Were There, Canterbury Museum, 11 Rolleston Ave

“All of that bomb testing was coming back to me like a panic attack. I ended up doing 16 sessions with a psychologist… my grandson died at 24. He had testicular cancer and bone cancer, what I thought was my fault because of my genes HMNZS Rotoiti radio operator Tere Tahi revealing memories of his support for British Navy nuclear weapons testing in the Pacific in 1957. Documenting the experience By 19 New Zealand Navy sailors through interviews and photographs, Denise Baynham’s Operation Grapple: We Were There, is a tearful, unsettling and timely exhibit.

Motoko Kikkawa, Engine in nature, 2021, photographic light box, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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Motoko Kikkawa, Engine in nature, 2021, photographic light box, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

Presentation Layer: Forms, Platforms and NFT Transfer, Ilam Campus Gallery, Fine Arts Lane, off Clyde Rd

An exhibition that asks many questions about NFTs (non-fungible tokens), how an artist might respond to technology and its presence through their practice – and more. Presentation Layer is also a stunning visual experience with an accompanying catalog that defuses the darkness that NFTs currently possess. Co-hosted by Antistatic, Nina Dyer and Raewyn Martyn, Presentation Layer has a timely and welcome attitude and thoughtfulness. Until July 15

Salle Larisse, time is.  A Surprise, 2021, oil, 12V LED light, hand-stretched shapes/cotton, (The Central <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Salle Larisse, time is. A Surprise, 2021, oil, 12V LED light, hand-stretched shapes/cotton, (The Central Art Gallery)

Salle Larisse, the time has come. Gasoline, The Central Art Gallery, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora, 2 Worcester Blvd

Tāmaki Makaurau-based artist Larisse Hall is holding her first solo exhibition in Ōtautahi, featuring a new series of her “light-infused” paintings. Hall’s stretched cotton wall paintings/sculptures, and the light that shines within and beyond their surfaces is magical, a conversation between the ephemeral and the material, with the Central Art Gallery open for a selection of day and night. (details: https:///thecentral.co.nz). Until July 24.

Miles Dover, Tête-à-Tête, 2022, mixed media on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

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Miles Dover, Tête-à-Tête, 2022, mixed media on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

Miles Dover, New Paintings, Windsor Gallery, 386 St Asaph St

Originally from Southampton and residing in Ōtautahi since 2002, Miles Dover’s paintings reconsider the nature of our relationships with each other, tangible connections and estrangements. Dover works with a range of media including acrylics, spray paint, charcoal, brushes, stencils and palette knives, the humor and darkness of his paintings shared democratically between humans and sometimes domesticated associates. July 1 to 31.

Karin Barr, The Blues, Quintuplets, 2022, cast glass on Timaru Bluestone (Susan Badcock Gallery)

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Karin Barr, The Blues, Quintuplets, 2022, cast glass on Timaru Bluestone (Susan Badcock Gallery)

Karin Barr and Graeme Hitchcock, Cast Glass, Susan Badcock Gallery, 47 rue Talbot, Geraldine

Famous for his “men in ties, looking upwards”, glass artist Graeme Hitchcock shares the space of the Susan Badcock Gallery with the refined geometric sculptures and evocative abstract figures of Karin Barr. Recognizing the influence of German Bauhaus design, Barr’s interest in the possibilities of cast glass is complemented by his use of additional materials including stone, wood and metal. 9 – 30 July.

Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, 2021, oil on panel (Chambers Gallery)

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Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, 2021, oil on panel (Chambers Gallery)

Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham

Casey Bailey’s oil on panel paintings evoke reflections on European art, Old Masters, portraiture and landscape painting. Yet Bailey brings new life and relevance to her subjects and materials, grounded in her intuitive understanding of their potential, capturing the immediacy of a moment in time and paying due attention to the distinct qualities of her practice. July 13-30.

David Elliot, The Whistling Bull, mixed media on paper, (<a class=Ashburton Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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David Elliot, The Whistling Bull, mixed media on paper, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

David Elliot and Jack Lasenby, The Whistling Bull, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St

Internationally recognized as a writer/illustrator of children’s books, David Elliot also has a working relationship with children’s author Jack Lasenby. In Ashburton Art Gallery’s survey exhibition, The Whistling Bull, they confirm that they make an excellent combination. Until August 19.

Fayne Robinson, (Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu), Ngā Hoe and Lisa Harding (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine), Poipoiā and Moemoeā (Pumanawa Gallery)

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Fayne Robinson, (Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu), Ngā Hoe and Lisa Harding (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine), Poipoiā and Moemoeā (Pumanawa Gallery)

Paula Rigby, Fayne Robinson, Riki Manuel, Zena Elliott, Helena Rollo, Lisa Harding, Corabelle Summerton, Alix Ashworth, Asher Newbery and Piri Cowie, Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, Matariki, Pūmanawa Gallery, The Arts Center

A group exhibition celebrating Matariki, featuring an impressive line-up of artists working in raranga (weaving), whakairo (sculpture), waituhi (drawing) and pakoko (sound). Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, Matariki brings together generations of artists, from famed sculptor Riki Manual to emerging installation artist Alix Ashworth. Until July 9.

Polish artist Pener approaches one of his impressive abstract murals in Europe, (Fiksate Gallery)

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Polish artist Pener approaches one of his impressive abstract murals in Europe, (Fiksate Gallery)

Pener, Vacation from Reality, Fiksate Gallery, 54 Hawden St, Sydenham

Fiksate welcomes international street artist Pener (Bartek Świątecki) as artist-in-residence in July. Over the past two decades, his imagery has evolved through site-specific paintings, animations and installations, believable in their engagement with abstract images that encompass all in their spatial ambiguities. Street art scholar Reuben Woods describes Pener as the artist pushing graffiti aesthetics in new directions. Opening July 15.

Karen Sewell, Awakenings IV, 2020 Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland, earlier version of Luminary, (Oxford Baptist Church)

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Karen Sewell, Awakenings IV, 2020 Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland, earlier version of Luminary, (Oxford Baptist Church)

Karen Sewell, Light Fixture, Oxford Terrace Baptist Church, 286 Oxford Tce

Luminary is a traveling exhibition by Karen Sewell, a Tāmaki Makaurau-based artist working in installation, as well as photography, sculpture, video, and sound and light. In its materials and processes, Luminary is an invitation to the artist to contemplate the “wonder of things”, the choice of exhibition spaces in places of prayer, encouraging the consideration of the world, mysticism, spirituality and the contemplation. July 16 – 24.

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10 exhibitions you can’t miss in Canterbury in June https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-you-cant-miss-in-canterbury-in-june/ Sat, 28 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-you-cant-miss-in-canterbury-in-june/ In June, Warren Feeney looks forward to an exhibition that commends all of us to undertake an act of generosity, the display of a sculpture by Ōtautahi’s most overlooked sculptor, and a mural that celebrates the city’s unique relationship with Japan. Maori moving picture ki Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o […]]]>

In June, Warren Feeney looks forward to an exhibition that commends all of us to undertake an act of generosity, the display of a sculpture by Ōtautahi’s most overlooked sculptor, and a mural that celebrates the city’s unique relationship with Japan.

Maori moving picture ki Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetūcorner Montreal St and Worcester Blvd.

Described as a “rich collection of works that explore time, politics, language and place – and karaoke!” Māori Moving Image ki Te Puna o Waiwhetū is a collaboration between Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū and the Dowse Art Museum. Curated by Melanie Oliver and Bridget Reti, the exhibition continues the influential momentum of contemporary Maori art, nationally and internationally, with its origins and authority now stretching back over seven decades. June 4 – October 6.

Left to right: Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme'a Burrows, The Last Kai Gift, and Metiria Turei, Whanokē, installation image, (Ashburton <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Left to right: Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows, The Last Kai Gift, and Metiria Turei, Whanokē, installation image, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

gift, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West Street, Ashburton.

The Gift of Group Exhibition features 12 artists representing many identities and cultures: Rachel Hope Allan, Dr Margo Barton, Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows, Neil Emmerson, Alice Jones, Madison Kelly (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe) , Dr Stella Lange, Anna Muirhead, Louise Sutherland, Metiria Turei (Ngāti Kahungunu, Te Ātihaunui-a-Pāpārangi) and Georgina May Young (Te Upokorehe, Whakatōhea, Irish). Curated by Victoria Bell and Dr. Natalie Smith, The Gift’s attention to acts of generosity between individuals, communities and cultures, encourages us, by example, to share and also participate in an act of generosity. May 8 – June 19.

Matthew McIntyre Wilson, He Mahi Kupenga, Alexander Turnbull Library.  Photograph by the artist.  (Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri)

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Matthew McIntyre Wilson, He Mahi Kupenga, Alexander Turnbull Library. Photograph by the artist. (Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri)

Matthew McIntyre-Wilson, Matariki Artist in Residence, Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri, Main Street, Oxford.

Weaver and sculptor Matthew McIntyre-Wilson (Taranaki, Ngā Mahanga and Titahi) has woven geometric patterns, grounded in raranga whakairo (braiding) with precious metals, treasures in the intimacy of their detail and vast possibilities. In June, McIntyre-Wilson is Oxford Gallery’s artist-in-residence Toi o Waimakariri, holding workshops for all and transforming the gallery into an active working studio. June 23 – July 17.

John Parker, Matte white grooved bottle/container and polychrome ring.  Photography, Ryan Dewsbury (Forms Gallery)

Ryan Dewsbury

John Parker, Matte white grooved bottle/container and polychrome ring. Photography, Ryan Dewsbury (Forms Gallery)

John Parker, Shape and Color, Gallery of Shapes, 468 Colombo Street, Sydenham.

Renowned potter John Parker has maintained the vitality of his ceramics for over five decades, committed to design principles based on the refined aesthetics of European modernism. In Form and Colour, Parker reveals his enduring commitment to Bauhaus traditions, his familiar monochrome ceramics complemented by new colored polychrome “wall rings”, proof that Parker continues to explore new, uncharted territory. June 4-25

William Trethewey, Sacrifice, 1937, cast bronze.  (Canterbury Museum)

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William Trethewey, Sacrifice, 1937, cast bronze. (Canterbury Museum)

The Sacrifice of William Trethewey, Canterbury MuseumRolleston Ave.

William Trethewey (1892–1956) is Aotearoa’s most overlooked sculptor, but responsible for some of our most important public artwork, particularly in his hometown of Ōtautahi Christchurch. Trethewey’s Citizen’s War Memorial, 1937, previously in Cathedral Square, is currently being restored, but the Canterbury Museum is hosting one of its five figures, Sacrifice. Influenced by Trethewey’s admiration for Michelangelo, the cast bronze form of the figure acquires a new and commanding presence in the museum foyer. In progress.

Lee Harper, The Sow's Ear, 2022, vinyl, polyester and cotton, (Art on the Quay)

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Lee Harper, The Sow’s Ear, 2022, vinyl, polyester and cotton, (Art on the Quay)

The Partners, PLACE, Art on the Quay176 Williams Street, Kaiapoi.

Les Associés is a collective of 10 artists, their work characterized by its response to domestic and environmental issues, their exhibition, PLACE, reconsidering the realities of its subjects. For example: Lee Harper’s The Sow’s Ear is a fond memory of a childhood home qualified by the memory of his mother’s observation: “I walked past our house one day and my mother said, ‘You don’t can’t make a silk purse out of a sow”. ear’. Not a judgement, rather a statement of fact. From June 9 to July 13.

Kara Burrowes, Absentia VI, (detail), 2022, oil and plaster on panel, (Chambers Gallery)

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Kara Burrowes, Absentia VI, (detail), 2022, oil and plaster on panel, (Chambers Gallery)

Kara Burrowes, Lost Space, Chambers Gallery80 Durham Street, Sydenham.

Currently completing her MFA at Ilam School of Fine Arts, Lost Space by Kara Burrowes is about our experience of the earth and also an encounter with the qualities of her oil and canvas paintings. plaster on panel. Burrowes exceeds expectations in landscape paintings that are as provocative and contemporary as they are believable in their sophistication and mastery of materials. June 1-18.

Jillian Wordsworth, Ask the Darkness, Seek the Light, 2022, oil on canvas (Murray & Co – Emerging Artists in Conversation)

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Jillian Wordsworth, Ask the Darkness, Seek the Light, 2022, oil on canvas (Murray & Co – Emerging Artists in Conversation)

Hana Olsen and Jillian Wordsworth: Emerging Artists in ConversationMurray & Co.

Investment banking firm Murray & Co’s long-term commitment to Ōtautahi arts graduates in 2022 sees the work of artists Barbara Boekelman, Hana Olsen, Chloe Summerhayes and Jillian Wordsworth exhibited at the firm’s offices at Durham St. The exhibition also features two lunchtime events, the second in June the opportunity to hear Olsen and Wordsworth discuss their work with University of Canterbury painting professor Raewyn Martyn . To attend: murrayandco-emerging-artists-in-conversation.eventbrite.co.nz. Friday, June 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Chris Heaphy, Your Song, 2022, acrylic on Belgian linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Chris Heaphy, Your Song, 2022, acrylic on Belgian linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

Chris Heaphy, Everyday Life, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham.

After at least two decades of paintings that focused their attention on silhouetted patterns, figurative images, and graphics, in Everyday Life Chris Heaphy apparently prioritized painting as the subject of his attention. In Your Song, the artist’s title could be about his painterly surfaces, the result of painting on linen, stretching and blurring his images, and intensifying our engagement with color and space. . June 1-30.

For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in June: 10 Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end), (Flare Festival, Salt District)

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For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in June: 10 Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end), (Flare Festival, Salt District)

Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end). Salt district, center of Ōtautahi.

With 44 new works of art being performed for the March Flare Festival, all at the intersection of the Salt District with High, Manchester and St Asaph streets, the city center should be high on everyone’s list for an art experience serious. A highlight is the festival audience’s choice of A Hum (the Beginning and the End) by Japanese-born Koryu. The largest mural done for the festival, and singled out by street art scholar Reuben Woods: “The work touches on many levels, drawing on the shared experiences of the Ōtautahi earthquakes and the tremors of land and the Tohuku tsunami, which occurred a few weeks after each other… Koryu considers his figures [in this work] as guardians of the city.

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10 exhibitions not to be missed in May https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-may/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-may/ In May, Warren Feeney looks forward to an exhibition on returning home or to places we care about, an 11-minute film in te reo Māori that spans time, place and generations, and a new public mural with a larger than life presence. . Richard McWhannell, A Picture for Oum Kalthoum, 2018 -19, oil on canvas […]]]>

In May, Warren Feeney looks forward to an exhibition on returning home or to places we care about, an 11-minute film in te reo Māori that spans time, place and generations, and a new public mural with a larger than life presence.

Richard McWhannell, A Picture for Oum Kalthoum, 2018 -19, oil on canvas board, (PGgallery192)

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Richard McWhannell, A Picture for Oum Kalthoum, 2018 -19, oil on canvas board, (PGgallery192)

Richard McWhannell, More Miles Than Money, PGgallery 192, 192 Bealey Avenue. For five decades, Richard McWhannell has upended our certainties and our assumptions about just about everything. Outwardly the subjects of his paintings are figures and landscapes, but McWhannell penetrates beneath the outward appearances, each painting seeming to discover its subjects anew. More Miles Than Money is no exception, McWhannell’s fragmented vision of a world both familiar and unfamiliar, inviting us to look – and look again. May 17-June 17

Amy Couling, Fushimi Inari Taisha, 2020, gouache on paper (109 Cathedral Junction)

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Amy Couling, Fushimi Inari Taisha, 2020, gouache on paper (109 Cathedral Junction)

Amy Couling, MIYAKO, Shop 9, Cathedral Junction, 109 Worcester St. Based in Ōtautahi, Amy Couling’s Miyako (京) exhibition takes its name from Kyoto, the former capital that is also her hometown in Japan. Couling reflects on the ongoing pandemic, the lack of his family and friends, and the desire to be back in a specific place or a second home at a world’s fair in his feeling and attitude towards returning to home or in places that are dear to us. May 17-June 5

Irenie How, I don't feel different from the universe anymore, 20-22, digital image (Art Hole)

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Irenie How, I don’t feel different from the universe anymore, 20-22, digital image (Art Hole)

Irenie How, Skin Starving, Art Hole, 336 St Asaph St. Drawing attention to the nature of our complex relationships with the possibilities of digital technology and the worlds it promises, Irenie How critiques, embraces and negates the promises of its results. The world and characters of Skin Starving are characterized by a confronting and questioning presence, raucous confessionals, and shrewd stunt doubles aware of their status as both insiders and outsiders. May 11-14

Jeremy Leatinu'u, Te Whakawhitinga (production still, image by Ian Powell), 16mm black and white film, 2022, (The Physics Room)

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Jeremy Leatinu’u, Te Whakawhitinga (production still, image by Ian Powell), 16mm black and white film, 2022, (The Physics Room)

Jeremy Leatinuʻu Te Whakawhitinga, The Physics Room, 301 Montreal St, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora. An 11-minute film commissioned by The Physics Room and directed by Jeremy Leatinu’u, Te Whakawhitinga is rich, thoughtful cinema. The film’s narrative is in te reo Māori, following the story of a young man leaving his home in the Far North. At the heart of his experience are his complex narratives, spanning time, place and generations, through multiple voices as his traveler journeys South. April 29-June 3

Stephen Bambury, World Still Turning: A Work in Seven Parts (No.1-7), 2008/2022, seven framed inkjet prints on 300gsm Hahnemuhle photorag paper, (NMG Gallery)

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Stephen Bambury, World Still Turning: A Work in Seven Parts (No.1-7), 2008/2022, seven framed inkjet prints on 300gsm Hahnemuhle photorag paper, (NMG Gallery)

Stephen Bambury, either/or/and, NMG, 141 Cambridge Terrace. For more than four decades, Stephen Bambury’s geometric abstract paintings have focused their attention on the circle, the cross and the square. Yet that is only part of his story. The outward austerity of previous and current exhibitions, on the surface, counteracts our attention to experiencing the materials of his work and its capacity as a medium for stories about humanity and our philosophies. Bambury’s work is, indeed, concerned with the very substance of being. April 29-May 29

Julia Holderness, Florence Weir, Mixed Flowers (Summer), 2022, cotton and mesh (The National)

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Julia Holderness, Florence Weir, Mixed Flowers (Summer), 2022, cotton and mesh (The National)

Julia Holderness, The Studio, The National, 249 Moorhouse Avenue. Artist and art historian Julia Holderness creates real and imagined stories about New Zealand art. Her collective exhibition, The Studio, reveals and celebrates the story of three female artists: Doris Lusk, Anne Hamblett and Mollie Lawn. Taking up space in their 1930s art studio in Dunedin, Holderness is also inviting the Dunedin Group to expand their new curated exhibition with current contemporary local artists: Julia Holden, Kirstin Carlin, Richard Orjis and Tatyanna Meharry. May 4-June 4

Xoë Hall, Kuīni of the Worlds, 2022, mural (Christchurch <a class=Art Gallery bunker)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Xoë Hall, Kuīni of the Worlds, 2022, mural (Christchurch Art Gallery bunker)

Xoë Hall, Kuīni of the Worlds, 2022, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū Bunker, Montreal St. Illustrator Xoë Hall faced a tough challenge as the artist chosen to follow Jess Johnson, Genetekker Archaic, provided the new public mural on the outside bunker of the Christchurch Art Gallery on Montreal Street. the gallery’s most important public space, the larger-than-life Hall’s have absolute control of the site, with an equally larger-than-life presence, joyful in their welcome to all.

Ellie Gray, Church Lane, 2022 (Chambers Gallery)

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Ellie Gray, Church Lane, 2022 (Chambers Gallery)

Ellie Gray, CHristCHurch, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham. Ellie Gray’s paintings reconsider architectural structures and buildings that are spatially ambiguous and uninhabitable, yet remain a consistently fascinating encounter. His exhibition CHristCHurch, presents a series of architectural plans and studies of church buildings, visually deceptive but welcoming, serving as an introduction to the paradoxical nature of his subjects; the three-dimensional structures on two-dimensional surfaces representing an entry point to imaginary but believable worlds. May 11-28

Francis van Hout, Disillusioned Thinker, 2022, oil on canvas (City Art)

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Francis van Hout, Disillusioned Thinker, 2022, oil on canvas (City Art)

Francis van Hout, Wry Thinker, City Art Depot, 96 Disraeli St, Sydenham. Wry Thinker is the title of Francis van Hout’s new exhibition at the City Art Depot and also one of his oil paintings on canvas. A first encounter with the artist’s titles for each of his exhibitions and works is often positioned between their neutrality of meaning and their thoughtful, evocative and understated possibilities, all equally sharing the stage, seemingly unassuming – yet central to his practice. . May 24-June 13

Nicola Thorne, Helen Chalmers, naturalist, 2022, archival pigment ink on Hahnemuhle paper (Stoddart Cottage)

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Nicola Thorne, Helen Chalmers, naturalist, 2022, archival pigment ink on Hahnemuhle paper (Stoddart Cottage)

Nicola Thorne, Women of the Peninsula, Stoddart Cottage Gallery, 2 Waipapa Avenue, Diamond Harbour. Charteris Bay photographer Nicola Thorne’s Peninsula Women brings together women represented by a range of professions, ages and locations. As a documentary photographer, it would be wrong to assume that Peninsula Women is characterized by fundamental objectivity for such images. Rather, the exhibition’s authority resides in its subjects and the diversity of roles and contexts they represent. Peninsula Women is a rich and enriching exhibition. May 6-29

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10 exhibitions not to be missed in April https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-april/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-april/ Warren Feeney’s list of April’s 10 must-see exhibits includes a video installation of the New Brighton coastline, an exhibit dedicated to his support of Women’s Refuge and the potential of the visual arts for well-being and community building. 1. In praise of Eion Stevens, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham An artist whose painting was […]]]>

Warren Feeney’s list of April’s 10 must-see exhibits includes a video installation of the New Brighton coastline, an exhibit dedicated to his support of Women’s Refuge and the potential of the visual arts for well-being and community building.

1. In praise of Eion Stevens, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham

An artist whose painting was often described as that of an “artist’s artist”, Eion Stevens (1952-2021) leaves a legacy of five decades of painting in which the solemnity and humor of the behaviors and circumstances of the humanity are examined and cherished, locating the unsuspecting gallery visitor in a familiar yet enigmatic world. Tribute to Eion Stevens is also Stevens’ inaugural biennial exhibition of selected paintings, their sale supporting Women’s Refuge. April 20 – May 7.

Francis Upritchard, Pano, 2021, rubber and wood.  (Christchurch <a class=Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Francis Upritchard, Pano, 2021, rubber and wood. (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū)

2. Francis Upritchard, paper, creature, stone, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St.

A first encounter with the sculptures and ceramics of Francis Upritchard might suggest that his handmade objects and paintings are not necessarily works that deliver familiar claims about a contemporary artist who “breaks boundaries”. Yet the more time spent with Upritchard’s work, the more his subjects are not what they initially appear, masking a particular grandeur that continues to underpin Upritchard’s practice and his audience. April 2 – July 24.

Kees Bruin, Doubting Thomas, 2021, oil on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

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Kees Bruin, Doubting Thomas, 2021, oil on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

3. Art Exhibition Open Weekend, 25 artists, 130 works, Windsor Gallery 385 St Asaph Street

During the second weekend of April, the Windsor Gallery holds a two-day exhibition of its represented artists. Among them is the photorealist Kees Bruin, an artist whose practice is arguably the best known internationally. In addition to his involvement with Christianity, surfing, mythology and science, the Old Masters are also among his subjects, Bruin’s favorite artists including Caravaggio, Giorgione and Vermeer. April 9-10.

4. Fiona O'Connor, installation image, photography: Sam Quinn (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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4. Fiona O’Connor, installation image, photography: Sam Quinn (Ilam Campus Gallery)

4. Melissa Macleod, Pig Face, Hare’s Tail and the New Day, Ilam Campus Gallery, School of Fine Arts, on Clyde Rd.

Melissa Macleod, New Brighton resident and 2021 Olivia Spencer Bower Award recipient, has put together a video installation that exudes allegiance and commitment to New Brighton. Yet there is more. Macleod’s contrasting images reveal the pleasure of “having the ocean as a neighbour” and the necessary responsibility associated with such privilege. Until April 29.

5. Installation Photography, Zonta Ashburton Female Art Awards 2022. Left to Right: Louise Palmer, Edwards + Johann, Kate Cairns, Bridgit Anderson, Alice Jones, Rebecca Thomson, Coral Broughton, Sandrine Castel, Floor: Rachel Sleigh (Ashburton Art Gallery)

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5. Installation Photography, Zonta Ashburton Female Art Awards 2022. Left to Right: Louise Palmer, Edwards + Johann, Kate Cairns, Bridgit Anderson, Alice Jones, Rebecca Thomson, Coral Broughton, Sandrine Castel, Floor: Rachel Sleigh (Ashburton Art Gallery)

5. Zonta Ashburton Female Art Prize 2022, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

Performance artist Audrey Baldwin is the recipient of the Zonta Ashburton Female Art Award in 2022. The award continues to go from strength to strength, a message that is reiterated in the accompanying exhibition catalog and the timely selection of Baldwin as her most recent recipient, his interactive/participatory project Art Chemist drawing attention to the importance and potential of the arts for well-being and community development. Until April 24.

Henry Turner, A Million Endings and an Ending, 2022, (City Art Depot)

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Henry Turner, A Million Endings and an Ending, 2022, (City Art Depot)

6. Henry Turner, APGA City Art Depot, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham.

Henry Turner describes the title of his new exhibition, APGA as “unknown”. Yet such an assertion serves as a smokescreen. APGA tackles the territory of found worlds populated by strange, “newly discovered” life forms and geology. Indeed, the exhibition insists that we direct our attention to the experience of Turner’s paintings, each functioning as a raised wall sculpture and a distinct experience of looking through the window. April 12 – May 2.

Simon Edwards, Kekerengu Dreamtime 6, 2022 (Central Art Gallery)

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Simon Edwards, Kekerengu Dreamtime 6, 2022 (Central Art Gallery)

7. 5 year celebration. The Central Art Gallery, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Center for the Arts, 2 Worcester Blvd.

The Central celebrates its 5th anniversary in April and its directors, Richard Laing and Jonathan Smart, celebrate 46 exhibitions during this period with a selection of senior, mid-career and emerging artists and an awareness of historical links with the former galleries of the Center for the Arts. Nineteen artists in the April exhibit range from recent graduate Zara Dolan to famed printmaker/painter Stanley Palmer. April 7 – May 15.

Jacob Yikes, A Temple Full of Chemicals, 2022, metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard.  (Fiksate Gallery)

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Jacob Yikes, A Temple Full of Chemicals, 2022, metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard. (Fiksate Gallery)

8. Jacob Yikes, even in the dark, Fiksate Gallery, 54 Hawdon Street, Sydenham.

Even in the darkness is Jacob Yikes’ most compelling exhibition to date, evident in the shades of paintings that are essentially self-portraits despite and because of the expansive landscapes that invade the gallery. Additionally, the imagery of Even in the darkness makes a connection with the mural Tuam St of the artist, Alice in Wonderland. Certainly work in metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard, Even in the darkness is Yikes at its best. April 1-30.

9. Julia Morison, one of 10 works in Omnium Gatherum: 10 Degrees of Separation, 2022, mixed media on board, Photo credit: John Collie.  (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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9. Julia Morison, one of 10 works in Omnium Gatherum: 10 Degrees of Separation, 2022, mixed media on board, Photo credit: John Collie. (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

9. Julia Morison, 6 (.) 3 degrees apart, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham. Julia Morison’s art is grounded in her engagement with many ideologies and philosophies across time and space, characterized in her painting and sculpture as open visual and theoretical conversations. The good news about 6 (.)3 degrees of separation is its realization in two parts; new works related to 1986 by Morison Vademecum II series and Omnium Gatheruman ongoing project since 2015. April 2 – May 7.

10. Poster: Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫

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10. Poster: Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫

ten. Wai Ching Chan and Tessa Ma’auga, Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫, The Physics Room, 201 Montreal Street, The Toi Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Centre.

The Physics Hall again exceeds expectations with an exhibit that shapes the ties between Aotearoa and the Chinese whakapapa. The lavish installation by artists Wai Ching Chan and Tessa Ma’auga uses traditional Chinese knotting, paper-cutting and weaving techniques with a diverse range of materials, connecting and reinforcing both objects and an idea of ​​an ambition. and a reality. Until April 24.

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The Arts Club presents two spring exhibitions by Ida Applebroog and Reginald Sylvester II https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-arts-club-presents-two-spring-exhibitions-by-ida-applebroog-and-reginald-sylvester-ii/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-arts-club-presents-two-spring-exhibitions-by-ida-applebroog-and-reginald-sylvester-ii/ Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. March 23 – May 15, 2022 The Arts Club London is delighted to announce two exhibitions, Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel bluecurated by Amelie von Wedel and Pernilla Holmes of Wedel Art and presented in the club’s Drawing Room and Ante Room. Ida […]]]>

Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. March 23 – May 15, 2022

The Arts Club London is delighted to announce two exhibitions, Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel bluecurated by Amelie von Wedel and Pernilla Holmes of Wedel Art and presented in the club’s Drawing Room and Ante Room.

Ida Applebroog: Birds

The Arts Club presents an exhibition by 92-year-old American artist Ida Applebroog, focusing on works from the recent Angry Birds of America series. A pioneer of the American and international feminist movement since the 1970s, the exhibition illustrates Applebroog’s extraordinary use of animal portraiture as a means of political investigation and critique.

Applebroog has challenged multiple artistic mediums to address themes of politics, power, mass media and sexuality for over six decades. In 2016 she developed an interest in ornithology, in particular the work of artist and ornithologist John James Audubon (1785 – 1851) who brought art and nature together. Applebroog began collecting taxidermy birds and related books, and through this inspiration continued to produce his own designs and models in plaster and paint.

The Arts Club selection offers a solid insight into the Angry Birds of America series, which Applebroog began directing in 2016. Created in a year that also saw the start of Donald J. Trump’s US presidency, an explosion of nationalism and anti-immigration policies, and the rise of #MeToo movement, the works echo the broader social turmoil of the moment. Depicting bird carcasses, Applebroog evokes the connection between beauty and violence in the natural and man-made worlds. At the same time, she immortalizes these creatures through her works, bringing their lives back into view. In doing so, Applebroog forms a metaphor for contemporary political life in America and a powerful call to action.

The Arts Club exhibition coincides with the artist’s major solo exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Somerset. The Arts Club and Wedel Art thank the artist, his studio team and Hauser & Wirth for their enthusiasm and for the great works that make up this exhibition.

See also

Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue

    Left: Reginald Sylvester II, Wandering Star, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in.  Right: Reginald Sylvester II, Strangers, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in.  © Reginald Sylvester II.  Images courtesy of the artist and Maximillian William, London.  Photography: Daniel Greer.

Left: Reginald Sylvester II, Wandering Star, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in. Right: Reginald Sylvester II, Strangers, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in. © Reginald Sylvester II. Images courtesy of the artist and Maximillian William, London. Photography: Daniel Greer.

The Arts Club is delighted to announce an exhibition of paintings by American artist Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. A rising star in international contemporary art, Sylvester’s radical abstract works are reminiscent of artists like Elaine de Kooning and Joan Mitchell, but with a frenetic energy and singular pictorial vocabulary that places him entirely in the present.

Sylvester’s works are informed by a range of experiences and research that belie his young age. His sensibility draws on the sense of media acquired from his time as a graphic designer, an in-depth knowledge of contemporary fashion and his historical grounding in abstract expressionist practices. Sylvester conceptualizes painting as a matter of finding, rather than spontaneously generating images, working in the realms that oscillate between the material and the spiritual. Its surfaces are a multi-layered sum of paint, each layer offering a story, a philosophy and a connection to parts of Sylvester’s biography, while also inviting the viewer to experience the paintings through their own subjective point of view.

Focusing on Sylvester’s recent blue paintings, feel blue sees a departure from its usual warmer palette in favor of cooler tones, inspired by Portishead’s 1994 avant-garde trip-hop album Dummy. The blue background of the painting recalls the iconic album cover, which features lead singer Beth Gibbons imposed on a cobalt blue background. Among Sylvester’s blues, brilliant whites, browns and purples are bursts of red that combine to create a lively and moving painting. On the top and bottom edges of the canvas, the abstract strokes have been covered with a linear wash of paint, reinforcing the geometry of the picture plane. More organic washes of sky and navy blue cascade throughout the piece, complementing the gestural strokes.

The Arts Club and Wedel Art are extremely grateful to Reginald Sylvester II for producing and exhibiting these tremendous works, and for the invaluable assistance of his Maximillian William Gallery, London.

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Murals, art galleries and new exhibitions to discover this spring https://marlborough-monaco.com/murals-art-galleries-and-new-exhibitions-to-discover-this-spring/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:03:44 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/murals-art-galleries-and-new-exhibitions-to-discover-this-spring/ Art by Anthea Hamilton at the 58th International Art Biennale on May 07, 2019 in Venice, Italy. Luca Zanon/Awakening/Getty Images The weather in New York is notoriously unpredictable between February and April (and indeed, all the time), but as soon as the sun breaks through the clouds and the temperature starts to climb, all bets […]]]>
Art by Anthea Hamilton at the 58th International Art Biennale on May 07, 2019 in Venice, Italy. Luca Zanon/Awakening/Getty Images

The weather in New York is notoriously unpredictable between February and April (and indeed, all the time), but as soon as the sun breaks through the clouds and the temperature starts to climb, all bets are off: it’s time to hop in the galleries, socialize and throw in a hot take or two. The warm evenings are coming and the gallery halls are adorned with stimulating works by exciting talents. You can stroll through Tribeca or take a left at Citi Field to head to the Queens Museum, where concurrent exhibits by Suzanne Lacy, Christine Sun Kim, and Stephanie Dinkins are about to launch.

Broadway Gallery — Jo Nigoghossian, March 31 – April 30

TriBeCa’s newly hatched Broadway Gallery has already made a name for itself under the leadership of Pascal Spengemann, former vice-president of the struggling Marlborough Gallery, but let’s not get bogged down in the hubbub of the industry. On March 31, Broadway launches an exhibition highlighting British-American artist Jo Nigoghossian, a 2009 graduate of Yale School of Art, whose gnarled sculptural works shimmer with aggressive neon. Nigoghossian’s oil paintings, however, are the focus of the Broadway show, and the offerings ooze the menace of late capitalism. In To throw (2020), a rocket with an uncertain future springs from its bearings surrounded by acrid black smoke; it sounds like Elon Musk’s worst nightmare. Escape Cruisemeanwhile, evokes the equally fascinating and terrifying boat carrying the titular characters of Taken away as if by magic.

O’Flaherty’s – Anthea Hamilton, March 31

O’Flaherty’s has just completed a murderous tribute to the warped mind of Ashley Bickerton, an 1980s New York neo-minimalist who abandoned the Big Apple for Bali in 1993 and never looked back. Next up is Anthea Hamilton, a Turner Prize shortlisted artist whose multiple practices include curatorial, sculpture and immersive installations. “The things I produce are often physically unstable – even based on a precarious balance – because I am interested in the image of a solution or the image of a question, or the way in which one begs the question,” Hamilton told the artist, writer and musician. Ross Simonini in November. “I feel like the work I do is just about publicizing the questions that pop into my head, rather than the solutions.”

Artist Christine Sun Kim’s new mural, ‘Time Owes Me Rest Again’ (2022), at the Queens Museum. Queen’s Museum

Queens Museum — Stephanie Dinkins, Suzanne Lacy and Christine Sun Kim, March 13

On March 13, the Queens Museum is simultaneously launching three separate exhibitions. “Stephanie Dinkins: On Love and Data” focuses on the artist’s use of artificial intelligence, techno, video and other mediums to advance ideas such as those expressed in her manifesto of 2020 Afro-nowism. “The Medium Isn’t the Only Message” covers decades of work by performance artist and activist Suzanne Lacy, who has always been oriented towards overturning cultural norms and challenging conventional modes of expression. Finally, “Time Owes Me Rest Again”, artist Christine Sun Kim’s mural tribute to ASL communication which also evokes Pop Art, will remain on display at the museum until January 2023.

A work by Hannah Taurins currently on display at Theta. Courtesy of Theta

Theta – Hannah Taurins, “Cover Girl,” February 23 – March 26

We can’t say enough good things about Theta, Jordan Barse’s less than a year old Tribeca gallery. Barse performed intimate, carefully curated shows consecutively; right now, you can check out Hannah Taurins: “Cover Girl,” which runs until March 26. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition, and Taurins renders female figures in pencil and paint, sometimes focusing on a pair of shiny patterned tights or the provocative gaze of a bare-breasted woman seen from afar. downstairs.

Cristine Brache’s work at Anonymous. anonymous gallery

Anonymous — Cristine Brache, “Bermuda Triangle”, February 24 – April 2

Artist Cristine Brache was raised strictly Catholic and has long harbored ambitions to become a nun. Her parents’ divorce shocked her: “I thought divorce defied the laws of physics, like unbreakable glass,” Brache wrote. “I went down a spiral wondering if something was real. I even tried to invoke satan, to prove that God existed. But Satan never came and my walls of perception crumbled along with my belief into a Christian god.”Bermuda Triangle” is an excavation of Brache’s crisis of faith.In the center of the Anonymous gallery is an inflatable pool, and on the water the artist projected a Super 8 film of a kissing couple transitioning to mouth-to-mouth sequences.Still images of the scenes line the walls, hemming the viewer with the suggestion that a cruel summer should follow spring.

Museum murals, gallery reflections and intimate exhibitions to discover this spring

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