Marlborough artist – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 23:56:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://marlborough-monaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Marlborough artist – Marlborough Monaco http://marlborough-monaco.com/ 32 32 Exhibition seen through “international” eyes in the context of a Marlborough artist https://marlborough-monaco.com/exhibition-seen-through-international-eyes-in-the-context-of-a-marlborough-artist/ Fri, 18 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/exhibition-seen-through-international-eyes-in-the-context-of-a-marlborough-artist/ Scott Hammond / Stuff Phoebe Senior is a 23-year-old artist who is hosting her first solo art exhibition at Framingham Wines. A young Marlburian holds her first solo art exhibition with a contemporary and alternative approach to reused ceramics, painting and vintage artwork. Budding artist Phoebe Senior has over 50 different types of artwork on […]]]>
Phoebe Senior is a 23-year-old artist who is hosting her first solo art exhibition at Framingham Wines.

Scott Hammond / Stuff

Phoebe Senior is a 23-year-old artist who is hosting her first solo art exhibition at Framingham Wines.

A young Marlburian holds her first solo art exhibition with a contemporary and alternative approach to reused ceramics, painting and vintage artwork.

Budding artist Phoebe Senior has over 50 different types of artwork on display at Framingham Wines, and she was happy with the support she had received from the local community.

“It was very upsetting, it’s pretty crazy, I was just so lucky to have Framingham, and they supported me so much,” said the 23-year-old.

Framingham Marketing Director Bridget Glackin said people were really impressed with the show.

“When we had the opening a lot of locals were like, wow it’s like being in an international [art] exhibition, ”she said.

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Name of the painting: Prowling Tiger.  Tigers are known in the mythological world as symbols of strength, ferocity, severity, and courage.

Scott Hammond / Stuff

Name of the painting: Prowling Tiger. Tigers are known in the mythological world as symbols of strength, ferocity, severity, and courage.

When people started to visit the exhibit, Senior said the compliments she received made her feel like she was living her purpose in life.

“It made me feel very special and I felt that was really what I wanted to do; bring people in and see what I’m doing, ”she said.

Fine arts students at the University of Canterbury said she was born into a creative home, but it wasn’t until high school that she discovered a true passion for art.

The reuse and reuse reduction wall of vintage plates.

Scott Hammond / Stuff

The reuse and reuse reduction wall of vintage plates.

“My mom is very artistic, she always painted, she also had a jewelry business, it was a very creative household,” Senior said.

“I always painted and drew and took my sketchbook everywhere when I was younger.

“All my works; the paintings and ceramics are all carved around my love of classical and greek mythology.

Senior Persephone's painting represents the circle of life.

Scott Hammond / Stuff

Senior Persephone’s painting represents the circle of life.

The biggest work of Senior on display so far is called Persephone, which, according to her, was a “mixture of realism and surrealism”.

Persephone, she said, represents the circle of life from birth to death and return to life or the change of the four seasons on Earth – a myth taken from Greek mythology.

The top half of the chart represents growth and the bottom half of the chart represents death, she said.

The price of the paintings ranged from $ 60 to $ 2,950, with the exhibition until the end of October.


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Marlborough artist to host exhibition in town https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-to-host-exhibition-in-town/ Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-to-host-exhibition-in-town/ A LOCAL artist from Marlborough is hosting a party at Hope and Crown, showcasing a range of her contemporary artwork. Elizabeth Harwood, of Kelham Gardens, will host the event at The Hope and Crown in the Parade on Friday and Saturday (September 16-17) following the success of the last event she hosted in February. Ms […]]]>

A LOCAL artist from Marlborough is hosting a party at Hope and Crown, showcasing a range of her contemporary artwork.

Elizabeth Harwood, of Kelham Gardens, will host the event at The Hope and Crown in the Parade on Friday and Saturday (September 16-17) following the success of the last event she hosted in February.

Ms Harwood, of Kelham Gardens in Marlborough, said: “I am really encouraged by the response to my work, so I am delighted to host these other two events. The Hope and Crown in Marlborough, the location of the first, is an oasis of peace, light and space where guests can relax and enjoy art at their own pace. We’ll be serving bubbles and canapes in the gallery and of course there’s an open bar downstairs.

In addition to hosting a party in Marlborough, Ms Harwood will also be taking her pieces to Newbury for a second event from October 7-8.

Ms Harwood added: “Donnington Grove is the golf club where I play and with the magnificent backdrop of the castle, long fairways and vast lakes. It is a truly exceptional place to show my art and which inspires many paintings that I have created exclusively for the exhibition.

Tickets for the events are now on sale for £ 10 on Ms Harwood’s website, www.elizabethharwood-art.co.uk.


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Marlborough artist JS Parker complements Ralph Hotere’s canvas https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-js-parker-complements-ralph-hoteres-canvas/ Mon, 05 Sep 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-js-parker-complements-ralph-hoteres-canvas/ The canvas that JS Parker just finished painting is huge, even by his standards. It stretches over 1800 millimeters by 2180mm, dominating the wall of his Blenheim studio which already houses several large paintings. But the canvas is important beyond its size. It was originally owned by Parker’s mentor and iconic contemporary artist, the late […]]]>

The canvas that JS Parker just finished painting is huge, even by his standards.

It stretches over 1800 millimeters by 2180mm, dominating the wall of his Blenheim studio which already houses several large paintings.

But the canvas is important beyond its size. It was originally owned by Parker’s mentor and iconic contemporary artist, the late Ralph Hotere.

JS Parker uses a painting knife to create texture, followed by a brush to create fine lines.

RICKY WILSON / FAIRFAX NZ

JS Parker uses a painting knife to create texture, followed by a brush to create fine lines.

Parker had doubts about taking over the project initially, he said.

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“It was quite a challenge to paint something this big. I thought about it for a long time.”

JS Parker, in his studio in Blenheim, prefers large-scale paintings because they "look at you".

RICKY WILSON / FAIRFAX NZ

JS Parker, in his studio in Blenheim, prefers large-scale paintings because they “look back at you.”

Parker relied on Hotere’s advice as a recipient of the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship at the University of Otago, six years after Hotere received it, in 1975.

“He just kept an eye on me and helped me get used to the pressures of college life. He said ‘do something, then stick with it’. What I did, more or less, ”Parker said.

Parker spent most of his purse drawing from photographs taken at high speed through a car window.

He then worked with oil pastels, finding his place in vivid colors and textures, before moving on to oil painting, preferring larger canvases.

“The little paintings are something you have to look at, but these, they really stare at you. “

His recent series Simple song experimented with the balance between color and form in two-dimensional planes, applying paint with a painting knife.

“I wanted to work with color on a larger scale, because I really like color. And the more color there is, the more involved you get.”

His works differed from Hoere’s in that they invoked an emotional response from the viewer rather than conveying a message, he said.

Plain Song for Ralph (the Hotere canvas) featured a deep blue, a dark choice over the reds and yellows used in other works.

“For a large painting, I wanted something emotionally powerful, to cope with the size of it,” Parker said.

“Blue is usually associated with spiritual states, whether it is the sky or the sea or the reflection in a river, so blue has this ability to attract you in some way, while yellow is kind of thrown at you. . “

A thin shiny white line of a yellow tint cut in the middle, and a panel of cobalt mixed with shade was next to the deeper blue.

“Lighter blue means it highlights the darker blue, and it feels even heavier. It immerses you.”

The web came into Parker’s possession after Hotere abandoned it, following a period of ill health towards the end of his life.

“At the age of 71, I think it’s my opportunity to do something on this scale and do things while I’m still physically able to do them,” Parker said.

“Glad I accomplished it, that’s all. I don’t know how I feel until it’s in a gallery or after a few glasses of wine.”

Parker wouldn’t be drawn to what Hotere thought of the finished project.

“He’d never say much about a painting. He’d say, ‘that’s a damn good painting,’ or it isn’t, and that’s about it.”

Plain Song for Ralph (the Hotere canvas) would be displayed alongside other works by Parker in Color and scale – JS Parker at the Diversion Gallery in Picton, Sunday to October 12.


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Marlborough artist named living cultural treasure https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-named-living-cultural-treasure/ Wed, 13 May 2015 07:00:00 +0000 https://marlborough-monaco.com/marlborough-artist-named-living-cultural-treasure/ SCOTT HAMMOND / FAIRFAX FR Artist Triska Blumenfeld, with her painting ‘Marlborough Wine and Food Festival’, has been named Marlborough’s 2015 Living Treasure. A Marlborough artist whose primitive paintings caught the attention of a Hollywood star has been named Marlborough’s Living Cultural Treasure. Triska Blumenfeld is the fourth recipient of the award established in 2012 […]]]>
Artist Triska Blumenfeld, with her painting 'Marlborough Wine and Food Festival', has been named Marlborough's 2015 Living Treasure.

SCOTT HAMMOND / FAIRFAX FR

Artist Triska Blumenfeld, with her painting ‘Marlborough Wine and Food Festival’, has been named Marlborough’s 2015 Living Treasure.

A Marlborough artist whose primitive paintings caught the attention of a Hollywood star has been named Marlborough’s Living Cultural Treasure.

Triska Blumenfeld is the fourth recipient of the award established in 2012 by the Marlborough Museum in partnership with the Marlborough District Council and the Marlborough Express.

The award celebrates extraordinary, inspiring and important cultural endeavors in a lifetime.

The 88-year-old woman, who lives in Blenheim, said she was a “naive artist” who made colorful, real-life scenes of people her specialty.

“I have never done boring landscapes. For me color is very important.”

In 1998, she painted a large scene for the Marlborough Wine and Food Festival, recording the colors and the celebrations.

Many prints were made from this work, which promoted the festival around the world.

Blumenfeld never took any notes or made any preliminary drawings before painting.

Everything was from memory. “I like to put people in paintings that weren’t there but should be there.”

Old Express Journalist-cartoonist Henk Hilhorst usually came to the festival with his notebook. His death in 1991 was no reason for Blumenfeld to leave him out of his 1998 painting.

Other figures she captured in the painting included a Morris dancer, a garlic bulb imitator, and a group of Royal New Zealand Air Force cadets who showed up dressed in cotton sheets stamped by the airbase. , ready for an evening in a gown.

Marlborough Museum Managing Director Steve Austin, who is on the award’s selection jury, said his painting changed the national and international perception of Marlborough from a passive pastoral landscape to a dynamic new world.

“Her work gave Marlborough a revolutionary new visual identity that has gone international and is a milestone in the region’s branding, a legacy that still stands. Triska was a pioneer, whose works are appreciated. retain a broad appeal, and an ongoing connection to the present culture of Marlborough. “

The oil painting on canvas hangs in the Marlborough District Library in Blenheim. It has been preserved, extending its lifespan for another 100 years.

“One thing about the modern, primitive style is that it is very appealing to all cultures and all age groups,” Austin said. “It translates internationally.”

She became known in several countries as an exceptional artist working in a joyful and popular naive style.

Blumenfeld lived in Rome between 1970 and 1974 where Italian art critic Derna Querel included his works in a number of international naive art exhibitions.

In 1974, she moved to Fiji where she worked as an agricultural journalist. His work was promoted in the United States by Raymond Burr who starred in television and film classics Perry Mason, Ironside, Godzilla and Rear Window.

Blumenfeld said Burr lived part time on the island off the coast of Fiji.

“He was a flamboyant character who had a great acting career but he led a secret life. He had a wonderful house in Hollywood where I stayed. I went to all kinds of wonderful restaurants and met all kinds of people. people that I had only seen on the screen.You name them, I have met them.

Blumenfeld’s association with Marlborough began when she and her late husband, Grovetown olive grower Gideon Blumenfeld, moved to Marlborough in 1990.

She was nominated for the award by her niece Jennifer Wilkinson, who was researching her aunt’s life for a book on her life and work.

Blumenfeld will be presented with a medallion and cape, woven by Margaret Bond, in honor of her Living Treasure Prize at the Marlborough Museum next Friday.


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