10 must-see exhibitions in Canterbury in June


Warren Feeney The list of 10 recommended exhibitions in June includes three great reasons to visit Ralph Hotere face-to-face (resist), an installation that plays on window shopping and peepshows, and a ceramist who likes things thrown out, fallen into disgrace.

1. Ralph Hôtère, head (resist), Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o WaiwhetÅ«, corner of Montreal St and Worcester Blvd. There are many good reasons to visit head (resist), and here are three: Walk next to Hotere’s Godwit / Kuaka, 1977 and its 18 meters of constantly evolving animated colored surfaces. Be immersed in Black phoenix, 1984, The transformation by Hotere of the meteorological surfaces of a fishing trawler, commemorated and celebrated. Hotere’s and Bill Manhire’s TO SUPPORT, its corrugated iron and fluorescent tubes, shimmering dramatically in black and white. head (resist) is a “major investigation” and more. Until July 25.

For 10 must-see exhibitions in June: 2. Hannah Watkinson, Skate park or basketball court, Carters Beach, Westport, 2016, (CoCA Toi Moroki)

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For 10 must-see exhibitions in June: 2. Hannah Watkinson, Skate park or basketball court, Carters Beach, Westport, 2016, (CoCA Toi Moroki)

2. Hannah Watkinson, The near future. CoCA Toi Moroki, 66 Gloucester Street The near future is an investigative exhibition of Hannah Watkinson’s photographs of the past 10 years, documenting and reflecting on the evolving state of Buller and Westland. Among the selection are memorable images from 2016, then exhibited in Watkinson’s pop-up gallery, In Situ Photo Project, off Hereford St. Their images and message in 2021 are even more revealing and urgent than their first meeting. June 12 – August 28.

Caitlin Clarke, Belly Full of Greenery, 2021, (installation), Hot Lunch

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Caitlin Clarke, Belly Full of Greenery, 2021, (installation), Hot Lunch

3. Caitlin Clarke, belly full of greenHot Lunch, 227 High St. Multidisciplinary artist Caitlin Clarke’s belly full of green deals with the physical reality of the home, taking floor tiles, wall joists, window frames and earthenware, assembling a vast wooden installation in the artist-run space, Hot Lunch. Clarke describes his selected materials as a ‘relearning of his ancestors’ (from the Brunner mine to Dartmoor), and green belly filling, an evocation of “landscapes” that she calls lost, recovered, highs, lows, damp and home. June 18-30.

Nigel Borell, Untitled 2, 2021, acrylic, ink and silk brocade on paper, (Arts in Oxford Gallery)

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Nigel Borell, Untitled 2, 2021, acrylic, ink and silk brocade on paper, (Arts in Oxford Gallery)

4. Nigel Borell, Haumanu Hauora. Arts in the Oxford Gallery, 72 Main St, Oxford. Auckland-based artist and curator Nigel Borell (Pirirakau, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi, Te Whakatōhea) is artist in residence at Oxford, developing new paintings and organizing wānanga (workshops) by invitation with Maori art practitioners to share the arts mātauranga you maori knowledge. He defines Haumanu Hauora as an “expression which speaks of health and well-being”, and as such, identifies the principles of its exhibition and its residency. June 24 – August 15.

Max Gimblett, Ulysse, 2021, acrylic, water-based format and 23 karat Rosanoble gold leaf on canvas, (Nadine Milne Gallery)

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Max Gimblett, Ulysse, 2021, acrylic, water-based format and 23 karat Rosanoble gold leaf on canvas, (Nadine Milne Gallery)

5. Max Gimblett, The magic kingdom, Nadine Milne Gallery, 47, rue Hereford The magic kingdom is an exhibition-investigation of 15 paintings, covering 40 years of Max Gimblett’s practice. It is a revealing and magnificent exhibition of the best features of the artist’s work, his attention to his intuitive sensitivity to color and the assured meeting of the gestures of abstract expressionism and sumi-e Japanese ink painting. Certainly, Gimblett’s temperate recklessness Ulysses, 2021 is a splendid work among many others. Until June 30.

Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, Alien Headstand, 2021, (installation image), The Den

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Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, Alien Headstand, 2021, (installation image), The Den

6. Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin, The extraterrestrial pear tree, The Den, 181 High St. The extraterrestrial pear tree is a collaboration of Emma Wallbanks and Tim McLaughin that prohibits public access to the gallery space of The Den. Its windows being obscured, the only right of access is to look through four peepholes to visualize the projected images, varying according to the subject and the speed of their rotation. McLaughin describes it as “a game of window shopping, historical erotic peepshows, and an interest in communication through digital images.” June 2-12.

Hannah Kidd, Chinese Rainbow Pots, 2021, ceramic, steel and pewter, (The Central <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Hannah Kidd, Chinese Rainbow Pots, 2021, ceramic, steel and pewter, (The Central Art Gallery)

7. Group exhibition, Hi Auaha, The Central Art Gallery, Te Matatiki Toi Ora Arts Center, 2 Worcester Blvd. Hine Auaha (warriors, create, shape) is a collective exhibition by the artist and curator of the Laura Gobbe gallery, bringing together an impressive program of 13 artists through a range of artistic practices: Kirstin Carlin, Emma Camden, Zara Dolan, Larisse Hall, Veronica Herber, Lonnie Hutchinson, Hannah Kidd, Miranda Parkes, Ann Robinson, Elizabeth Thomson and Fiona Van Oyen. Rich in his imagery and his attitude, Hine Auaha is more than the sum of its many facets. June 24 – July 25.

Andrea du Chatenier, Glomerate, 2020, ceramic (Le National)

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Andrea du Chatenier, Glomerate, 2020, ceramic (Le National)

8. Andréa du Chatenier, EIGENLEBEN, The National, 249 Moorhouse Ave. EIGENLEBEN is the first solo exhibition of ceramic artist Andrea du Chatenier in Ōtautahi after more than two decades of national and international renown. Winner of the Portage Ceramic Residency Award in 2017, du Chatenier dismantles perceptions of ceramic objects, her work lying somewhere “between pleasure and discomfort”. She comments that she likes things abandoned, fallen out of favor. “When I started working with clay… it seemed ripe for reinvention and reinterpretation. »From June 2 to 27.

Ann Shelton, The Woodswoman, Gorse (Ulex europaeus), 2017, archival pigment print, (The National)

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Ann Shelton, The Woodswoman, Gorse (Ulex europaeus), 2017, archival pigment print, (The National)

9. Anne Shelton, missionaries,Aigantighe Art Gallery, 49 Wai-iti Rd, Timaru. at Ann Shelton missionaries, started as an exhibition at Auckland’s Two Rooms gallery in 2018 and is now on tour. missionaries is a series of still life photographs of plants in spaces that are both familiar and enigmatic, and undoubtedly exquisite. Robinson’s attention to the materiality of his subjects and its modulation of light and form, also inviting reflection on plants and the politics of their history and broader issues of colonialism, nationalism and feminism . June 12 – August 15.

Jasmine Gonzalez and Elliot 'Askew' O'Donnell, Continuum 8, 2021, acrylic, spray paint, UV pigment, transparent gel medium on canvas, (Fiksate Gallery)

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Jasmine Gonzalez and Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell, Continuum 8, 2021, acrylic, spray paint, UV pigment, transparent gel medium on canvas, (Fiksate Gallery)

10. Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell and Jasmine Gonzalez, Continuum, Fiksate, 54 Hawdon Street, Sydenham. Auckland-born Elliot ‘Askew’ O’Donnell is a street artist whose expansive public murals have made him an international name. His wife, Jasmine Gonzalez, born in the United States, has a history in fashion design and Continuum is their first post-Covid collaboration. Gonzalez’s photographs with Wellington dancer / poet Jahra Wasasala and O’Donnell’s mother florist Meghan Humphries are reconfigured into digital and analog painting techniques and images that appear as spontaneous as they are calculated and considered . June 4 – July 3.


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