10 exhibitions not to miss in Canterbury in August

In August, Warren Feeney is excited about a new gallery of Pacific art in the city center and looks forward to an exhibition of artists also wandering around and one of the previously unseen paintings from Gretchen Albrecht’s studio.

Hanna Kidd, The comfort of the South, The Central Art Gallery, Christchurch Center for the Arts, 2 Worcester Boulevard

A graduate of the Otago Polytechnic School of Art, Hannah Kidd’s famous corrugated iron sculptures also reveal the influence of a time spent with an engineering firm in her hometown of Methven. Among his favorite subjects are farm animals and Southern comfort is an exhibition about dogs. Avoiding sentimentality, his corrugated metal canines are stunning in their individuality and physical presence – absolutely recommended viewing. July 29 – August 28.

Filipe Tohi, Fish in the Net, 2022, (Haulomilomi), wood, wool and nails (Fibre Gallery)

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Filipe Tohi, Fish in the Net, 2022, (Haulomilomi), wood, wool and nails (Fibre Gallery)

Dagmar Dyck, Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka and Filipe Tohi, Models of the past – Formatting of the future, Fiber Gallery, Level 1, 285 Cashel Street

There is a new gallery in Ōtautahi Christchurch and it is dedicated to the art of the Pacific, its artists and its communities. Founded by Nina Oberg Humphries and the Tagata Moana Trust, its opening exhibition features three senior artists from the Pacific; Filipe Tohi, Dagmar Dyck and Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka, embodying the gallery’s commitment to Pacific culture and a broader strategy of visibility and empowerment. July 12 – August 21

Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogdendgen-Travis, Exquisite Corpse #1, 2022, mixed media, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

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Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogdendgen-Travis, Exquisite Corpse #1, 2022, mixed media, (Ilam Campus Gallery)

Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long, James Newey and Rupert Ogden-Travis, ConsequencesIlam Campus Gallery, Fine Arts Lane, near Clyde Rd

Consequences is the second of four exhibitions in Ilam Campus Gallery’s annual student series, consisting of an assemblage of works by BFA (Honours) students Harriette Herlund, Claudia Long and James Newey, and painting student of MFA Rupert Ogden-Travis. Working through graphic design, painting and sculpture, all the artists engage with an attitude as playful as they are curious, delivering unforeseen consequences and surprises galore in the making of each work. August 4-12

Neil Dawson, Poise, 2022, acrylic, aluminum, polycarbonate, automotive paint, (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

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Neil Dawson, Poise, 2022, acrylic, aluminum, polycarbonate, automotive paint, (Jonathan Smart Gallery)

Neil Dawson, balance, Jonathan Smart Gallery, 52 Buchan Street, Sydenham

Sculptor Neil Dawson is widely acclaimed for Fanfare, one of the largest public works of art in the country, but its sculpture continually oscillates between monumentality and intimacy. Dawson’s Horizons The Gibbs Farm facility in Auckland is 36 meters wide, while its floating feathers measure around 2 meters. Individual and visually deceptive in their undulating surfaces and light, Dawson’s works in balance share the multiple complexities that support and characterize his practice. August 4 – September 3.

Gretchen Albrecht, Illumination (celestial), 1977, acrylic on canvas (NMG Nadine Milne Gallery)

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Gretchen Albrecht, Illumination (celestial), 1977, acrylic on canvas (NMG Nadine Milne Gallery)

Gretchen Albrecht, nine illuminations 1975 – 1978, NMG, 141 Cambridge Tce

Writer and art curator Anne Kirker describes Gretchen Albrecht’s paintings as key to validating abstraction in the visual arts in Aotearoa, with the artist working towards a ‘distilled visual statement’ which Kirker identifies as the one of the finest produced in this country. by Albrecht nine illuminations is an introduction to previously unseen paintings from 1975 to 1978, its imagery progressing as “more a metaphor for landscape than a direct translation of it”. August 5 – September 10.

Marti Freidlander, 1974, Tramping, Arthur's Pass, South Island, photograph, (Oxford Gallery toi o Waimakariri)

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Marti Freidlander, 1974, Tramping, Arthur’s Pass, South Island, photograph, (Oxford Gallery toi o Waimakariri)

No. 2 ART Tramp ShowOxford Gallery thee o Waimakariri, 72 Main St, Oxford

Twenty-five artists take a walk and open a large collective exhibition in Oxford. Art Tramp Show #2 represents four generations of artists, from photographer Mark Adams to conceptual artist Jae-Hoon Lee. Curator Areta Wilkinson invites everyone to the opening weekend, with participating artists hosting gear talks, a boot repair demo, field cooking, tramping trip slideshows and all heading for the hills. August 25 – September 18.

Olivia Chamberlain, Night Fall, 2022, acrylic on cotton on board, (City Art Depot)

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Olivia Chamberlain, Night Fall, 2022, acrylic on cotton on board, (City Art Depot)

Olivia Chamberlain, Cuts, City Art, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham

Cuts may seem somewhat understated as an exhibition title, but for Olivia Chamberlain it encompasses many of her materials, decision-making and the processes of her practice, drawing our attention to paintings about the close experience of qualities their aesthetics; color, surfaces, materials and the nature of their evocative relationships. August 16 – September 5.

Marian Maguire, Sight and Blindness 2: Expansion, 2018-21, archival inkjet print, (PG gallery192)

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Marian Maguire, Sight and Blindness 2: Expansion, 2018-21, archival inkjet print, (PG gallery192)

Marianne Maguire, Enlightenment projectsPG gallery192, 192 Bealey Avenue

In Enlightenment Projects, master printmaker Marian Maguire connects the dots between Western art, 19th century colonialism and Aotearoa history. Visually and philosophically, Maguire connects European expansionism, the Enlightenment, theology, politics, law, science, ethnography and more, in an exhibition as question-rich as it is confronting and illuminating. . August 9 – September 2.

Heidi Brickell, Pakanga for the lostgirl, (detail of work in progress), 2021, (The Physics Room)

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Heidi Brickell, Pakanga for the lostgirl, (detail of work in progress), 2021, (The Physics Room)

Heidi Brickell, (Te Hika o Papauma, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rangitāne, Rongomaiwahine) Pakanga for the lost girl, The Physics Room, 301 Montreal Street

A work commissioned from St Paul’s Gallery in Auckland, Pakanga for the lost girl is a multimedia installation. A recent graduate of the University of Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Arts, the diversity of Brickell’s materials and the diverse relationships and questions they represent across multiple possibilities and viewpoints, opens up and confounds a single reading in this, his first personal exhibition. August 5 – September 11.

Peter McIntyre, Canterbury Shearing Shed, 1961, oil on canvas, The Kelliher Art Trust (<a class=Ashburton Art Gallery)” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

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Peter McIntyre, Canterbury Shearing Shed, 1961, oil on canvas, The Kelliher Art Trust (Ashburton Art Gallery)

Rare and Unparalleled Beauty. Award-winning landscapes from the Kelliher Art Trust collection. Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West St.

The first national art prize in Aotearoa (1956-1977), Rare and Unparalleled Beauty is an exhibition of paintings by Kelliher Prize-winning artists. The award has always advocated for landscape painting as opposed to modernism, celebrating its role as art for the “average person”. Today its significance lies in its history, and more immediately in a welcome encounter with paintings by artists like Austen Deans and Peter McIntyre. August 8 – October 2.

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