Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 01:34:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough exhibitions – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 10 exhibitions not to be missed in April https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-april/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-not-to-be-missed-in-april/ Warren Feeney’s list of April’s 10 must-see exhibits includes a video installation of the New Brighton coastline, an exhibit dedicated to his support of Women’s Refuge and the potential of the visual arts for well-being and community building. 1. In praise of Eion Stevens, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham An artist whose painting was […]]]>

Warren Feeney’s list of April’s 10 must-see exhibits includes a video installation of the New Brighton coastline, an exhibit dedicated to his support of Women’s Refuge and the potential of the visual arts for well-being and community building.

1. In praise of Eion Stevens, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham

An artist whose painting was often described as that of an “artist’s artist”, Eion Stevens (1952-2021) leaves a legacy of five decades of painting in which the solemnity and humor of the behaviors and circumstances of the humanity are examined and cherished, locating the unsuspecting gallery visitor in a familiar yet enigmatic world. Tribute to Eion Stevens is also Stevens’ inaugural biennial exhibition of selected paintings, their sale supporting Women’s Refuge. April 20 – May 7.

Francis Upritchard, Pano, 2021, rubber and wood.  (Christchurch <a class=Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Provided

Francis Upritchard, Pano, 2021, rubber and wood. (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū)

2. Francis Upritchard, paper, creature, stone, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St.

A first encounter with the sculptures and ceramics of Francis Upritchard might suggest that his handmade objects and paintings are not necessarily works that deliver familiar claims about a contemporary artist who “breaks boundaries”. Yet the more time spent with Upritchard’s work, the more his subjects are not what they initially appear, masking a particular grandeur that continues to underpin Upritchard’s practice and his audience. April 2 – July 24.

Kees Bruin, Doubting Thomas, 2021, oil on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

Provided

Kees Bruin, Doubting Thomas, 2021, oil on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

3. Art Exhibition Open Weekend, 25 artists, 130 works, Windsor Gallery 385 St Asaph Street

During the second weekend of April, the Windsor Gallery holds a two-day exhibition of its represented artists. Among them is the photorealist Kees Bruin, an artist whose practice is arguably the best known internationally. In addition to his involvement with Christianity, surfing, mythology and science, the Old Masters are also among his subjects, Bruin’s favorite artists including Caravaggio, Giorgione and Vermeer. April 9-10.

4. Fiona O'Connor, installation image, photography: Sam Quinn (Ilam Campus Gallery)

Provided

4. Fiona O’Connor, installation image, photography: Sam Quinn (Ilam Campus Gallery)

4. Melissa Macleod, Pig Face, Hare’s Tail and the New Day, Ilam Campus Gallery, School of Fine Arts, on Clyde Rd.

Melissa Macleod, New Brighton resident and 2021 Olivia Spencer Bower Award recipient, has put together a video installation that exudes allegiance and commitment to New Brighton. Yet there is more. Macleod’s contrasting images reveal the pleasure of “having the ocean as a neighbour” and the necessary responsibility associated with such privilege. Until April 29.

5. Installation Photography, Zonta Ashburton Female Art Awards 2022. Left to Right: Louise Palmer, Edwards + Johann, Kate Cairns, Bridgit Anderson, Alice Jones, Rebecca Thomson, Coral Broughton, Sandrine Castel, Floor: Rachel Sleigh (Ashburton Art Gallery)

Provided

5. Installation Photography, Zonta Ashburton Female Art Awards 2022. Left to Right: Louise Palmer, Edwards + Johann, Kate Cairns, Bridgit Anderson, Alice Jones, Rebecca Thomson, Coral Broughton, Sandrine Castel, Floor: Rachel Sleigh (Ashburton Art Gallery)

5. Zonta Ashburton Female Art Prize 2022, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

Performance artist Audrey Baldwin is the recipient of the Zonta Ashburton Female Art Award in 2022. The award continues to go from strength to strength, a message that is reiterated in the accompanying exhibition catalog and the timely selection of Baldwin as her most recent recipient, his interactive/participatory project Art Chemist drawing attention to the importance and potential of the arts for well-being and community development. Until April 24.

Henry Turner, A Million Endings and an Ending, 2022, (City Art Depot)

Provided

Henry Turner, A Million Endings and an Ending, 2022, (City Art Depot)

6. Henry Turner, APGA City Art Depot, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham.

Henry Turner describes the title of his new exhibition, APGA as “unknown”. Yet such an assertion serves as a smokescreen. APGA tackles the territory of found worlds populated by strange, “newly discovered” life forms and geology. Indeed, the exhibition insists that we direct our attention to the experience of Turner’s paintings, each functioning as a raised wall sculpture and a distinct experience of looking through the window. April 12 – May 2.

Simon Edwards, Kekerengu Dreamtime 6, 2022 (Central Art Gallery)

Provided

Simon Edwards, Kekerengu Dreamtime 6, 2022 (Central Art Gallery)

7. 5 year celebration. The Central Art Gallery, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Center for the Arts, 2 Worcester Blvd.

The Central celebrates its 5th anniversary in April and its directors, Richard Laing and Jonathan Smart, celebrate 46 exhibitions during this period with a selection of senior, mid-career and emerging artists and an awareness of historical links with the former galleries of the Center for the Arts. Nineteen artists in the April exhibit range from recent graduate Zara Dolan to famed printmaker/painter Stanley Palmer. April 7 – May 15.

Jacob Yikes, A Temple Full of Chemicals, 2022, metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard.  (Fiksate Gallery)

Provided

Jacob Yikes, A Temple Full of Chemicals, 2022, metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard. (Fiksate Gallery)

8. Jacob Yikes, even in the dark, Fiksate Gallery, 54 Hawdon Street, Sydenham.

Even in the darkness is Jacob Yikes’ most compelling exhibition to date, evident in the shades of paintings that are essentially self-portraits despite and because of the expansive landscapes that invade the gallery. Additionally, the imagery of Even in the darkness makes a connection with the mural Tuam St of the artist, Alice in Wonderland. Certainly work in metallic ink and acrylic paint on cardboard, Even in the darkness is Yikes at its best. April 1-30.

9. Julia Morison, one of 10 works in Omnium Gatherum: 10 Degrees of Separation, 2022, mixed media on board, Photo credit: John Collie.  (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

Provided

9. Julia Morison, one of 10 works in Omnium Gatherum: 10 Degrees of Separation, 2022, mixed media on board, Photo credit: John Collie. (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

9. Julia Morison, 6 (.) 3 degrees apart, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham. Julia Morison’s art is grounded in her engagement with many ideologies and philosophies across time and space, characterized in her painting and sculpture as open visual and theoretical conversations. The good news about 6 (.)3 degrees of separation is its realization in two parts; new works related to 1986 by Morison Vademecum II series and Omnium Gatheruman ongoing project since 2015. April 2 – May 7.

10. Poster: Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫

Provided

10. Poster: Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫

ten. Wai Ching Chan and Tessa Ma’auga, Kāpuia ngā aho 單絲不綫, The Physics Room, 201 Montreal Street, The Toi Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Centre.

The Physics Hall again exceeds expectations with an exhibit that shapes the ties between Aotearoa and the Chinese whakapapa. The lavish installation by artists Wai Ching Chan and Tessa Ma’auga uses traditional Chinese knotting, paper-cutting and weaving techniques with a diverse range of materials, connecting and reinforcing both objects and an idea of ​​an ambition. and a reality. Until April 24.

]]>
The Arts Club presents two spring exhibitions by Ida Applebroog and Reginald Sylvester II https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-arts-club-presents-two-spring-exhibitions-by-ida-applebroog-and-reginald-sylvester-ii/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-arts-club-presents-two-spring-exhibitions-by-ida-applebroog-and-reginald-sylvester-ii/ Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. March 23 – May 15, 2022 The Arts Club London is delighted to announce two exhibitions, Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel bluecurated by Amelie von Wedel and Pernilla Holmes of Wedel Art and presented in the club’s Drawing Room and Ante Room. Ida […]]]>

Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. March 23 – May 15, 2022

The Arts Club London is delighted to announce two exhibitions, Ida Applebroog: Birds and Reginald Sylvester II: feel bluecurated by Amelie von Wedel and Pernilla Holmes of Wedel Art and presented in the club’s Drawing Room and Ante Room.

Ida Applebroog: Birds

The Arts Club presents an exhibition by 92-year-old American artist Ida Applebroog, focusing on works from the recent Angry Birds of America series. A pioneer of the American and international feminist movement since the 1970s, the exhibition illustrates Applebroog’s extraordinary use of animal portraiture as a means of political investigation and critique.

Applebroog has challenged multiple artistic mediums to address themes of politics, power, mass media and sexuality for over six decades. In 2016 she developed an interest in ornithology, in particular the work of artist and ornithologist John James Audubon (1785 – 1851) who brought art and nature together. Applebroog began collecting taxidermy birds and related books, and through this inspiration continued to produce his own designs and models in plaster and paint.

The Arts Club selection offers a solid insight into the Angry Birds of America series, which Applebroog began directing in 2016. Created in a year that also saw the start of Donald J. Trump’s US presidency, an explosion of nationalism and anti-immigration policies, and the rise of #MeToo movement, the works echo the broader social turmoil of the moment. Depicting bird carcasses, Applebroog evokes the connection between beauty and violence in the natural and man-made worlds. At the same time, she immortalizes these creatures through her works, bringing their lives back into view. In doing so, Applebroog forms a metaphor for contemporary political life in America and a powerful call to action.

The Arts Club exhibition coincides with the artist’s major solo exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Somerset. The Arts Club and Wedel Art thank the artist, his studio team and Hauser & Wirth for their enthusiasm and for the great works that make up this exhibition.

See also

Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue

    Left: Reginald Sylvester II, Wandering Star, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in.  Right: Reginald Sylvester II, Strangers, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in.  © Reginald Sylvester II.  Images courtesy of the artist and Maximillian William, London.  Photography: Daniel Greer.

Left: Reginald Sylvester II, Wandering Star, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in. Right: Reginald Sylvester II, Strangers, 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 in. © Reginald Sylvester II. Images courtesy of the artist and Maximillian William, London. Photography: Daniel Greer.

The Arts Club is delighted to announce an exhibition of paintings by American artist Reginald Sylvester II: feel blue. A rising star in international contemporary art, Sylvester’s radical abstract works are reminiscent of artists like Elaine de Kooning and Joan Mitchell, but with a frenetic energy and singular pictorial vocabulary that places him entirely in the present.

Sylvester’s works are informed by a range of experiences and research that belie his young age. His sensibility draws on the sense of media acquired from his time as a graphic designer, an in-depth knowledge of contemporary fashion and his historical grounding in abstract expressionist practices. Sylvester conceptualizes painting as a matter of finding, rather than spontaneously generating images, working in the realms that oscillate between the material and the spiritual. Its surfaces are a multi-layered sum of paint, each layer offering a story, a philosophy and a connection to parts of Sylvester’s biography, while also inviting the viewer to experience the paintings through their own subjective point of view.

Focusing on Sylvester’s recent blue paintings, feel blue sees a departure from its usual warmer palette in favor of cooler tones, inspired by Portishead’s 1994 avant-garde trip-hop album Dummy. The blue background of the painting recalls the iconic album cover, which features lead singer Beth Gibbons imposed on a cobalt blue background. Among Sylvester’s blues, brilliant whites, browns and purples are bursts of red that combine to create a lively and moving painting. On the top and bottom edges of the canvas, the abstract strokes have been covered with a linear wash of paint, reinforcing the geometry of the picture plane. More organic washes of sky and navy blue cascade throughout the piece, complementing the gestural strokes.

The Arts Club and Wedel Art are extremely grateful to Reginald Sylvester II for producing and exhibiting these tremendous works, and for the invaluable assistance of his Maximillian William Gallery, London.

]]>
Murals, art galleries and new exhibitions to discover this spring https://marlborough-monaco.com/murals-art-galleries-and-new-exhibitions-to-discover-this-spring/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:03:44 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/murals-art-galleries-and-new-exhibitions-to-discover-this-spring/ Art by Anthea Hamilton at the 58th International Art Biennale on May 07, 2019 in Venice, Italy. Luca Zanon/Awakening/Getty Images The weather in New York is notoriously unpredictable between February and April (and indeed, all the time), but as soon as the sun breaks through the clouds and the temperature starts to climb, all bets […]]]>
Art by Anthea Hamilton at the 58th International Art Biennale on May 07, 2019 in Venice, Italy. Luca Zanon/Awakening/Getty Images

The weather in New York is notoriously unpredictable between February and April (and indeed, all the time), but as soon as the sun breaks through the clouds and the temperature starts to climb, all bets are off: it’s time to hop in the galleries, socialize and throw in a hot take or two. The warm evenings are coming and the gallery halls are adorned with stimulating works by exciting talents. You can stroll through Tribeca or take a left at Citi Field to head to the Queens Museum, where concurrent exhibits by Suzanne Lacy, Christine Sun Kim, and Stephanie Dinkins are about to launch.

Broadway Gallery — Jo Nigoghossian, March 31 – April 30

TriBeCa’s newly hatched Broadway Gallery has already made a name for itself under the leadership of Pascal Spengemann, former vice-president of the struggling Marlborough Gallery, but let’s not get bogged down in the hubbub of the industry. On March 31, Broadway launches an exhibition highlighting British-American artist Jo Nigoghossian, a 2009 graduate of Yale School of Art, whose gnarled sculptural works shimmer with aggressive neon. Nigoghossian’s oil paintings, however, are the focus of the Broadway show, and the offerings ooze the menace of late capitalism. In To throw (2020), a rocket with an uncertain future springs from its bearings surrounded by acrid black smoke; it sounds like Elon Musk’s worst nightmare. Escape Cruisemeanwhile, evokes the equally fascinating and terrifying boat carrying the titular characters of Taken away as if by magic.

O’Flaherty’s – Anthea Hamilton, March 31

O’Flaherty’s has just completed a murderous tribute to the warped mind of Ashley Bickerton, an 1980s New York neo-minimalist who abandoned the Big Apple for Bali in 1993 and never looked back. Next up is Anthea Hamilton, a Turner Prize shortlisted artist whose multiple practices include curatorial, sculpture and immersive installations. “The things I produce are often physically unstable – even based on a precarious balance – because I am interested in the image of a solution or the image of a question, or the way in which one begs the question,” Hamilton told the artist, writer and musician. Ross Simonini in November. “I feel like the work I do is just about publicizing the questions that pop into my head, rather than the solutions.”

Artist Christine Sun Kim’s new mural, ‘Time Owes Me Rest Again’ (2022), at the Queens Museum. Queen’s Museum

Queens Museum — Stephanie Dinkins, Suzanne Lacy and Christine Sun Kim, March 13

On March 13, the Queens Museum is simultaneously launching three separate exhibitions. “Stephanie Dinkins: On Love and Data” focuses on the artist’s use of artificial intelligence, techno, video and other mediums to advance ideas such as those expressed in her manifesto of 2020 Afro-nowism. “The Medium Isn’t the Only Message” covers decades of work by performance artist and activist Suzanne Lacy, who has always been oriented towards overturning cultural norms and challenging conventional modes of expression. Finally, “Time Owes Me Rest Again”, artist Christine Sun Kim’s mural tribute to ASL communication which also evokes Pop Art, will remain on display at the museum until January 2023.

A work by Hannah Taurins currently on display at Theta. Courtesy of Theta

Theta – Hannah Taurins, “Cover Girl,” February 23 – March 26

We can’t say enough good things about Theta, Jordan Barse’s less than a year old Tribeca gallery. Barse performed intimate, carefully curated shows consecutively; right now, you can check out Hannah Taurins: “Cover Girl,” which runs until March 26. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition, and Taurins renders female figures in pencil and paint, sometimes focusing on a pair of shiny patterned tights or the provocative gaze of a bare-breasted woman seen from afar. downstairs.

Cristine Brache’s work at Anonymous. anonymous gallery

Anonymous — Cristine Brache, “Bermuda Triangle”, February 24 – April 2

Artist Cristine Brache was raised strictly Catholic and has long harbored ambitions to become a nun. Her parents’ divorce shocked her: “I thought divorce defied the laws of physics, like unbreakable glass,” Brache wrote. “I went down a spiral wondering if something was real. I even tried to invoke satan, to prove that God existed. But Satan never came and my walls of perception crumbled along with my belief into a Christian god.”Bermuda Triangle” is an excavation of Brache’s crisis of faith.In the center of the Anonymous gallery is an inflatable pool, and on the water the artist projected a Super 8 film of a kissing couple transitioning to mouth-to-mouth sequences.Still images of the scenes line the walls, hemming the viewer with the suggestion that a cruel summer should follow spring.

Museum murals, gallery reflections and intimate exhibitions to discover this spring

]]>
10 exhibitions you can’t miss in Canterbury in March https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-you-cant-miss-in-canterbury-in-march/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/10-exhibitions-you-cant-miss-in-canterbury-in-march/ Highlights of the Canterbury arts calendar in March include an exhibition of mythical and medieval figures in embroidery and a video insight into the lives of local immigrants. Provided SwiftMantis, Cat Mural, photograph courtesy of the artist (Flare Street Art Festival, SALT district) 1. The Flare Street Art Festival, SALT District, Ōtautahi. Artists, events and […]]]>

Highlights of the Canterbury arts calendar in March include an exhibition of mythical and medieval figures in embroidery and a video insight into the lives of local immigrants.

SwiftMantis, Cat Mural, photograph courtesy of the artist (Flare Street Art Festival, SALT district)

Provided

SwiftMantis, Cat Mural, photograph courtesy of the artist (Flare Street Art Festival, SALT district)

1. The Flare Street Art Festival, SALT District, Ōtautahi. Artists, events and places: https://flare.nz/ and @flarestreetartfestival.

Flare is a new street art mural festival for the city developed by ARCC (business leaders collectively identified as: Action Reaction Central Christchurch). Flare features local street artists, including DTR team Ikarus and Wongi ‘Freak’ Wilson and guest artists that include Elliot Francis Stewart, Kell Sunshine and Koryu, with artist/writer Reuben Woods also drawing attention to SwiftMantis’ and his massive feline paintings which gained international acclaim. March 2-12

Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden, drone photography, 2020, (Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden)

./Thing

Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden, drone photography, 2020, (Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden)

2. Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden Annual Sculpture Event, 1/199 Cossars Road, Tai Tapu.

Annabel Menzies-Joyce and Peter Joyce’s spacious estate garden and park are open for three weekends in March. An annual public event since 2014, its commitment to contemporary art and the regeneration of native species make it an all-inclusive experience. Permanent artworks are installed with new works by senior and emerging artists working with a diversity of materials including bronze, linen, bran and more. Open Saturdays and Sundays: March 5-6, 12-13 and 19-20, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission: $10 per visitor, free for children under 16.

Jacquelyn Greenbank, As good as ten mothers, 2020, carved wooden bowling ball with harakeke link.  (<a class=Ashburton Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Provided

Jacquelyn Greenbank, As good as ten mothers, 2020, carved wooden bowling ball with harakeke link. (Ashburton Art Gallery)

3. The Zonta Ashburton Female Art Awards, (ZAFAA) Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

Established in 2017, the ZAFAA is an annual art award that has garnered national attention. Consisting of a top award for practicing female artists and its Younger Generation award for artists between the ages of 16 and 20, it recognizes the significant contribution of female visual artists to contemporary arts practice in Aotearoa. The judges in 2022 are artist Julia Morison, curator Imogen Stockwell and artist/educator Hannah Joynt. March 19-April 24

Christiane Shortel, The scapegoat, 2022, embroidery thread on cotton, lycra and felt (City Art Depot)

Provided

Christiane Shortel, The scapegoat, 2022, embroidery thread on cotton, lycra and felt (City Art Depot)

4. Christiane Shortel, as in the fading realm/the first spillCity Art Depot, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham.

Presenting her first solo exhibition in 2021 at City Art Depot with a series of extraordinary works on paper, the current exhibition by Christiane Shortel is also a surprise, the artist turning to embroidery, subjects of her new works, figures mythical and medieval, serving as symbols and metaphors to reveal the persistent, curious and restless nature of human behavior. February 15-March 7

Peter Hawkesby, White Demolition Tick, 2019 and Demolition Tick, 2019. (CoCA Toi Moroki)

Provided

Peter Hawkesby, White Demolition Tick, 2019 and Demolition Tick, 2019. (CoCA Toi Moroki)

5. Tender Brick: The Material of Peter Hawkesby’s Epiphanies. CoCA Toi Moroki, 66 Gloucester St.

CoCA Toi Moroki opens its latest program of exhibitions in association with Objectspace, with the relationship finally seeing CoCA deliver its most cohesive annual program of exhibitions since reopening in 2016. The finale with Objectspace consists of two standout exhibitions: that of Peter Hawkesby soft brick and Judy Darragh Competitive plastics, Hawkesby’s finely hand-set works in clay, possessing a striking presence and personality. February 26-May 7

Chloe Summerfield, Untitled XIX, 2022 oil on canvas with pine frame (Chambers Gallery)

Provided

Chloe Summerfield, Untitled XIX, 2022 oil on canvas with pine frame (Chambers Gallery)

6. Chloe Summerhayes, EarthenChambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham.

Chloe Summerhayes holds her first solo exhibition at Ōtautahi, an impressive series of contemporary paintings that possess the spirit of 17th century Baroque painting in their grand gestures and marks, complemented by abstract forms that push and pull against the boundaries of the plane of the image. Earthen is a pictorial experience, the gallery visitor standing in the midst of fluctuating abstract and figurative images. March 2-19.

Janneth Gil, Oladeinde Rashidad Morenike of Nigeria and her daughters, Elizabeth, Esther and Emmanuella, 2021, photograph (Turanga)

Provided

Janneth Gil, Oladeinde Rashidad Morenike of Nigeria and her daughters, Elizabeth, Esther and Emmanuella, 2021, photograph (Turanga)

7. Immigrant journey: He Hononga Connection, ground floor, Tūranga Library, 60 Cathedral Square.

best known for The darkness in the lighta collaborative project with the Muslim community, photographer Janneth Gil plays a central role as a participating artist in Immigrant journeya project with his photographs and the videos of John Sellwood. Immigrant journey highlights and seeks to share the opportunity for Ōtautahi residents to step into the lives of local immigrants in 24 videos of families and individuals. March 10-May 15

Exhibitions by Warren Feeney in Canterbury in March: 8. Kate Cairns, Rut, 2022l oil on panel (Rangiora Chamber Gallery)

Provided

Exhibitions by Warren Feeney in Canterbury in March: 8. Kate Cairns, Rut, 2022l oil on panel (Rangiora Chamber Gallery)

8. Kate Cairns, green like grassRangiora bedroom gallery.

Life on the farm has never seemed so strange. Mid-Canterbury artist Kate Cairns lives and works with her husband and four primary school children in Barnhill, North Canterbury. In green like grass the given familiarity of family, cattle grazing, children and home is glued and reassembled in all its finery to reincarnate as hay as the sun shines an experience unlike any other, revealed as if for the very first time. March 6-31.

Exhibitions by Warren Feeney in Canterbury in March: 9. Polly Gilroy, Within reach, 2021, silk and chiffon on pine, (PGgallery192)

Provided

Exhibitions by Warren Feeney in Canterbury in March: 9. Polly Gilroy, Within reach, 2021, silk and chiffon on pine, (PGgallery192)

9. Polly Gilroy, tracksPGgallery192, 192 Bealey Ave.

Working with transparent silk and chiffon, Polly Gilroy refines and expands the possibilities of contemporary painting, creating transparent geometric objects that, in their economy of form, are both concise and poignant. In tracks, Gilroy takes her imagery beyond the framed format of traditional painting in a six-piece installation in the gallery that she says continues her exploration of light, while now replicating shadows cast on the walls. March 15-April 9

Warren Feeney exhibitions in Canterbury in March: 10. Andrea Daly, size 21 Bird necklace, leather, glass beads, peridot, feathers, bone, synthetic hair (The National)

Provided

Warren Feeney exhibitions in Canterbury in March: 10. Andrea Daly, size 21 Bird necklace, leather, glass beads, peridot, feathers, bone, synthetic hair (The National)

ten. Andrea Daly, green birdThe National, 249 Moorhouse Ave.

green bird is an exhibition-investigation, bringing together four years of work by Andrea Daly. If jewels are certainties, Daly’s jewels do something else. She comments, “Sometimes a job is full of joy and beginnings and yet that same job the next day can carry the weight of worry and loss. There are many strands in this exhibit, but the threads seem to weave together and the different ideas, fluttering lightly, somehow speak to each other. March 9-April 9

]]>
Art exhibitions to discover in KL and PJ in March 2022 https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-exhibitions-to-discover-in-kl-and-pj-in-march-2022/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/art-exhibitions-to-discover-in-kl-and-pj-in-march-2022/ KL and PJ are home to some of the best art galleries and exhibitions in the country, both new and established. Looking for something fun and inspiring to do this weekend? Check out these stimulating art exhibitions in the city throughout March 2022. Dia Guild fans will want to add the fashion platform exhibition to […]]]>

KL and PJ are home to some of the best art galleries and exhibitions in the country, both new and established. Looking for something fun and inspiring to do this weekend? Check out these stimulating art exhibitions in the city throughout March 2022.

Dia Guild fans will want to add the fashion platform exhibition to their calendar. Titled “Recrafting Stories: A Decolonial Pursuit,” guests will learn about famous Southeast Asian artists and designers through their beautiful creations.

In conjunction with International Women’s Day, the digital art gallery features 8 female artists in #BreaktheBias: Immersive Digital Art Exhibition. At GMBB, discover and learn about the Mah Meri tribe by taking a closer look at Ari Muyang (ancestor festival).

Here is a list of some of the best art exhibitions to visit in March 2022 in KL and PJ:

Recrafting Stories: A Decolonial Pursuit at Small Shifting Space, KL

Open now until March 20.

Dia Guild pays homage to the decolonial journeys of famous Southeast Asian artists and designers through their crafts, music and literature. Divided into three parts, the exhibition will explore “How did we get here? in the first week, “Where are we now?” in the second week and finally, “Where are we going?” in the third week.

So gather your friends and head to Small Shifting Space discovering beautiful pieces from Neil Felipp from the Philippines, Garden of Desire from Cambodia, TALEE Studio from Malaysia and Argent Studio from Indonesia. The expo will also feature weekend activities by local creatives to educate guests about Southeast Asia’s creative industry.

#BreaktheBias: Immersive Digital Art Exhibition, PJ

If you’re interested in the emerging world of digital art, check out the immersive exhibition for International Women’s Day at the Digital Art Gallery. With 8 pioneering female artists, you will discover their vision of a world without prejudice, stereotypes, discrimination and a celebration of all our individual identities.

The exhibition features eight local female digital artists active in NFTs: Arda Baha, Gray Z, LakarUmbi, Jem Kosmos, Nabihah Haiyee, Oli, Jasma and Pamela Tan. All works featured in Filamen’s virtual gallery are also co-curated by Fizah Rahim of Machineast. All works are also available for viewing and purchase here.

Selamat Ari Muyang at Mah Meri at GMBB KL

In collaboration with Gerimis Malaysia, go to GMBB and learn more about Mah Meri and Ari Muyang. Fun fact: The Mah Meri are one of the 19 Orang Asli tribes in Malaysia. In light of the Ari Muyang celebration, you can learn about the Mah Meri tradition and their woven creature decorations. As stated by GMBB, these creatures are examples of how the tribe takes inspiration from their surroundings and natural environments.

catharsis by Ivan Lam at the Wei-Ling Gallery

From March 1 to April 16, 2022. 2nd Floor, Wei-Ling Gallery Annex @ Brickfields

Malaysian contemporary artist Ivan Lam presents ‘Catharsis’ as his most personal and vital series to date. The exhibition consists of five large-panel paintings focusing on his experience, understanding and acceptance of physical pain. Each painting depicts an anatomical drawing of a part of the body – the skull, inner ear, pelvis, skin and heart – that has caused pain in the past, with color codes from nervous systems to Latin names of various organs.

Stay connected for more news.

Main image credit: Vincent Tantardini on Unsplash

This article was first published on Lifestyle Asia Kuala Lumpur

]]>
Your place: Koru on Devon exhibitions https://marlborough-monaco.com/your-place-koru-on-devon-exhibitions/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/your-place-koru-on-devon-exhibitions/ VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff Jodi Naik, 25, is an Auckland-born artist who now lives in Taranaki. She describes her style as abstract patterns and is inspired by nature, the freshness of our natural environment, animals and anything that represents freedom. Naik is drawn to lights and anything that sparkles and shines and incorporates this into […]]]>
Jodi Naik, 25, is an Auckland-born artist who now lives in Taranaki.  She describes her style as abstract patterns and is inspired by nature, the freshness of our natural environment, animals and anything that represents freedom.  Naik is drawn to lights and anything that sparkles and shines and incorporates this into her pieces.  This exhibition is called Finding the Light.

VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff

Jodi Naik, 25, is an Auckland-born artist who now lives in Taranaki. She describes her style as abstract patterns and is inspired by nature, the freshness of our natural environment, animals and anything that represents freedom. Naik is drawn to lights and anything that sparkles and shines and incorporates this into her pieces. This exhibition is called Finding the Light.

The Koru on Devon art gallery is opening two new exhibitions this Friday, one by Christian Nicolson and the other by Jodi Naik.

Taranaki Daily News photographer vanessa laurie went to see some of the works, which included a visit to New Plymouth’s back deck.

Christian Nicolson is a surfer, artist and filmmaker from Auckland.  He has been painting full time for 16 years and is organizing this exhibition outside of Auckland.  The region's rugged coastline features in some of the paintings.  Nicolson describes her style as expressive, quirky, dramatic and colorful.

VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff

Christian Nicolson is a surfer, artist and filmmaker from Auckland. He has been painting full time for 16 years and is organizing this exhibition outside of Auckland. The region’s rugged coastline features in some of the paintings. Nicolson describes her style as expressive, quirky, dramatic and colorful.

Prior to his gallery exhibition, Nicolson installed some of his sculptures at Back Beach in New Plymouth.  His dog sculptures are called Where's Mummy.  These were originally for the Sculptures on Shore exhibition in Auckland, but due to Covid-19 it was cancelled.  However, it can be viewed online.

VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff

Prior to his gallery exhibition, Nicolson installed some of his sculptures at Back Beach in New Plymouth. His dog sculptures are called Where’s Mummy. These were originally for the Sculptures on Shore exhibition in Auckland, but due to Covid-19 it was cancelled. However, it can be viewed online.

The sculptures, painted in the expressive style of Nicholson, include several breeds of dogs.

VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff

The sculptures, painted in the expressive style of Nicholson, include several breeds of dogs.

]]>
MFA Boston kicks off spring with 2 powerful exhibitions: “Philip Guston: Now” and “Turner’s… https://marlborough-monaco.com/mfa-boston-kicks-off-spring-with-2-powerful-exhibitions-philip-guston-now-and-turners/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 21:52:51 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/mfa-boston-kicks-off-spring-with-2-powerful-exhibitions-philip-guston-now-and-turners/ Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On) by Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851) 1840. Oil on canvas, 90.8 x 122.6 cm (35 3/4 x 48 1/ 4 in.) Museum of Fine Arts, Boston This spring, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is highlighting two different game-changing artists, JMW Turner […]]]>
Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On) by Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851) 1840. Oil on canvas, 90.8 x 122.6 cm (35 3/4 x 48 1/ 4 in.) Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

This spring, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is highlighting two different game-changing artists, JMW Turner and Philip Guston, who responded to their own tumultuous times with innovative artistic visions.

One of Britain’s greatest artists, JMW Turner (1775-1851) lived and worked at the height of the Industrial Revolution, when steam replaced sailing, machinery replaced labor and wars, political unrest and social reform transformed society. At the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, from March 27 to July 10, 2022, the exhibition Turner’s Modern World will explore how this artist, more than any of his contemporaries, embraced these changes and developed an innovative style of painting to better capture this new world.

(detail) Philip Guston, Painting, Smoking, Eating, 1973, oil on canvas, overall: 196.85 x 262.89 cm (77 1/2 x 103 1/2 in.) Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam © The Estate of Philip Guston

This landmark exhibition brings together over 100 of Turner’s paintings, watercolours, drawings and sketchbooks, including Tate Britain’s Snowstorm: Hannibal and his army crossing the Alps (1812), The burning of the House of Lords and Commons, October 16, 1834 (1835) from the Cleveland Museum of Art and the MFA Slave ship (1840). These vivid and dramatic compositions demonstrate Turner’s commitment to depicting the major events and developments of his time, from technological advances to causes such as abolition and political reform. Turner’s Modern World is organized by Tate Britain in association with the Kimbell Art Museum and the MFA.

Also coming to the MFA (May 1 to Sept. 11, 2022), Philippe Guston: Now is a traveling exhibit that sparked controversy when dates were initially pushed back four years. One of America’s greatest modern painters, Philip Guston (1913-1980) defies easy categorization. His winding 50-year career, in which sensitive abstractions gave way to large comic-book canvases populated by lumpy, sometimes tortured characters and mysterious personal symbols, has garnered both admiration and controversy.

This major exhibition, organized by the MFA, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston and the Tate Modern in London, is the first retrospective of Guston’s work in nearly 20 years. The selection of approximately 90 paintings and 30 drawings from public and private collections features well-known works as well as others rarely seen. Highlights include paintings from the 1930s that have never been on public display; the largest collection of paintings from Guston’s groundbreaking Marlborough Gallery exhibition in 1970; a dazzling range of small panel paintings made from 1968 to 1972 as he developed his new vocabulary of hooded heads, books, bricks and shoes; and a powerful selection of large, often apocalyptic paintings from the late 1970s that form the artist’s last major artistic statement.

]]>
The top 5 art exhibitions to see in Mayfair and Fitzrovia https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-5-art-exhibitions-to-see-in-mayfair-and-fitzrovia/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 09:11:14 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/the-top-5-art-exhibitions-to-see-in-mayfair-and-fitzrovia/ Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic picks his favorite exhibitions to see this month – this time they’re all close together in Mayfair or Fitzrovia. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more shows should check out last week’s top 5 where all remain open. Marcus Jansen: […]]]>

Tabish Khan the @LondonArtCritic picks his favorite exhibitions to see this month – this time they’re all close together in Mayfair or Fitzrovia. Each comes with a concise review to help you decide if it’s for you. Those looking for more shows should check out last week’s top 5 where all remain open.

Marcus Jansen: Victims and victors @ Almine Rech
Reflecting both his time in the armed forces and hot topics in contemporary society, Marcus Jansen’s “faceless” paintings are powerful portraits. Referencing how we only celebrate the victors, the silence of women, the demolition of monuments and the continued invasion of privacy in this hard-hitting political painting spectacle. Until February 19.

Glen Baxter: Inexpicably Vermillion @ Flowers, Cork Street
We all need a fun exhibit at the start of the year and this one at Glen Baxter delivers. His cartoon-like designs shed light on art and art history in creative ways, from surreal to clever puns. One that is guaranteed to make you smile. Until February 19.

BongSu Park & ​​Shuster & Moseley @ Rosenfeld Gallery
Light refracts, shimmers and shifts perceptions in a show that combines the work of two very different artists who work well together. Shuster and Moseley’s works are beautifully done in glass and the light that shines through them creates a dramatic effect on the walls around them. While BongSu Park’s work in the dark is equally ethereal in dream-based work. Until February 13.

Roy DeCarava: Selected Works @ David Zwirner
There is so much beauty and richness in these black and white photographs by Roy DeCarava. The subtle shadow differences make people’s features barely visible and buildings look like paintings. It is a photograph so subtle that it is spellbinding. Until February 19.

Francis Bacon: Selected Graphics @ Marlborough London
The Bacon exhibition at the Royal Academy is the talk of the town, but there is also another Bacon exhibition around the corner in Marlborough. The human figure twists and contorts in these fantastic prints, based on his paintings – including some of his phenomenal triptychs and a superb lithograph of Pope Innocent. Until February 26.

Image Roy DeCarava: © The Estate of Roy DeCarava. All rights reserved. Courtesy of David Zwirner. All other images are copyright of the artist/artist’s estate and gallery.

Categories

Keywords

Author

Tabish Khan

Art critic for FAD and Londonist. Visit as many exhibitions as possible and write reviews, opinion pieces and a weekly top 5 for FAD.

For the first time in a decade, a major retrospective of paintings by 20th century master Francis Bacon (1909-1992) is presented in London.

Almine Rech London presents his first personal exhibition of American artist Marcus Jansen. It will be that of Marcus Jansen […]

American artist Sally Mann is the winner of the 9th cycle of the Prix Pictet, the world prize for photography and sustainability. Sally Mann will receive a cash prize of 100,000 Swiss francs (£82,000, $109,000).

Marlborough will feature Maggi Hambling in her long-awaited first exhibition in New York. Hambling has been a prominent and controversial figure in the UK for over fifty years and will present here a significant body of work from the past decade.

]]>
29 art exhibitions we can’t wait to see this year https://marlborough-monaco.com/29-art-exhibitions-we-cant-wait-to-see-this-year/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/29-art-exhibitions-we-cant-wait-to-see-this-year/ Despite masking, vaccine requirements and changed opening hours, the gallery in 2022 looks, at least for now, pretty much what it did before, with an exciting slate of shows set to continue. open throughout the year. Here we round up just a few of those we’re most looking forward to seeing – from new commissions […]]]>

Despite masking, vaccine requirements and changed opening hours, the gallery in 2022 looks, at least for now, pretty much what it did before, with an exciting slate of shows set to continue. open throughout the year. Here we round up just a few of those we’re most looking forward to seeing – from new commissions to sprawling retrospectives and group shows to art fairs, in New York, Los Angeles, London, Venice and beyond.

Overlooked in the canon of art history, Mason was a leader of the abstract art boys’ club in the New York art world from the 1930s through the 1960s. Ad Reinhardt said at the beginning of the 1960s that “without Alice Trumbull Mason, we [the abstract painters] would not be here, nor in such a force. Mason also stars in The Whitney’s all-female group show, “Labyrinth of Forms: Women and Abstraction, 1930–1950,” on view through March. Until January 22.

Featuring paintings, sculptures and works on paper from 1978 to 2018 (Spalletti died in 2019), “Ettore Spalletti” examines the general themes of the artist’s practice. Among them, the light moved and changed throughout the day in Cappelle sul Tavo, the small town on Italy’s east coast where he lived and worked for more than 60 years. Until March 5.

Curated by Thelma Golden (director and chief curator of the Studio Museum in Harlem) and Legacy Russell (executive director and chief curator of The Kitchen), “Projects: Kahlil Robert Irving” wraps the gallery space in a backdrop of site-specific display of two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital works dealing with themes of “black life, death, remembrance, celebration, and survival.” Until May 1.

“His Mark” is Nauman’s new six-channel 3D video installation of his “X-signing fingers and hands”. The inspiration came from his grandson Milo’s history textbook, where Nauman found a copy of a treaty signed by the Canadian government depicting the Queen of England and Chief of the Blackfoot Indian Band – who signed his name in X. From January 13 to March 12.

Unknown photographer. Toni Morrison in China, 1984.

Photo: Courtesy of Princeton University Library (Toni Morrison Papers, Manuscripts Division, Special Collections, Princeton University Library).

Curated by author and critic Hilton Als, this exciting group exhibition pays homage to the work and cultural significance of writer Toni Morrison (1931-2019), adding “visual elements that italicize the beauty and the audacity of his work”. Featured artists include Garrett Bradley, Félix Gonzalez-Torres, Kerry James Marshall, Julie Mehretu, Walter Price, Amy Sillman and James Van Der Zee. Opening on January 20.

Hannah Traore’s gallery opened this month on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, with a mission to celebrate artists “historically marginalized from the mainstream narrative.” The first two exhibitions do just that: “Hues” is a love letter to artists of color working with color, while “Mi Casa Su Casa”, a group exhibition curated by Hassan Hajjaj and Meriem Yin , will showcase, in salon style, some of the greatest Moroccan artists working today. Both open January 20.

At 52 Walker, the gallery space programmed and directed by David Zwirner’s director, Ebony L. Haynes, “Nikita Gale: End of Subject” showcases Gale’s innovative work of light, movement and sound, exploring “the tacit agreement between the audience and the materials that enable the act of viewing and experiencing. Opening on January 21.

A man of commanding presence, ch. 1700-30. Attributed to the Master at the Court of Mankot. Opaque pigments on paper, red border, with black inner ruler and white inner and outer rulers.

Courtesy of Luhring Augustin

]]>
Stylish exhibitions to visit this summer https://marlborough-monaco.com/stylish-exhibitions-to-visit-this-summer/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/stylish-exhibitions-to-visit-this-summer/ From beach breaks to scenic day hikes, if you find yourself in the hustle and bustle of the city why not take in some of these stylish exhibits on display across the country. From couture-collecting farmers and the ‘Big Eighties Energy’, to fashion revolutionaries and Swedish mystics commanded by the great beyond, treat yourself to […]]]>

From beach breaks to scenic day hikes, if you find yourself in the hustle and bustle of the city why not take in some of these stylish exhibits on display across the country.

From couture-collecting farmers and the ‘Big Eighties Energy’, to fashion revolutionaries and Swedish mystics commanded by the great beyond, treat yourself to a bit of culture this summer and maybe learn something new.

A major exhibition on British designer Mary Quant has opened at the Auckland <a class=Art Gallery, London’s V&A.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Auckland Art Gallery/Fourni

A major exhibition on British designer Mary Quant has opened at the Auckland Art Gallery, London’s V&A.

Mary Quant: Fashion Revolutionary, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

Subversive, inventive and revolutionary, legendary fashion designer Mary Quant helped define the style of the “swinging sixties”. Credited with inventing some of the most iconic looks of the decade – namely the mini skirt, hot pants and thin ribbed sweater (said to have been inspired by trying on a children’s sweater) – Quant’s irreverent yet highly wearable designs were quickly embraced by liberated women of the time, encouraging a new era of feminism.

A retail pioneer, Quant’s first store, ‘Bazaar’ on London’s famous King’s Road, offered a truly unique shopping experience. Extended opening hours, loud music and free drinks drew crowds of young women eager for something different from the formal settings and mature style of the couturiers and mainstream stores. Quant’s business savvy led her to transform her brand into a wholesale business, making designer fashion accessible to working women around the world and cementing her position as the ultimate tastemaker of her time.

Here from the famous V&A museum in London, Mary Quant: fashion revolutionary is open at Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki this summer. The exhibition brings together more than 120 garments as well as accessories, cosmetics, sketches and photographs, to offer an in-depth look at the pioneering fashion icon who toppled the dominance of luxury couture by harnessing the spirit youth of the 60s and embracing new techniques of mass production, thus empowering the modern woman.

DETAILS: December 10 to March 13, 2022, adult admission $24.50. For more information, click here.

READ MORE:
* Images of the cosmos to accompany the Hilma af Klint exhibition
* Ngāti chief Whātua Ōrākei appointed deputy director of Auckland Art Gallery
* The mayor of Wellington is concerned about the restructuring of the City Gallery
* Hilma af Klint will be presented in New Zealand for the first time

Eden Hore: Haute couture/High Country, The Dowse

Eden Hore was an upland farmer from the small town of Naseby in central Otago. Admired for his agricultural prowess, Hore was also known for his eclectic taste and entrepreneurial spirit. He was the first to import and breed American miniature horses, and also owned a menagerie of exotic animals, including bison, peacocks, and Himalayan Tahr. And while you’d expect a farmer to be interested in animals, Hore had another great passion: dropping beautiful fashion. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s he amassed an enviable collection of avant-garde haute couture clothing by leading local designers of the time, including Vinka Lucas, who also produced clothing for Saudi royalty, and prolific bridal wear designer Kevin Berkahn. Hore’s vintage tailoring collection is considered one of Australasia’s largest and is valued at over $80,000.

Eden Hore: Haute Couture/High Country, presented at The Dowse this summer, brings together some of the most glamorous dresses from the Hore collection and positions them against stunning landscapes in central Otago, recreating the connection between farmer and fashion. Captured by renowned New Zealand photographer Derek Henderson, the series of photographs celebrates the best our country has to offer: breathtaking landscapes, passionate individuals and extraordinary creative talents. The exhibition is also part of the 2022 New Zealand Arts Festival.

DETAILS: from December 4 to March 20, 2022, free admission. For more information, click here.

Robert Muldoon as hamburger, artist unknown, part of Face Time: Portraits from the 1980s exhibition at New Zealand Portrait Gallery Te PÅ«kenga Whakaata

Provided

Robert Muldoon as hamburger, artist unknown, part of Face Time: Portraits from the 1980s exhibition at New Zealand Portrait Gallery Te PÅ«kenga Whakaata

Face Time: Portraits from the 1980s, New Zealand Portrait Gallery Te Pukenga Whakaata

Face Time: Portraits from the 1980s is all about that ‘Big Eighties Energy’, as curator Milly Mitchell-Anyon puts it. Think big hair and bold fashion wrapped up in a coming-of-age tale.

The 1980s were a time of immense upheaval for Aotearoa as the nation underwent seismic shifts that forever changed its social, political and economic landscape. Muldoon, the 1981 Springbok Tour protests, Rogernomics and gay rights reform are just a few of the major events that defined and redefined the decade.

face time talks about these pivotal moments in our country’s history and celebrates the energy, color and unapologetic grimace synonymous with the 80s.

The exhibition showcases works in a wide range of mediums, including photography, ceramics, books, t-shirts, sculpture and painting, from major public and private art collections, with artists represented such as Mary McIntyre, Pat Hanly, Deborah Bustin, Jeffery Harris, Trevor Moffitt, Tony Fomison, Michael Illingworth and Fiona Clark.

DETAILS: November 25 to February 13, 2022, free admission. For more information, click here.

Hilma af Klint, The Ten Largest, 1907. Photo courtesy of Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Moderna Museet/Supplied

Hilma af Klint, The Ten Largest, 1907. Photo courtesy of Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Hilma af Klint: The Secret Paintings, City Gallery Wellington Te Whare Toi

This summer, at the City Gallery Wellington, an exhibition of monumental works by the Swedish artist-mystic Hilma af Klint. Working at the turn of the 20th century, af Klint developed an entirely new artistic style, the rediscovery of which radically challenges the male-centric chronologies of modern art history. Considered one of the first examples of abstract art, his works, created as early as 1906, predate those of the “fathers of modernism”, Kasimir Malevich, Vassily Kandinsky and Piet Mondrian.

A member of the avant-garde mystical movement, af Klint imbued his huge, colorful paintings with mysticism. The large abstract forms that dominate his canvases are inspired by Hermetic traditions and drawn from occult symbology. Known for holding seances at her home, af Klint claimed that “the images were painted directly through me, without preliminary drawings and with great power. I had no idea what the pictures would represent.

Believing that the world is not yet ready to see his paintings, af Klint left his family explicit instructions that his paintings be kept under lock and key for two decades after his death in 1944. Since being released from storage, the paintings d’af Klint have taken the art (and fashion) world by storm with exhibitions of his works breaking attendance records.

DETAILS: December 4 to March 27, 2022, adult admission $22.50. For more information, click here.

Moana Currents: Dress Aotearoa Now, MTG Hawke’s Bay Tai Ahuriri

Presented by the New Zealand Fashion Museum and curated by Doris de Pont and Dan Ahwa, Moana Currents: Dress Aotearoa Now examines how our history of migration and cultural exchange has shaped the way we dress today. The exhibition, which has toured other centers across the country, explores the vā across Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa (the Pacific Ocean) and how these different threads were woven together to create a distinctive identity unique to Aotearoa.

Pont and Ahwa selected pieces from emerging and established local designers working in fashion, jewelry and tattoo, to explore a range of themes such as technology, heritage craft techniques, changing cultural motifs and ongoing dialogue. between packaging and structured clothing. The exhibition includes pieces by Trelise Cooper, Emilia Wickstead, Bill Urale aka King Kapisi, Neil Adcock, Kereama Taepa and Zelda Murray.

DETAILS: November 27 to March 6, 2022. For more information, click here.

]]>