10 exhibitions not to miss in Canterbury in January

For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in January: Christine Hurihia-Wirihana, Ngati Maniapoto-Raukawa, Ngati Whawhakia, Tainui, Ngati Pikiao, Te Arawa, b 1949, Kahui Whiritoi 2005-20.  Ten kete representing the 10 hui of Te Kahui Whiritoi;  tikouka, kiekie, pingao, harakeke, macrame yarn, muka, cotton, bamboo, silk, pheasant feathers, raurekau dyes and tanekaha bark.  Collection of the artist, Rotoiti, Rotorua (Christchurch <a class=Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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For 10 exhibitions not to be missed in January: Christine Hurihia-Wirihana, Ngati Maniapoto-Raukawa, Ngati Whawhakia, Tainui, Ngati Pikiao, Te Arawa, b 1949, Kahui Whiritoi 2005-20. Ten kete representing the 10 hui of Te Kahui Whiritoi; tikouka, kiekie, pingao, harakeke, macrame yarn, muka, cotton, bamboo, silk, pheasant feathers, raurekau dyes and tanekaha bark. Collection of the artist, Rotoiti, Rotorua (Christchurch Art Gallery)

1. Te Puna Waiora: The Distinguished Weavers of Te Kāhui Whiritoi, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Worcester Blvd/Montreal Street.

Aotearoa’s most respected contemporary Maori weavers are represented in a major survey that may well be the most significant exhibition in the public gallery’s 90-year history. Such a claim also begs the question; why did it take so long? Inevitably, the answer lies in colonialism and the hierarchies that public galleries have traditionally assigned to arts and crafts. A partnership project between Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū and Te Roopu Raranga Whatu O Aotearoa, with support from Toi Māori. December 18 – April 23.

Shane Woolridge, One Too Many, 2022, (Sculpture on the peninsula)

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Shane Woolridge, One Too Many, 2022, (Sculpture on the peninsula)

2. Sculpture on the peninsula, Loudon Farm, Banks Peninsula.

After 21 years sculpture on the peninsula hosts its latest event, with manager Gill Hay publicly announcing it’s time to “call it a day”. Run by the Lombardy Charitable Trust and its 200 volunteers, sculpture on the peninsula is famous for its biennial Cholmondeley Children’s Home fundraising auction and three-day sculpture exhibition, with a record 72 participating artists this year. January 28-30.

Colin McCahon (1919-1987) Taylors Mistake, 1948, oil on canvas, courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust.  All rights reserved.  (Ravenscar Trust Museum)

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Colin McCahon (1919-1987) Taylors Mistake, 1948, oil on canvas, courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust. All rights reserved. (Ravenscar Trust Museum)

3. Ravenscar House Museum, 52 Rolleston Ave.

The Ravenscar Trust Collection is the private collection of entrepreneurs Jim and Susan Wakefield, now available to the public. The collection contains five paintings by Colin McCahon and the first work acquired was Taylor’s mistake, 1948. Susan’s daughter Francis Lojkine remembers it as the view from their home over Taylors Mistake and its headlands. For McCahon, Taylors Mistake stood out among his landscapes, many of which then served as the backdrop for his interest in New Testament subjects. Open every day.

Heather Straka, Isolation Hotel Mambokadzi Tsvarakadenga Queen The Beautiful One, 2021. Image courtesy of Heather Straka.  (Canterbury Museum)

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Heather Straka, Isolation Hotel Mambokadzi Tsvarakadenga Queen The Beautiful One, 2021. Image courtesy of Heather Straka. (Canterbury Museum)

4. Heather Straka, Isolation Hotel, Canterbury Museum, 11 Rolleston Ave.

Isolation hotel is both installation and exhibition, a 1930s German hotel that is both of this world and not of this world. On both counts, he is disarmingly hospitable. Whether meeting the struggling hunter or Queen Mambokadzi Tsvarakadenga, Straka invites us as hotel visitors to consider the familiarity of ‘otherness’. A timely and welcome invitation to all, Isolation hotel does not disappoint. Until March 20.

Kulimoe'anga Stone Maka, Kuini Haati 2 (Two Queen Heart) and Toga mo Bolata'ane (Tonga and Great Britain), 2008–10, oil, clay, tapa fabric dye (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, Kuini Haati 2 (Two Queen Heart) and Toga mo Bolata’ane (Tonga and Great Britain), 2008–10, oil, clay, tapa fabric dye (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

5. Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, Kume Ē Manatu, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan St, Sydenham.

Representing Aotearoa at the Biennale of Sydney in 2020, the exhibition of Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, originally from Tonga, Kume Ē Manatu (Finding Black Tapa Memories), features new works that have their origins in his time as 2009 Macmillan Brown Pacific Artist-in-Residence, exploring traditional processes of smoking Tongan mats into smoked webs. They share the Jonathan Smart Gallery with a major new work of tapa noir. Starts January 28. End date to be confirmed.

Sione Monū, Ao Kakala Ōtautahi, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist and SCAPE Public Art.  Photo credit: Heather Joy Milne.  (SCAPE Public Art)

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Sione Monū, Ao Kakala Ōtautahi, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist and SCAPE Public Art. Photo credit: Heather Joy Milne. (SCAPE Public Art)

6. Sione Monū, Ao Kakala Ōtautahi, 2021, Cunningham House, Botanical Gardens.

The 2021 season of SCAPE Art Public, Cast shadows manages curator Jamie Hanton’s second three-year program for SCAPE, viewing Ōtautahi as a city “reinventing its potential”. Installation by Tongan artist Sione Monū, Ao Kakala Ōtautahi, is at Cunningham House in Hagley Park. A grand greenhouse framing and containing the natural world, Monū’s floating, colorful clouds magically raise its levels of enchantment even further. Until January 14.

Tim Main, Kauri Totem VIII, 2021, reclaimed oak, black stain, ceramic, (Ng Design)

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Tim Main, Kauri Totem VIII, 2021, reclaimed oak, black stain, ceramic, (Ng Design)

seven. Tim Main and Nichola Shanley, New Works, Ng Design, Unit 8, 75 Peterborough St.

Moving from Madras St to Peterborough St, Ng Design has, to some extent, retained its stable of artists, their presence bolstered by a range of new work. Artist and designer Tim Main’s questioning tribute to the native species and woods of Aotearoa, Kauri Totem, is a group of meticulously crafted sculptures in stained oak and ceramic, as ironic as they are irresistible, animated objects. January and February.

Sandra Hussey, Surfacing, 2021, acrylic and resin on canvas in an ash wood frame, 585 x 660 mm (Chambers Gallery)

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Sandra Hussey, Surfacing, 2021, acrylic and resin on canvas in an ash wood frame, 585 x 660 mm (Chambers Gallery)

8. Sandra Hussey, Containing Change, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham.

Sandra Hussey, painter from South Canterbury Contain the change consists of new works that assert their presence as abstract images separated from, but connected to, the natural world. Central to these paintings are the dynamic and reflective relationships that Hussey establishes within and between the paintings, his focus on a conversation about expansive abstract forms and smaller, more intimate forms. January 19 – February 5.

Michele Beevors, MMMM, fur and mixed media, 2019-21, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

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Michele Beevors, MMMM, fur and mixed media, 2019-21, (Ashburton Art Gallery)

9. Sarah Baird, Michele Beevors, Maggie Covell, Kiri Mitchell, Tamara Nicholson and Kylie Norton, Configure, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

Six women artists from Ōtepoti Dunedin prove that feminism in the 21st century is as vital as it has always been. Configure delivers its messages on a grand scale, occupying all of the gallery’s exhibition spaces, its life-size and larger-than-life figures entertaining and amusing, yet equally intimidating and challenging. Until January 21.

Donna-Marie Patterson, Moonlight Memories, 2020, ink on cotton (PGgallery192)

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Donna-Marie Patterson, Moonlight Memories, 2020, ink on cotton (PGgallery192)

ten. Summer selection, PG gallery192, 192 Bealey Ave.

Summer selection is a rotating exhibition of the gallery’s artists, including works by Polly Gilroy, Katie Thomas and Donna-Marie Patterson, a sculptor and installation artist whose practice also includes complex works on paper. Patterson’s drawings connect the relationship between science and art in images that reconcile the small detail of the natural world with artist Henri Matisse’s assertion that drawing is about “taking a line for a walk”. January 18 – February 11.

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