10 exhibitions you can’t miss in Canterbury in June

In June, Warren Feeney looks forward to an exhibition that commends all of us to undertake an act of generosity, the display of a sculpture by Ōtautahi’s most overlooked sculptor, and a mural that celebrates the city’s unique relationship with Japan.

Maori moving picture ki Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetūcorner Montreal St and Worcester Blvd.

Described as a “rich collection of works that explore time, politics, language and place – and karaoke!” Māori Moving Image ki Te Puna o Waiwhetū is a collaboration between Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū and the Dowse Art Museum. Curated by Melanie Oliver and Bridget Reti, the exhibition continues the influential momentum of contemporary Maori art, nationally and internationally, with its origins and authority now stretching back over seven decades. June 4 – October 6.

Left to right: Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme'a Burrows, The Last Kai Gift, and Metiria Turei, Whanokē, installation image, (Ashburton <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Left to right: Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows, The Last Kai Gift, and Metiria Turei, Whanokē, installation image, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

gift, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West Street, Ashburton.

The Gift of Group Exhibition features 12 artists representing many identities and cultures: Rachel Hope Allan, Dr Margo Barton, Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows, Neil Emmerson, Alice Jones, Madison Kelly (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe) , Dr Stella Lange, Anna Muirhead, Louise Sutherland, Metiria Turei (Ngāti Kahungunu, Te Ātihaunui-a-Pāpārangi) and Georgina May Young (Te Upokorehe, Whakatōhea, Irish). Curated by Victoria Bell and Dr. Natalie Smith, The Gift’s attention to acts of generosity between individuals, communities and cultures, encourages us, by example, to share and also participate in an act of generosity. May 8 – June 19.

Matthew McIntyre Wilson, He Mahi Kupenga, Alexander Turnbull Library.  Photograph by the artist.  (Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri)

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Matthew McIntyre Wilson, He Mahi Kupenga, Alexander Turnbull Library. Photograph by the artist. (Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri)

Matthew McIntyre-Wilson, Matariki Artist in Residence, Oxford Gallery Toi o Waimakariri, Main Street, Oxford.

Weaver and sculptor Matthew McIntyre-Wilson (Taranaki, Ngā Mahanga and Titahi) has woven geometric patterns, grounded in raranga whakairo (braiding) with precious metals, treasures in the intimacy of their detail and vast possibilities. In June, McIntyre-Wilson is Oxford Gallery’s artist-in-residence Toi o Waimakariri, holding workshops for all and transforming the gallery into an active working studio. June 23 – July 17.

John Parker, Matte white grooved bottle/container and polychrome ring.  Photography, Ryan Dewsbury (Forms Gallery)

Ryan Dewsbury

John Parker, Matte white grooved bottle/container and polychrome ring. Photography, Ryan Dewsbury (Forms Gallery)

John Parker, Shape and Color, Gallery of Shapes, 468 Colombo Street, Sydenham.

Renowned potter John Parker has maintained the vitality of his ceramics for over five decades, committed to design principles based on the refined aesthetics of European modernism. In Form and Colour, Parker reveals his enduring commitment to Bauhaus traditions, his familiar monochrome ceramics complemented by new colored polychrome “wall rings”, proof that Parker continues to explore new, uncharted territory. June 4-25

William Trethewey, Sacrifice, 1937, cast bronze.  (Canterbury Museum)

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William Trethewey, Sacrifice, 1937, cast bronze. (Canterbury Museum)

The Sacrifice of William Trethewey, Canterbury MuseumRolleston Ave.

William Trethewey (1892–1956) is Aotearoa’s most overlooked sculptor, but responsible for some of our most important public artwork, particularly in his hometown of Ōtautahi Christchurch. Trethewey’s Citizen’s War Memorial, 1937, previously in Cathedral Square, is currently being restored, but the Canterbury Museum is hosting one of its five figures, Sacrifice. Influenced by Trethewey’s admiration for Michelangelo, the cast bronze form of the figure acquires a new and commanding presence in the museum foyer. In progress.

Lee Harper, The Sow's Ear, 2022, vinyl, polyester and cotton, (Art on the Quay)

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Lee Harper, The Sow’s Ear, 2022, vinyl, polyester and cotton, (Art on the Quay)

The Partners, PLACE, Art on the Quay176 Williams Street, Kaiapoi.

Les Associés is a collective of 10 artists, their work characterized by its response to domestic and environmental issues, their exhibition, PLACE, reconsidering the realities of its subjects. For example: Lee Harper’s The Sow’s Ear is a fond memory of a childhood home qualified by the memory of his mother’s observation: “I walked past our house one day and my mother said, ‘You don’t can’t make a silk purse out of a sow”. ear’. Not a judgement, rather a statement of fact. From June 9 to July 13.

Kara Burrowes, Absentia VI, (detail), 2022, oil and plaster on panel, (Chambers Gallery)

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Kara Burrowes, Absentia VI, (detail), 2022, oil and plaster on panel, (Chambers Gallery)

Kara Burrowes, Lost Space, Chambers Gallery80 Durham Street, Sydenham.

Currently completing her MFA at Ilam School of Fine Arts, Lost Space by Kara Burrowes is about our experience of the earth and also an encounter with the qualities of her oil and canvas paintings. plaster on panel. Burrowes exceeds expectations in landscape paintings that are as provocative and contemporary as they are believable in their sophistication and mastery of materials. June 1-18.

Jillian Wordsworth, Ask the Darkness, Seek the Light, 2022, oil on canvas (Murray & Co – Emerging Artists in Conversation)

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Jillian Wordsworth, Ask the Darkness, Seek the Light, 2022, oil on canvas (Murray & Co – Emerging Artists in Conversation)

Hana Olsen and Jillian Wordsworth: Emerging Artists in ConversationMurray & Co.

Investment banking firm Murray & Co’s long-term commitment to Ōtautahi arts graduates in 2022 sees the work of artists Barbara Boekelman, Hana Olsen, Chloe Summerhayes and Jillian Wordsworth exhibited at the firm’s offices at Durham St. The exhibition also features two lunchtime events, the second in June the opportunity to hear Olsen and Wordsworth discuss their work with University of Canterbury painting professor Raewyn Martyn . To attend: murrayandco-emerging-artists-in-conversation.eventbrite.co.nz. Friday, June 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Chris Heaphy, Your Song, 2022, acrylic on Belgian linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Chris Heaphy, Your Song, 2022, acrylic on Belgian linen (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

Chris Heaphy, Everyday Life, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham.

After at least two decades of paintings that focused their attention on silhouetted patterns, figurative images, and graphics, in Everyday Life Chris Heaphy apparently prioritized painting as the subject of his attention. In Your Song, the artist’s title could be about his painterly surfaces, the result of painting on linen, stretching and blurring his images, and intensifying our engagement with color and space. . June 1-30.

For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in June: 10 Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end), (Flare Festival, Salt District)

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For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in June: 10 Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end), (Flare Festival, Salt District)

Koryu, A Hum (the beginning and the end). Salt district, center of Ōtautahi.

With 44 new works of art being performed for the March Flare Festival, all at the intersection of the Salt District with High, Manchester and St Asaph streets, the city center should be high on everyone’s list for an art experience serious. A highlight is the festival audience’s choice of A Hum (the Beginning and the End) by Japanese-born Koryu. The largest mural done for the festival, and singled out by street art scholar Reuben Woods: “The work touches on many levels, drawing on the shared experiences of the Ōtautahi earthquakes and the tremors of land and the Tohuku tsunami, which occurred a few weeks after each other… Koryu considers his figures [in this work] as guardians of the city.

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