10 must-see exhibitions in July

In July’s list of the best exhibitions in Canterbury, Warren Feeney recommends Graham Bennett AXIS + AXES as a must-see treasure, discovers that a disaster is more than an act of nature or a choice of God, and that after a ten-year absence, senior painter and printmaker Stanley Palmer is back to exhibit at the Center of arts Te Matatiki Toi Ora.

1. Graham Bennett, AXIS + AXES, Canterbury Museum, Rolleston Avenue:

AXIS + AXES is an exhibition-inquiry into the artistic practice of sculptor / printmaker Graham Bennett, revealing unseen studio work completed and in progress. Along with Bennett’s access to the Museum’s Pacific collection and influence on his work, the exhibit also features ceremonial paddles, clubs and adzes, their persuasive and confrontational presence, raising awareness of the complex and unresolved conversations between indigenous and colonial histories, past and present, making AXIS + AXES an inescapable treasure of an exhibition on several levels. Until October 25.

Estefania Mondaca - And there were the others who came from the flesh.  2018, oil and charcoal on paper (Art Hole)

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Estefania Mondaca – And there were the others who came from the flesh. 2018, oil and charcoal on paper (Art Hole)

2. Estefania Mondaca and Nanenko Olmos, Another View, Art Hole, 336 St Asaph St:

Recent immigrants from Latin America, the paintings of Estefania Mondaca and Nanenko Olmos in Another view offer alternative and different perspectives on the house. Their subjects, humans and animals, inhabit and seek solace in a suburban world to which they seem as accustomed as they are disconnected. They document familiar domestic spaces that somehow refuse to welcome our presence. July 6-10.

John Wishart, Ocean Beach Series, 2018, plaster and sisal, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

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John Wishart, Ocean Beach Series, 2018, plaster and sisal, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

3. John Wishart, Abandoned Works, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St:

Southland sculptor John Wishart’s Abandoned works encompasses the dilemma of an artist doing work that is hardly ever finished, and also recognizes the workers of Ocean Beach Freezing Works, its closure in 1991 and the loss of 1,450 jobs. Wishart describes his sculptures in Abandoned works as possessing an “in-between”, the ocean transforming and revealing the “uncertain beauty” of the vestiges of industry. Until July 23.

Matt Hunt, Circuit Board Hell, oil on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Matt Hunt, Circuit Board Hell, oil on canvas (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

4. Eugene Huston, The song remains the same. Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham:

Guest curator at the Jonathan Smart Gallery, Eugene Huston brings together a selection of works that consider the idea of ​​”catastrophe” in its broadest context, more than an act of nature or a choice of God, but fundamental to it. human condition. At the heart of The song stays the same is the power of Armageddon as a subject open to all imaginary possibilities, circumstances, behaviors and realities. Until July 17th.

The anatomy of Whorus nocturnus.  Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center.

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The anatomy of Whorus nocturnus. Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center.

5. Aotearoa sex workers. A day in the life of. Pūmanawa, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, 2 Worcester Blvd:

Now in its third year, A day in the life of is a traveling exhibition of works of art by sex workers that impart information and knowledge about life in the industry. It aims to change perceptions about female sex workers as portrayed in mainstream media and popular culture and, as an art exhibition in a gallery, deals with the enduring presence of the male gaze. July 6-18.

John Badcock, AM 19.2.21, oil on cardboard (Susan Badcock Studio)

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John Badcock, AM 19.2.21, oil on cardboard (Susan Badcock Studio)

6. John and Susan Badcock, Foraging, Susan Badcock Studio, 47 Talbot Street, Geraldine:

John Badcock’s Impressionist paintings and Susan Badcock’s hand-colored photographs constitute a group exhibition of two artists sharing familiar territory in attitude and subject matter. In Foraging, the two artists participate in the act of researching, bringing together and revealing the light, flora and fauna of the region and of the house they know so well. July 4-25.

Stanley Palmer Study for Above Ohauroro - Whangaroa, 2021 Oil on linen canvas and ACM panel (The Central Art Gallery)

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Stanley Palmer Study for Above Ohauroro – Whangaroa, 2021 Oil on linen canvas and ACM panel (The Central Art Gallery)

7. Stanley Palmer, The Central Art Gallery, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora, 2 Worcester Blvd:

The painter and printmaker Stanley Palmer returns to the Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, after having previously exhibited in the southern quadrant of the Gingko / Salamander Gallery (1980-2011), which has now disappeared. Palmer’s return is welcome news, with his exhibition of new paintings providing an opportunity to experience his finely tuned response to many conversations about the land, roads, hills, and surroundings of Aotearoa. Until July 25.

Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, 2021 (The National)

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Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, 2021 (The National)

8. Aaron Beehre, The Venetians, Le National, 249 avenue Moorhouse:

Lecturer at the School of Fine Arts of Ilam and award-winning book designer Aaron Beehre The Venetians is a series of large injected prints and one-prints masters in risography, their subjects, framed in a dramatic and evocative light of Caravaggio against the dark. From a historical and dramatic point of view, Beehre’s subjects are “Venetians”, ever changing and capricious. Until July 17

Fiona Connor, Untitled (letterbox) # 1- # 8 (installation view, Light enough to read from here), 2021. Image: Janneth Gil.  (The physics room)

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Fiona Connor, Untitled (letterbox) # 1- # 8 (installation view, Light enough to read from here), 2021. Image: Janneth Gil. (The physics room)

9. Fiona Connor, Lucy Skaer, Rachel Shearer and Cathy Livermore, Light enough to read, The Physics Room, 301 rue Montréal:

The physics room has reopened its library. Last seen when his gallery was located at 49-59 Worcester Blvd, the library’s restoration also comes with Light enough to read, an exhibition on writing as a means of communication beyond words. Artist Fiona Connor responds, orchestrating exchanges on form, volume, mass and surfaces, connecting and contrasting objects on the floor and walls of the gallery. Until July 25.

Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, 2021. Installation view at the CoCA Center of Contemporary Art Toi Moroki.  Image: John Collie Courtesy of CoCA

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Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, 2021. Installation view at the CoCA Center of Contemporary Art Toi Moroki. Image: John Collie Courtesy of CoCA

10. Nathan Pōhio and Luke Shaw, The Mist and the Horizon, CoCA Toi Moroki, 66 Gloucester St:

Installation by multimedia artist Nathan Pōhio and sound artist Luke Shaw The mist and the horizon presents an act of separation and reconciliation, a not insignificant task in the convoluted spaces of the north gallery of the CoCA. Citing a creation story Ngāi Tahu, Pohio’s light installation, moderate yet complete in its expanse of North Gallery spaces, is complemented by Shaw’s sound work, bringing together a resonance of country music duets, sharing a note of undulating fa to the organ and establishing a and a persistent presence throughout the space of the gallery. Until August 28.


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