10 exhibitions not to miss in Canterbury in July

Warren Feeney recommends an exhibition that reveals the experiences and results of some of those close to the 1957 nuclear weapons tests in the Pacific, one by an artist whose paintings take on unique personalities day and night, and one of paintings that evoke memories of the Old Masters.

Denise Baynham’s Operation Grapple: We Were There, Canterbury Museum, 11 Rolleston Ave

“All of that bomb testing was coming back to me like a panic attack. I ended up doing 16 sessions with a psychologist… my grandson died at 24. He had testicular cancer and bone cancer, what I thought was my fault because of my genes HMNZS Rotoiti radio operator Tere Tahi revealing memories of his support for British Navy nuclear weapons testing in the Pacific in 1957. Documenting the experience By 19 New Zealand Navy sailors through interviews and photographs, Denise Baynham’s Operation Grapple: We Were There, is a tearful, unsettling and timely exhibit.

Motoko Kikkawa, Engine in nature, 2021, photographic light box, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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Motoko Kikkawa, Engine in nature, 2021, photographic light box, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

Presentation Layer: Forms, Platforms and NFT Transfer, Ilam Campus Gallery, Fine Arts Lane, off Clyde Rd

An exhibition that asks many questions about NFTs (non-fungible tokens), how an artist might respond to technology and its presence through their practice – and more. Presentation Layer is also a stunning visual experience with an accompanying catalog that defuses the darkness that NFTs currently possess. Co-hosted by Antistatic, Nina Dyer and Raewyn Martyn, Presentation Layer has a timely and welcome attitude and thoughtfulness. Until July 15

Salle Larisse, time is.  A Surprise, 2021, oil, 12V LED light, hand-stretched shapes/cotton, (The Central <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Salle Larisse, time is. A Surprise, 2021, oil, 12V LED light, hand-stretched shapes/cotton, (The Central Art Gallery)

Salle Larisse, the time has come. Gasoline, The Central Art Gallery, The Arts Center Te Matatiki Toi Ora, 2 Worcester Blvd

Tāmaki Makaurau-based artist Larisse Hall is holding her first solo exhibition in Ōtautahi, featuring a new series of her “light-infused” paintings. Hall’s stretched cotton wall paintings/sculptures, and the light that shines within and beyond their surfaces is magical, a conversation between the ephemeral and the material, with the Central Art Gallery open for a selection of day and night. (details: https:///thecentral.co.nz). Until July 24.

Miles Dover, Tête-à-Tête, 2022, mixed media on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

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Miles Dover, Tête-à-Tête, 2022, mixed media on canvas (Windsor Gallery)

Miles Dover, New Paintings, Windsor Gallery, 386 St Asaph St

Originally from Southampton and residing in Ōtautahi since 2002, Miles Dover’s paintings reconsider the nature of our relationships with each other, tangible connections and estrangements. Dover works with a range of media including acrylics, spray paint, charcoal, brushes, stencils and palette knives, the humor and darkness of his paintings shared democratically between humans and sometimes domesticated associates. July 1 to 31.

Karin Barr, The Blues, Quintuplets, 2022, cast glass on Timaru Bluestone (Susan Badcock Gallery)

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Karin Barr, The Blues, Quintuplets, 2022, cast glass on Timaru Bluestone (Susan Badcock Gallery)

Karin Barr and Graeme Hitchcock, Cast Glass, Susan Badcock Gallery, 47 rue Talbot, Geraldine

Famous for his “men in ties, looking upwards”, glass artist Graeme Hitchcock shares the space of the Susan Badcock Gallery with the refined geometric sculptures and evocative abstract figures of Karin Barr. Recognizing the influence of German Bauhaus design, Barr’s interest in the possibilities of cast glass is complemented by his use of additional materials including stone, wood and metal. 9 – 30 July.

Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, 2021, oil on panel (Chambers Gallery)

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Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, 2021, oil on panel (Chambers Gallery)

Casey Bailey, Pilgrimage, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham

Casey Bailey’s oil on panel paintings evoke reflections on European art, Old Masters, portraiture and landscape painting. Yet Bailey brings new life and relevance to her subjects and materials, grounded in her intuitive understanding of their potential, capturing the immediacy of a moment in time and paying due attention to the distinct qualities of her practice. July 13-30.

David Elliot, The Whistling Bull, mixed media on paper, (<a class=Ashburton Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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David Elliot, The Whistling Bull, mixed media on paper, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

David Elliot and Jack Lasenby, The Whistling Bull, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St

Internationally recognized as a writer/illustrator of children’s books, David Elliot also has a working relationship with children’s author Jack Lasenby. In Ashburton Art Gallery’s survey exhibition, The Whistling Bull, they confirm that they make an excellent combination. Until August 19.

Fayne Robinson, (Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu), Ngā Hoe and Lisa Harding (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine), Poipoiā and Moemoeā (Pumanawa Gallery)

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Fayne Robinson, (Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu), Ngā Hoe and Lisa Harding (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine), Poipoiā and Moemoeā (Pumanawa Gallery)

Paula Rigby, Fayne Robinson, Riki Manuel, Zena Elliott, Helena Rollo, Lisa Harding, Corabelle Summerton, Alix Ashworth, Asher Newbery and Piri Cowie, Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, Matariki, Pūmanawa Gallery, The Arts Center

A group exhibition celebrating Matariki, featuring an impressive line-up of artists working in raranga (weaving), whakairo (sculpture), waituhi (drawing) and pakoko (sound). Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, Matariki brings together generations of artists, from famed sculptor Riki Manual to emerging installation artist Alix Ashworth. Until July 9.

Polish artist Pener approaches one of his impressive abstract murals in Europe, (Fiksate Gallery)

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Polish artist Pener approaches one of his impressive abstract murals in Europe, (Fiksate Gallery)

Pener, Vacation from Reality, Fiksate Gallery, 54 Hawden St, Sydenham

Fiksate welcomes international street artist Pener (Bartek Świątecki) as artist-in-residence in July. Over the past two decades, his imagery has evolved through site-specific paintings, animations and installations, believable in their engagement with abstract images that encompass all in their spatial ambiguities. Street art scholar Reuben Woods describes Pener as the artist pushing graffiti aesthetics in new directions. Opening July 15.

Karen Sewell, Awakenings IV, 2020 Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland, earlier version of Luminary, (Oxford Baptist Church)

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Karen Sewell, Awakenings IV, 2020 Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland, earlier version of Luminary, (Oxford Baptist Church)

Karen Sewell, Light Fixture, Oxford Terrace Baptist Church, 286 Oxford Tce

Luminary is a traveling exhibition by Karen Sewell, a Tāmaki Makaurau-based artist working in installation, as well as photography, sculpture, video, and sound and light. In its materials and processes, Luminary is an invitation to the artist to contemplate the “wonder of things”, the choice of exhibition spaces in places of prayer, encouraging the consideration of the world, mysticism, spirituality and the contemplation. July 16 – 24.

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